Description image

Behind-The-Scenes on an 'Epic' Film: 'The Hobbit' Production Video #7

06.6.12 @ 3:51PM Tags : , , ,

While there has been some interesting debate about the future of filmmaking (higher frame rates vs. 3D), Peter Jackson has been busy shooting The Hobbit in 3D on RED Epics at 48fps. They’ve had some wonderful behind-the-scenes production videos that are not only fascinating for their in-depth look at the continuation of The Lord of the Rings series, but also give some insight into the way in which real sets function. It’s not always clear exactly what certain positions actually do when you’re watching the credits of a film, but in this seventh production video, we’re taken on the lot for The Hobbit, and get to see many of these important positions performing their duties.

The Hobbit: Production Video #7:

Rather than just reading about some of the more specialized positions in the credits, it’s fascinating to get to see many of them in action and in their element. A movie that’s working with hundreds of crew members takes amazing amounts of organization to pull off, and it’s essential that everyone knows their role to make things move smoothly (though we also know this isn’t limited to big sets — smaller sets need to be organized as well). It’s not often that there are 11 Assistant Directors working on a project, but that just gives you an idea of the massive scale of this film. If you haven’t seen the other production videos that Peter Jackson has posted, you should do so now at his Facebook page at the link below.

Link: The Hobbit Production Videos – Peter Jackson – Facebook

Related Posts

  1. 'The Hobbit' Continues Terrific Behind-the-Scenes Video Blogs with On-Location Shooting
  2. Peter Jackson Starts Shooting 'The Hobbit' at 48 FPS: Why 24P May Be on the Way Out
  3. Peter Jackson Shows Off 10 Minutes of 'The Hobbit,' 48FPS Isn't Looking Good

COMMENT POLICY

We’re all here for the same reason: to better ourselves as writers, directors, cinematographers, producers, photographers... whatever our creative pursuit. Criticism is valuable as long as it is constructive, but personal attacks are grounds for deletion; you don't have to agree with us to learn something. We’re all here to help each other, so thank you for adding to the conversation!

Description image 12 COMMENTS

  • john jeffreys on 06.6.12 @ 4:17PM

    Really love that waterproof camera rig that was essentially a floating box with a window and you push it along the river like a little boat. Genius. like a boat dolly. or something. i want to go make one now

  • The crew doing these (terrific, entertaining) behind-the-scenes videos is probably larger than most of our actual shooting crews. What a massive production!

  • Greenscreen and moving cameras, I wonder how they do it. They probably have huge computer programmes to sync the two but I wonder whether there is an easy (even if not so perfect) way to mix green screen with moving camera.

    • They have tracking points on the screen.

    • Everyone can do it with some tracking points and After Effects. If you want to have green screen an moving cameras in a live environment like in a news studio, you’ll need a vritual studio software and computers though – not cheap, but every other news show has one.

  • Loved it. Glad Peter Jackson is doing this. very fun to watch even though you know a movie of this scale can probably be frustrating at times.

  • While I’m more of an original trilogy kind of guy, one of the best behind-the-scenes as of late has been the Star Wars prequels.

    The one that stands out is called “Within A Munte” for Episode III, where Rick McCallom walks us through an hour long documentary on what it takes to get it from conception to finished product. Here’s a clip: http://youtu.be/PNyt4PLe2sE

    It covers *everything*, from accounting, to props, to editing, rotoscoping, catering for the set, and more. Really worth your time if you can get a hold of the the Episode III DVD.

  • I wish every film did these!

  • It’s probably redundant to say this, but the Lord of the Rings extended edition DVDs come with a humongous amount of special feature documentaries, literally 6 whole DVDs worth, covering all aspects of preproduction, shooting and postproduction. Inspiring stuff, and much recommended if you’ve not seen it before (even if you’re not a LOTR fan).