March 28, 2012

Two DIY Jib Projects That Will Cost You No More Than $30 and Some Elbow Grease

Have you been jonesing for arcing vertical and horizontal camera moves?  Perhaps you simply want an easy way to elevate your camera without having to climb a fence or set your tripod ontop of a chair.  Well, you're in luck.  Here are two DIY jib projects that will let you do those things for less than $30 and a bit of your time.  The first is a small jib arm courtesy of Olivia Tech, the second is a slightly larger jib project from The Frugal Filmmaker, check out these videos to see them in action:

This first jib arm from Olivia Tech looks like a pretty nice tool for folks wanting something light and portable, and it's small enough that you could reasonably keep an eye on the camera's screen without needing a monitor.  Judging from the sample video it also looks pretty smooth:

http://vimeo.com/39210511

For instructions and build details, go here.

If you're looking for a larger jib that also lets you tilt the camera, then this second project from Scott Eggleston, aka the Frugal Filmmaker, may be more to your liking:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VvJB2RT3xc

With a jib this large it will be more likely that you'll need a monitor, and with that in mind Eggleston shows his own set up.  This is actually the second version of a design Eggleston had previously constructed, so check out both videos for a full instructional.  You can find the first version along with a full parts list here, and the updated version featured in the video here.

You might think, "well, when am I really going to need those swooping vertical/horizontal moves?"  You never know, and luckily, both of these projects can be pulled off for relatively cheap, so they may make for a good weekend project.

Have you tried building your own jib?  How were the results?  When's the last time you used a jib?

[via CheesyCam and The Frugal Filmmaker]

Your Comment

18 Comments

Awesome Post. Thank You!!!!!!!!

March 28, 2012

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Joe

I'm on it, thanks for posting!

March 28, 2012

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I don't know. Seems like an awful lot of work when you can get the Glideshot pretty affordably and it works out of the box. Just my honest opinion.

March 28, 2012

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Cheryl

If you don't have the proper saw for cutting and punching holes in metal this may me a worthwhile path. I found this out the hard way when trying to make a DIY track dolly without these items.

March 28, 2012

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moebius22

I meant to say "tools" instead of saw.

March 28, 2012

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moebius22

olivia, man all i gotta say is wow

March 28, 2012

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alguti

These types of posts are great.

March 28, 2012

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Mark

Good to hear you guys liked the post - i'm hoping to start a weekly round-up of DIY projects, so stay tuned!

March 28, 2012

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Yes, E.M.! I suspect you have a decent contingent of frugal, low-end media artists on the site. Thanks!!!

March 29, 2012

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Idol-Maker

It would be also great to have a "best of" since there are tons of diy project coming out...
Maybe also for different price ranges?

September 13, 2012

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Andrea

The Frugal Filmmaker illustrates jus how hard it is to make a good DIY video. The info is good, but the presentation sucks ... big time. You really do need a script, winging it doesn't cut it. Olivia, on the other hand, had her act together.

Jibs also work great for non-moving shots. Never move furniture again -- want to put the camera where the dining room is located, just boom the camera over the table. Is that kitchen island getting in the way, not if you have a jib.

March 29, 2012

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c.d.embrey

Let's be fair. This is a guy without a crew, using what little time he has, to make a video to pass on some information, not wow us with his production values or looks.

Olivia's videos have some useful information, but that crane of hers barely has any height.

March 29, 2012

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moebius22

nor does it looks very smoother from those few shots she demonstrated..maybe try adding more weight on both ends?

March 29, 2012

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Joe

True...but with an eleven and a half minute video it would've been nice to see more than 15 seconds worth of jib footage. Jus' saying...

March 29, 2012

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Idol-Maker

@moebius22, no real problems with production value. He needs to remove "basically" and "essentially" from his vocabulary.

He also needs to get his facts right. That's not a joist, a joist is a 2x4, 2x6, 2x8, etc that makes the floor or ceiling framing in wood construction http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joist It is actually an angle bracket http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/A.asp

The Hex size for an 8-32 machine screw nut is 11/32, so the "nut & bolt" size is 8-32 not 11/32.

There is no reason to keep referring to the "old design," mentioning that this is an upgrade at the opening is all that is needed. Holding an audience is difficult ... don't make it more difficult.

A few minuets spent writing and editing a script, and also fact checking all info, would make this a much more helpful DIY video.

March 30, 2012

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c.d.embrey

DIY...Great idea for articles!

I used wire cable on my DIY Jib also!

March 29, 2012

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Nice Jibs especially for $30! Here's another DIY Jib with camera tilt feature but the builder used mostly recycled materials. The sample footage is pretty good on it.

http://learnlikeme.com/index.php/diy-camera-jib-with-tilt-feature-using-...

January 29, 2014

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Frank

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March 9, 2014

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