June 15, 2012

Test Videos for the Canon T4i Are In, but is It Worth the Upgrade?

There's been quite a bit of talk about cameras lately, maybe a little too much, but it has become quite clear that the differences between camera systems are more minimal than they've ever been, and it's possible to get good results from almost any of them. We already looked at the 5D Mark III and the T2i, and it was clear that for web video, the final image quality was very similar. Now comes the Canon T4i, which is an update to the popular T3i/T2i cameras. The video reviews are out, but should you upgrade?

Sebastian over at cinema5D has had the camera for a little while and he's put together two videos that give a sense of the video quality and the low-light performance:

It becomes pretty clear in the first video that moire/aliasing is about the same as it has been. That's slightly disappointing -- more so than the marginal improvement in sharpness for the Canon 5D Mark III. Canon is definitely drawing a line in the sand, and only particular models above a certain price range will see improvements in that area. Where is that line? It's hard to say, but at the moment it's at the $3,500 level.

As far as noise is concerned, there is a slight improvement, and there is a lot less chroma noise in the T4i than in the Canon 7D.So what's the verdict? If you've got a T2i, T3i, 60D, or 7D, and you don't need the noise improvement or want to buy new lenses for autofocus, you'll probably be better off sticking with your current camera. If you've never bought a camera before, or you have a DSLR without video capabilities, this is definitely one to consider.

If you're curious what the autofocus performance is like, here's a video showing off that ability:

There is a face-tracking function that might provide better results, but at the moment is seems like it is designed only as a convenience feature, not necessarily to be used in a situation where you need perfect focus. It will be interesting to see what Canon does next with their line, as there are rumors that they will be replacing a number of the cameras this year.

If you want to buy the T4i, you can do so from the links below:

Links:

[via cinema5D]

Your Comment

24 Comments

Holiday t3i markdowns may be worth your while.

June 15, 2012

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moebius22

For god's sakes what's happening to Panasonic? Why can"t they just do something about the GH2? Under the nose of the GH2 Canon has released the 5D MK III, C300, C500, T3i, T4i amongst several other family models.

Can anyone here volunteer a true situation at Panasonic. Is their R&D failing or what?

June 15, 2012

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Frank

Most likely this year.

June 15, 2012

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moebius22

Well - what's more incredible is that the GH2 still dominates over most of that lineup (the mk. iii and C300/500 excepted, obviously).

The biggest surprise is that Panasonic, even with such a clear winner, hasn't figured out how to compete against Canon's marketing.

June 15, 2012

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Hummer

And what surprises me even more about both those companies, is they continue to allow a handful of unassisted hackers show up their entire firmware engineering departments as toothless nincompoops.

Crippleware as a concept has maybe 18 more months of sustainability in the camera world. Not just the hackers, but Blackmagic et al. will disrupt those plans into oblivion. The jig is up.

June 15, 2012

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Peter

The GH2 is still easily better than the 5DIII... and IMO actually, even the C300. The C300 footage has always just looked like large-sensor XF footage to me. Never been blown away by it.

August 7, 2012

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bwhitz

The moire and Aliasing should have been a basic fix. Canon is doing some really strange tiering of their products. You want autofocus = T4i. You want no moire / aliasing = 5D3. You want 4K = 1D-C (shipping ???). You want 1080p 60fps? Sorry doesn't exist. You want a 4:2:2 codec = C300. You want to use both EOS and PL mount lenses? Then buy the 2 different models of C300. You want RAW? C500

Basically, they want you to buy 8 different cameras of theirs to cover specific situations. Who can really afford that? Can't they come out with a camera that can at least do several different task well? Kind of like the FS700, which will demolish Canon in sales.

June 15, 2012

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Gene Sung

June 20, 2012

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only pu**ies worry about auto focus when shooting video.

June 15, 2012

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With the amount of focus hunting I've seen in online videos, I think there are many who would benefit from autofocus implemented correctly. Sony might actually have done the best job with the FS700 - it's pretty remarkable how good it is. If you're shooting slow motion, especially with that camera, every time you miss focus or are late to pull, it's much more exaggerated because you're seeing that moment last for longer. So it's not as simple as you say it is.

June 15, 2012

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Joe Marine
Editor-at-Large
Shooter/Writer/Director

So you just shoot in 60p and then slow it down in post? I never got the logic behind in-camera slow motion.

June 16, 2012

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john jeffreys

Oh, just remember the expanded framerates the FS700 has. never mind.

June 16, 2012

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john jeffreys

The amount of moire in those videos makes me want to vomit. Canon did absolutely NOTHING to improve the video image quality. What a disappointment.

Oh, well, even more reason to look forward to the GH3. I guess I'll be hanging onto my m4/3's lenses after all, as there is no camera under $3500 (e.g. the Mk. III) that beats the GH2. Still.

June 15, 2012

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Hummer

Boring.
I'm sick of DSLR's, just using the one I have (5d 2) but my next camera will surely be a proper cinema rig. Just sold my spare t2i yesterday too.

June 16, 2012

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john jeffreys

non-update

NEXT!!

June 16, 2012

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i have a question regarding getting the best image possible for post. i understand why one should turn down contrast for more dynamic range, but what's the reasoning behind turning down sharpening?

thanks in advance for the answer.

June 16, 2012

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Because you can basically blur out the shameful artifacting and moire produced by these messy low-end Canon DSLRs.

June 16, 2012

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Hummer

In-camera sharpening can introduce artifacts and it's better to be able to control the sharpening if you do want it. You can do this better in post. I don't mind shooting with a tick or so of in-camera sharpening, because I don't like adding in sharpening after if I have a choice.

June 16, 2012

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Joe Marine
Editor-at-Large
Shooter/Writer/Director

5D mk3's improved All-I codec is not available?

June 16, 2012

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Laurel

It is not, and there is no mention of whether the codec has B frames, which would certainly help compression.

June 16, 2012

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Joe Marine
Editor-at-Large
Shooter/Writer/Director

I think it is incredibly snobbish to stay that autofocus doesn't have a place. It absolutely does, when it is executed properly.

With that said, the autofocus of the T4i at the moment is pretty ugly. It's certainly not a feature I would encourage anyone looking for a camera in this range to spend the extra dough for. If it functioned better, maybe... but it's pretty bad right now.

As far as cameras in this range, the autofocus functionality of the GH2 is significantly better. At work, when shorthanded, we have shot a couple of long, slow slider moves with it, and focus kept sharp the whole time. As long as you don't move too fast, it works exceptionally well.

June 16, 2012

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David

the best auto-focus is the brain using the hand on the manual focus.

June 19, 2012

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john

Yeah, autofocus just doesn't work...no matter how fast the motors, sensors...etc...even if someone achieves a technologically perfect system...it doesn't work b/c you can't control what it's focusing on....it doesn't have a brain...the whole reason you need manual focus. Even with touch screen...you don't wanna just tap it b/c you need to feather it to make it smooth...every lens, from the amount of throw, to the length of the lens has a different feel...an automatic system can't feather it...and sometimes you want to make the transition slowly, so it's less jarring. On wider lenses, for example, a focus rack is very noticeable and distracting, so when you can, you disguise the rack with a well timed tilt or pan...etc...an AC or an operator can do this, often without even realizing theyre doing it..these types of things throw computers (until computers gain the intelligence to make art, and judge framing and timing and have a visual intelligence...)

June 24, 2012

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Daniel Mimura

Some friends and I made a Canon T4i 650D video test of long boarding. Check it out and let us know what you think.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJ1dGhSPu0M

October 29, 2012

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