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Ten Valuable New Year's Resolutions for Filmmakers

01.10.11 @ 9:17AM Tags : , , , ,

We’re a week into the new year, and it’s certainly not too late to make some filmic new year’s resolutions. I would come up with my own list, except NoFilmSchool interviewee Scott Macaulay has already posted a great set of ten new year’s resolutions over at Filmmaker Magazine. Here’s the list of ten, along with one of the resolutions:

8. Review your productivity and alter your creative behavior. Conduct a review of your own best practices, the circumstances and behavior that lead to your greatest level of productivity and/or creativity, and more purposefully engineer the creation of those moments. If the best work you’ve ever done was at a mountain retreat when you were unplugged from the world, do that again. Do you need to go to an office, a library, a Starbucks? Are you better in collaboration with someone else? Do you need more structure? Or less? Does being plugged in all the time create a kind of false productivity? If so, remember to take regular walks around the block or trips to museums and let your mind roam.


My most productive stretch during the past couple of years didn’t occur during a “mountain retreat,” but it was a sabbatical pretty similar to that. As such, I’ve just finalized plans to repeat the same trip in a week’s time. This decision stemmed from the practice of tracking hours; more to come soon on my particular approach, and why I made such a decision. Regardless, the other nine resolutions should be essential reading, as we can all improve in 2011 — no matter what we accomplished in 2010. What are some of your creative resolutions for 2011?

Link: New Year’s Resolutions for Filmmakers

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