Superproducer Ted Hope on...

January 16, 2013

Speaking of Apple's Prices... Why Are They So Damn High?

More than anything, users appreciate the undeniable consistency (and therefore, customer confidence) that comes with any Apple machine or app. This applies to both consumers and professionals, though some of the latter may hesitate in days to come. Of course, achieving this consistency can be a double-edged sword -- the very measures that guarantee the quality you've come to know and respect of Apple computing are the same tendencies that see them labeled as "notoriously controlling." This too goes for the staunchly unwavering prices of Apple products across the marketplace -- that double-edged sword extends all the way out to how such pricing is so firmly set. And, in terms of sword metaphors, this is more often the kind that cuts a hole in your pocket than the kind that "slashes prices."

Let me be clear, I'm a long-time Apple user -- and fan, to a point within reason -- of both its hardware and software. Why is Apple the biggest thing in tech (read: "consumer tech," short for), anyway? Because its goods always work very, very well, and they look damn sexy doing it. Equivalent-or-better hardware or open extensibility are way secondary to elegant-but-robust functionality in sleek chic. The ways in which Apple all but brands the pricing into each and every polycarbonate shell for retail is no secret (or even all that sketchy) per se -- but it's certainly interesting. Basically, Apple uses some traditional business tactics in conjunction with each other, but to a whole other 'perfect storm' sort of success.

See first, Exhibit A: standard product, non-Apple -- which may get up to a 50% markup at retail, in turn allowing for a lot of variability (and discount-flavored marketability) with pricing. Then, see Exhibit B, from MacWorld:

Apple, however, extends only a tiny wholesale discount on its Macs and iPads to your retailer of choice. The actual numbers are a closely guarded secret, protected by confidentiality agreements between Cupertino and its resellers, but the difference probably amounts to only a few percentage points off the official price that you find at Apple’s own stores. With such a narrow gap to tinker with, most retailers can’t offer big discounts and still hope to turn a profit.

The shorthand: Apple doesn't cut anyone any breaks in wholesale -- the price virtually can't go down without retailers going under (or at least, losing on every Mac deal). The catch: Why not markup higher for larger profit? Well, because then you'd be the only store in town able to advertise "Highest Mac Prices in Town!"

This is where the second part of Apple’s retail strategy kicks in: The company supplements its tiny wholesale discounts to resellers with more substantial monetary incentives that are available only if those resellers advertise its products at or above a certain price, called the “minimum advertised price” (MAP). This arrangement enables retailers to make more money per sale, but it prevents them from offering customers significant discounts, resulting in the nearly homogeneous Apple pricing we are used to.

The shorthand: Retailers may pay less per unit on each order, therefore standing to make a higher profit -- but only if the unit goes for however much Apple wants. The catch: Between this rock and that hard place, why carry Apple goods at all? Well, because the demand is so great, you'd be the only store in town able to advertise "Lowest Mac Prices in Town -- Because We Don't Sell Any Macs!" (Drivers-by may only read the top of the sign, and then sue you for false advertisement by their own error).

As it fittingly turns out, the way Apple can ensure a viable cost-to-profit margin -- and a therefore sustainable "work great, be sexy" business model -- is to keep prices as consistent as the performance of its devices themselves. It all echoes that absolute, pain-staking level of quality control. And with that invariable price comes a product of invariably high quality, to be sure -- but since the body governing how much it costs virtually everywhere may be somewhat biased toward the product, the real worth is determined by the user. Whether you actually get what you pay for is up for you to decide -- as is which platform you return to or depart from when it comes time to upgrade to the next generation.

[Update:] By the way, my first smartphone will likely be an Android -- how about you guys? Is anyone quitting Apple and never looking back -- because of things like price, or not? Is anyone else taking the mid-ground, and going for whatever the best deal for performance may be?

Link: How Apple sets its prices -- MacWorld

[via Gizmodo]

Your Comment

96 Comments

Hmm...

January 16, 2013

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Soosan Khanoom

"Whether you actually get what you pay for is up for you to decide..."

So, your conclusion is arbitrary? Cool story, bro.

As for the misnomer that their products "works great...", I have almost two decades of significant experience on both pre-eminent video production platforms and this argument holds no water.

The only measurement left then is the "... looks sexy." factor, which is more about ideology than about technology. And that is something I can't really argue with any merit so I can will leave you with a thought. If you are buying a product made by a company that has the type of business model that Apple propagates, you might have more dollars than sense.

January 16, 2013

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Judge

Hey bro -- the main ideas here are the business tactics, but if you don't appreciate the fact that one can do with this information what one will as a (hopefully, and perhaps as of now) informed consumer, well, I'm at least glad you took the time to read to the end. As for two decades of experience, which I of course respect, I was speaking of the more latter-day Apple, as in the one which has the most to do with the filmmaking/social realms -- though the 'working great' and 'sexiness' aspects apply pretty well to all of the present-day products I've tried. What shortcomings these devices have apparently isn't to the dissatisfaction of the general consumer -- I hope I don't have to explain what I mean here.

I apologize for not telling you what (or how, even) to take away from all of this, given the arbitrary conclusion. I will tell you that I removed a pretty considerable number of words from this post that would have, in my eyes, colored the whole thing as a bit too Apple-hating. Apple is a business, a well-run one, and one that makes good products. To avoid total support of a business model the likes of which Apple propagates, please see the Hackintosh section. That said, I feel like 'being a bit too Apple-hating' is exactly what you're really doing in commenting here -- and I suppose I can respect that too?

January 16, 2013

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Dave Kendricken
Writer
Freelancer

Holds no water? I've owned Apple hardware going back to their first edition of the Mac. I've also been among those that were required to use Windows-based hardware while working for companies that lived in the Windows world. There's no comparison. As I was required to replace one poorly designed/manufactured windows clone after another. It was an annual ritual. In the meantime, I still have that working "vintage" original Mac, my first PowerBook, my 3G desktop, even my Apple Newton is still plugging away as it did when it was new. The main reason for upgrading in all cases was improvement in specifications and processor speed. I've gladly paid the price for quality and reliability. Because they work and are MUCH easier to use. Going into my 4th decade of experience with Apple hardware, I'd say this part of the argument holds a significant amount of the water!

January 16, 2013

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Photogoofer

Also, why do apple products in average cost 30% more outside the US then within? To my knowledge the actual products are not even built in the US so what is the point? Taking the Euro as an example, it looks like Apple converts dollars to euros at a 1 / 1 conversion rate when it should actually be 1.3 / 1.
The sad truth is there is hardly any good alternative, because while I am not a fan of apple and where it is heading, using Microsoft products usually drives me to the edge of insanity...

January 16, 2013

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errr... true but it happens with many many brands and not only Apple (Canon, Sony, Panasonic, etc...). It was always cheaper to buy electronic products in the US than in the EU (I don't know why but probably it has to do with TAX policy regarding electronics. I've bought a GoPro Hero3 last week (in New York) for 399$ USD (which translates roughly to 320€ while here in Portugal where I live it sells for 460€.

January 16, 2013

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Yes its all about tax. Europe has a VAT (value added tax) on just about everything you buy which is usually about 25%. Not to mention other random taxes on electronics. Hard drives for example just got an extra tax in Sweden for some unknown reason....murica!

January 16, 2013

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kevin

Within Europe you find diferences in prices, here in spain Apple computers are about 200€ more expensive than for example Germany. I know most of brands do that, but why different prices within the same "territory"?? I don't get it, anyway here in Spain our VAT (here is called IVA) it's on the 21% :)

January 16, 2013

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Jesus

Probably those import taxes. Apparently the cheapest place to buy lenses in Europe is Poland, from what my friends tell me they are closeish to US prices

January 16, 2013

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kevin

I think so..but travelling to poland or other country to buy lenses....is quite expensive then :)

January 16, 2013

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Jesus

Not really ... With WizzAir, Poland is 20€ away ;)

January 16, 2013

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As for desktop computers, I would always go for a custom built Windows machine. More performance, less expensive.

As for laptops, I've searched hours for an equivalent of the MacBook Pro 15 retina. I haven't found anything that could come close at that price point, in fact at any price point. Whatever you pick, you have to make concessions at either mobility, screen quality and / or performance.
The only thing that can match the performance and screen of the Macbook (or probably outdo in terms of color rendition, not the resolution) is an HP Elitebook with Dreamcolor, which costs at least twice as much and weighs a ton. Also it turns your legs into hot sausages.

January 16, 2013

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Mischa

Not sure how this article helps me make a film...

But, I'll bite.
I'm an Apple user - because I am a graphic designer and when I started out in 2000, you couldn't really go cross-platform due to fonts and other concerns. You wanted to be a designer, you had to be Apple.

No, Macs don't "just work". I get less bothersome crap on my mac about codecs etc than I do on Windows, but then I've had 3 hard drives fail - 2 in an imac and 1 in a Mac Pro.
My Cinema HD monitor also failed.

I pay the extra because I'm a pro and Apple catered to me.
Now all they care about is the lifestyle users, so I may switch at some point.

January 16, 2013

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Fresno Bob

Fresno Bob -- I'm sorry to hear of your troubles, especially with the drives. I can't say for certainty that "Apple's improved the hardware failure rates since 2000," nor do I care to. What I can say is that I'm writing this comment from a 5-year-old Macbook Pro that, at this point, has little to no reason remaining to live -- and yet it does. A friend of mine who worked for the Apple Store about 2 years ago gave me a diagnostic on the house, and told me my mama-board had but a year left until... well, you know. I'm sure my first MBP07-'posthumous' comment will be something of an occasion.

As for helping you make a film, well, perhaps this information influences what you'll go for in a new editing machine. As for switching, I say do it.

January 16, 2013

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avatar
Dave Kendricken
Writer
Freelancer

sure... everything electronic/mechanic is bound to fail at some point the difference being how many times does it fail. having both macs and pc's in my post-prod facilities I can tell you that if you were a PC user that hardware failure list would be a lot more extensive (and I mean A LOT!). And this is just hardware... if you were to compare software/os crashes than that difference would be even bigger.

January 16, 2013

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This is an odd argument, because unlike Apple products, PCs can come from a variety of sources and combinations. It's not as simple of an outlook. Are we talking HP hybrids, Dells, Gateways, Lenovos? They're all different mixtures and only certain parts are compatible (like GPUs and processors).
Apple has an advantage that their parts are all they same unless a new manufacturer joins their "family". However you could've done the same with choosing a specific PC manufacturer or, the pride and joy of PC'ing, customize your own. Is it any wonder why the comparison of PC vs Apple= Manual vs Automatic gear shift exists?

January 16, 2013

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I've always looked at like this :

iLife is not free.

And further, give me a mac without iLife for $300 bucks cheaper. Coz to be honest i don't need it.

January 16, 2013

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While I don't like their direction of travel, staying with FCP7, I've just bought a second hand mac pro 2.93Ghz 4,1 for about half the price I bought the equivalent 1,1 I bought in '07. And it's not cos "they just work, look sexy", but when they stop working, I can fix them myself, any problem I've had I've found the same problem and a cure online. Windows/Microsoft machines you basically have to take it somewhere, pay and wait for its return.

For that i'll pay a premium, and pay for Mac Book pro and 3GS, now 4S.

January 16, 2013

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Chris

Ugh, FCP 7? You're just crippling yourself by staying with that ancient piece of software.

It's time to move up, either to CS6 or to FCP X. Seriously.

January 16, 2013

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Swested

I have FCPX (and don't really mind it too much), but have never once used it in a professional setting. My time is spent in FCP7, Premiere CS6 and AVID (AVID being a long time standard, and Premiere popping up more and more). FCP7 is still a standard in a ton of production studios here in NYC, because of the great initial investment they made to begin with.

January 16, 2013

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alex

@ Chris - that's not a premium your paying - its a 'stupid' tax apple base their entire business around! ;-)

PC's are hands down the easiest to build, run and maintain both software / hardware wise. Add to that the complete freedom of being able to mix and match ANY components as required and choosing a PC over a mac is a no-brainer!

January 16, 2013

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Peter

for me the question is: are Apple products REALLY more expensive than PC's? I really don't think so... when analysing a price one has to consider many factors and not only the price tag. I've bought my first (personal) mac in 2003, a G5 tower with a 23" cinema display. This combo was a whopping 5000$ at the time. In 2005 I managed to buy my first Apple laptop, a macbook pro 17" for around 3000$. In 2009 I replaced my macbook pro for the new unibody models for 2000$.

So this is a total of 10000$ invested in Apple hardware over the course of 10 years (around 1000$ per year).

What about my hardware? Well... the G5 served me well until the last update of FCP stopped running on Lion. It has many many hours of hardcore intensive HDCAM SR editing under it's belt (back in 2003 HDCAM was the only way to shoot HD which means 440Mbps 12bit 4:4:4 footage). It is now used as network server.
My first macbook performed flawlessly over the course of it's life, editing on the field and travelling with me through Africa, Brazil and Asia, handling proxy versions of the HDCAM footage without complaining.

What about my new Macbook Pro? Well, since now I shoot about 90% of my films on DSLR/C300 I realised I don't need "heavy" machinery and I have to thank Apple for that. So now I edit my work on a Macbook Pro, connected to my 2003 23'' Cinema Display (yeah, it still works and is hands down the best monitor I've ever had) and an array of RAID5 GTECH hard drives.

Does this "look" a "professional" set up? Of course not... Does it perform well enough so that I can trust it with my professional work? Sure does!!!

So... in conclusion: if anyone out there has done or thinks it's possible to do the same thing with a PC workflow just let me know.

January 16, 2013

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Oh boy. Of course it is. Probably for half the price.

January 16, 2013

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jake

You need to know that Microsoft subsidizes most PC manufacturers which lowers the cost of many models. Without this form of welfare PC's would:
1. Be higher priced
2. Have crap hardware
3. Be higher priced with crap hardware

It's all about market share for Bill Gates and the Nazi's of the North. Without providing corporate welfare to manufacturing, MS looses long term gains from future MS software purchases, upgrades and support. MS is about locking you into a false sense of value. In my world and the real world of professional creators, apple products pay for themselves in one project.

January 16, 2013

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ThunderBolt

The name Bill Gate's should never be used in the same sentence as Nazi. The man is doing amazing work with the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation. We're talking about computers, let's keep the conversation grounded.

January 16, 2013

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alex

No worries, both feet were firmly placed on the ground when I wrote this. Gates Foundation has little do do with MS, Entirely different entities, I think you can agree. Fact is, Bill has little to do with MS. So I stand by my characterization for those who make products based on buggy, spaghetti code and who also buy and then destroy good tech companies. These Socialist can only survive in mediocrity.

January 16, 2013

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ThunderBolt

Then why did i build my new PC for $1500, with specs that ran +$2,000 from all the PC makers? A little bit of research and its amazing what you find. I have built my Gaming/Work PC and my HTPC with guidance from http://www.hardware-revolution.com. I really hope Apple learns to embrace the Hackentosh crowd and adds actual support for it, I might actually use them if they ever did.

January 17, 2013

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Lazy

Jake, I honestly think you don't know what you're talking about. 10 years ago there was no "off the shelf" PC on earth that could handle HDCAM SR. Back then you had three options: go for a high end "proprietary" editing system (like Quantel) which meant a few thousand bucks; take the AVID route (still more expensive than Apple and with an outdated software); buy yourself a "cheap" G5 tower, shove a Blackmagic HD card/ HD Link combo in there and install a little piece of software called Final Cut Pro that could handle up to eight streams of HDCAM SR in real time and still provide you with color accurate, pixel by pixel, 1080p real time monitoring (plus all the scopes and histograms). To have all this for 5000$ in a system that NEVER crashed was truly revolutionary and a real eye-opener for many companies. Oh, and for an extra 500$ you could have Shake, that was pretty much the industry standard compositing software back then.

Nowadays you can do pretty much the same thing with a 1500$ iMac and 300$ FCPX.

Expensive? I think not...

January 16, 2013

1
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fernando

Yes, imac represents incredible value for money. Super fast, awesome monitor, reliable, great software. Also, you can edit 4k R3D in realtime... all on an imac. If price is an issue by an imac. Simples.

January 16, 2013

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Stevie P

@peter

No. It's called sick of paying someone to fix the PC I had before it, you cannot afford to lose 2-3weeks, every 3months, when relying on it as a video editing machine, for paid work. You can only use "my machine is down" & missing deadlines, so often before a client marks you as unreliable.

Apple gear was not superior, but it was reliable, and when rarely going wrong, easily fixed when it did. Neither stupid nor a fan boy. Certainly not a fan boy since FCPX arrived.

January 16, 2013

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Chris

I guess that was just bad luck. I haven't had a single problem with my PC gear in years. Also, Windows has come a long way since W95. Nowadays it really is stable, fast and easy to use, even for Mac users;)

January 16, 2013

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jake

Apple controls prices.

January 16, 2013

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moebius22

Hasn't this been re-hashed a million times over by now? Still, I'll bite:

I've had Macs since 1991, and keep buying them. I don't begrudge a small premium every couple of years on the tools I use to make a living; it's like a builder buying a better hammer. Several tools I use and enjoy are Mac-only, which makes it an easy decision, and I can run Windows in virtualization (for checking websites in IE) or by dual-booting (for gaming). Retina displays are awesome, too.

In summary: they're easier to use and maintain, run unique software, and you pay a premium up-front which you may or may not recoup in reduced ongoing costs. Fair enough.

January 16, 2013

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Sorry, but this post is sub-standard. Apple makes tools, good tools are not cheap tools and so may cost more than a subsidized PC with patches placed on generations on patches. I don't think anyone can forget Windows Vista. As far as their marketing/business/vendor strategies go; who cares, really? What's the point to speculate about business practices? This feels like a PC guy making statements about how apple will never survive, it's worn out and will never be. Quality comes with a price and quality has helped provide me the life I always felt I deserved. I don't know of a successful creative that doesn't produce on apple.

January 16, 2013

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ThunderBolt

I make more than enough money off of production work than to obsess over a difference in a few hundred dollars over the course of every 2-3 years. I just prefer the overall build quality and form factor of Mac portables; I also prefer working in OS X although I will admit that Windows 7 is fine for most purposes.

I'm a bit nervous about their future direction (where size and form takes precedence over function), but if they can release an outstanding Mac Pro, I'd buy it in a heartbeat.

January 16, 2013

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Swested

I am a laptop coordinator at school which has over 600 laptops (MB Airs, MB Pros, MacBooks) and 50 iMacs and two Mac Pros. I am also an Apple certified repair tech and we do all repairs in house.......repairing machines is the thing I do LEAST at my job. Most repairs I do are from student accidental damage.

I don't even want to think about supporting 600 PC's running W7 in the hands of teenagers

January 16, 2013

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Ranger9913

Interesting story. I've been on a Mac since 1999. Just recently (because of FCP and a lack of updates not to mention price) I have switched to a PC (I had built). In my observation comparing the new build to the Macs I've owned, It's safe to say if you want a turn Key system without any hitches get the Mac. True you're spending more, but The fact is you're getting less power. i need the power now so a PC for me was the only way to go. I'll admit there were some issues with my new build, I've rma'd the motherboard, Replaced my hard drives and video card and now happy to report my PC is working flawlessly at the moment (fingers crossed) It was very frustrating in the beginning, I definitely questioned my decision realizing this is something I've never had to deal with on my Macs. So I'll conclude If you want a powerful system and have the patience to deal with possible issues that might occur a building a PC is probably your best choice at the moment. I tried to go Mac but it just didn't add up. I'm sorry for that, I love Mac products but its obvious their direction is geared more towards the general public than professionals.

January 16, 2013

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Anthony Marino

I've always used Windows and don't even think about it anymore. Years ago there was a constant nagging fear that something would go wrong. Now it just works. Oh, and when recently I decided to upgrade my NVidia graphics card for faster CS6 speed, one thumbscrew opened the case, old card out, new card in and a few minutes later I was editing ripsh*t fast. Less gear, more art.

January 16, 2013

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I understand wanting to build a hackintosh to get a really high spec machine for less money. But it sometimes seem people are trying really hard to make Apple incomprehensible. We know Apple computers are designed to always be the same price. This has been true for decades. Every year or two you get a much better computer for the same price which never goes down. We also know Apple is in the hardware business - not software, not selling music, not the App store - hardware. That's where they make their money. This is key despite the fact that most of us buy Macs for OS X. Which explains the hackintosh impulse.

Note that Apple is *nothing* at all like the Windows PC business which is based on a spectrum of types of self-built hardware, incidentally made of the same components Apple uses, but at commodity prices. The PC market is and always will be a kind of semi-commodity market. In other words, it's about price - specifically cheap. Business-wise, it's a race to the bottom. I don't see that it makes sense to beat Apple with the stick of commodity hardware. They are different worlds and markets. What people often seem to demand from Apple runs completely counter to the premise and proposition of the company. Aside from which, the total cost of ownership (think viruses) for a Mac is very competitive - and it's cheaper than broadband! (or a phone line, or mobile networking.) Apple software is about 75% cheaper than competitors like Adobe now too.

January 16, 2013

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well everybody tries to xplain why their decisions is better than others but men yours is delusional

January 16, 2013

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yinkadesigncode

Well said sir! Bang on the money.

January 16, 2013

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Stevie P

I'm of the group who looks for the best deal available. I've been using a Mac for the majority of my serious editing projects for the last six years because of the fact that it runs Industry-standard platforms, but if I could find an equally stable and more cost-effective alternative, I'd take it. I've considered building a Hacktintosh but I'm not that tech savvy in terms of assembling disparate parts. Though, given the recent article about Apple-quality displays, it may be possible to build something comparable or more powerful than a Mac Pro for cheaper.

By the way, my smartphone is an Android, but not because of some agenda against Apple; it was a gift.

January 16, 2013

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DIYFilmSchool.net

For me, running Photoshop or Premiere is exactly the same on a PC or a Mac. 2 years ago I was able to spec out a sweet Dell XPS system w 16G RAM and it rarely, if ever, hiccups during video editing. Not to mention I can have 4 or 5 CPU-labor-intensive apps running all at once with no problems whatsoever. An equivalent MAC system would have cost twice as much.

HOWEVER, this past year, I dropped my PC laptop and cracked the motherboard so it was time to get a new laptop anyway. I decided to give Macs another go-round. Why? Because the prices had really come back where they needed to be, because the machine is all-aluminum, because there are rare virus issues, and as a bonus, the MAC OS has finally blossomed with the marriage to better Intel processors. The OS environment is so FAR above, and so much more sophisticated than Windows that it's difficult for me to work on my desktop machine now. In fact, I leave Photoshop or Premiere open all the time on my desktop so I don't have to look at that godawful Windows OS. The latest Mac OS is just vastly superior and smarter.

One final note: I was able to pick up a 17" refurbished MBPro, and thank god I did. Why did Mac stop making these? The screens are beautiful and I hate editing on anything smaller...

I still believe that all systems are just tools to get done what you need to get done. But it's a lot more satisfying to do it in a Mac setup these days. They are firing on all cylinders.

January 16, 2013

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Brad

As for as smart phones, I love the iphone. Why? Because when it breaks at can be fixed. Every non-apple product I've owned phone wise (Samsung, HTC) has broken, and then been thrown away and replaced. They just work correctly, always. I feel the same about tablets (ipad vs ___ ) and laptops.

Desktops are now a completely different conversation, as we all know. I'm halfway between hackintosh and a windows build. I love my imac, but it's not close to powerful enough now. The new 27" is great looking, but it's really just a giant macbook when you crack it open. MacPros are a huge mess right now. Tough decisions to be made for freelance editors.

January 16, 2013

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alex

I love the Mac operating system. I wouldn't care less about the 'sexy' factor. This is why i've built a Hackointosh instead of buying an iMac.

I've had an iPhone and an iPad, but I almost immediately sold them and bought an Android equivalent.

I hate where Apple (and Microsoft for that matter) are going with their mobile devices. And they are extending this into their main operating system.

I want a workstation on which I can do 'work', not being restricted to what Apple allows me and the application developers to do.

Maybe I should be looking into Linux in the future, with lightworks, if it ever comes out.

January 16, 2013

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Sam

My first computer was an Apple IIgs. I moved to a IIc. I loved that you cold plug any Apple peripheral into it and it would work the first time. Then I decided I wanted to run a bbs system. Apple fail. No software. What hardware out there had to be modified to work. I switched to a Microsoft platform, cursed it because nothing plugged into it worked the first time, but it was very flexible; I could make it work and, to the limit of my ability, hack it together. So, I like Apple because they run well, but I have never owned an Apple computer because of the lack of flexibility. My phone is an Android just because I can hack it.

January 16, 2013

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Stewart

Some heated discussions going on here, eh?

Though I feel the article was essentially asking, 'do you subscribe/support the business model of apple?', I could already see the storm clouds gathering...

I'm a PC guy. Boom. I said it. I don't hate Apple and I'm versed on most NLE's (Avid, Fcp, Adobe, Vegas) and a handful of subsidiary post production programs. Why don't I use, what is very much fact, a more reliable/more intuitive system, ie. Apple? /plays the little violin/

It's like wanting to have the fastest car on the road; yeah, if I could afford a lambo I'd get one, but instead ill super charge the hemi on a rusted Plymouth I bought off my uncle. It's got a ton of guts.for a fraction of the cost but it may not handle so well and you definitely have to feather the clutch (and a million other nuances) to get the most of it.

As a business minded young man, applause to Apple. They create a good product, market it better than anyone else and make a killing on the books.

As a budget filmmaker, applause to PC for creating the next best thing that I can afford.

/comment written on an Android.

January 16, 2013

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Brock

I know little about computers, but I do know the macs I've used that have equal or even a little less power on paper are significantly quicker and more reliable than the PC's I use. The monster PC editing stations with 12 core's and 24+ gigs of ram have a new issue EVERY DAY. Apple computers just work, and they work damn well. That's the end all for me. The price is a hard bandaid to pull off, but worth it in the long run.

January 16, 2013

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Tyler Larson

I writhe in terror that I may, one day, be forced to use a PC to get my work done. Perhaps, with a little luck, I will die before that day comes.

January 16, 2013

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dixter

I have had two android phones one rooted with a custom OS. Switched to an iphone a few months ago and enjoy it more.

Tablet front included one android based tab, then an ipad 3 which wins hands down. Better color, res, and usability.

Have built PCs from scratch for myself since the beginning. Yes I lived through Vista?! Pain in the a**.
When it came time to upgrade my 07 laptop took a chance and went mac. Cost was justifiable at the time considering my options. I still use a windows 7 based desktop as my main machine. And it works albeit lots of headaches are involved. I find myself fixing more problems on windows than I do the mac. But still doing most of my editing on the PC. What works for me wont for others just adding to the conversation.

January 16, 2013

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Jared

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