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May 6, 2013

Adobe Ends Creative Suite, New Software Versions Will Only Be Available Through Creative Cloud

Adobe Creative Cloud DiscountAbout a year ago, Adobe announced that they were going to be offering subscriptions for their software through what they were calling Creative Cloud. Besides being a monthly subscription instead of a one-time fee, Creative Cloud also offers other advantages like being able to view and share work from any device through specific applications. Back in March, Adobe killed off boxed versions of the Creative Suite, suggesting that they were going to move away from CS altogether, and starting in June, they're doing just that: future versions of Creative Suite will only be available through Creative Cloud. Click through for more from Adobe on the announcement.

This is what Adobe said on their site:

In order to accelerate the rate at which we deliver new features and services, and to ensure that we do so with the highest level of quality, we are focusing all of our efforts on Creative Cloud.

Given this, the CC applications will be available only as part of Creative Cloud. We will continue to sell and support Adobe Creative Suite® 6 applications, and will provide bug fixes and security updates as necessary. We do not, however, have any current plans to release new versions of our CS applications.

You will continue to install and use the creative applications on your desktop just as you always have, but the apps will increasingly be part of a larger creative process centered on Creative Cloud.

Premiere, Photoshop, InDesign, Dreamweaver, and Illustrator will all be branded as CC applications going forward, and the only way you're going to be able to purchase them is through the Creative Cloud. The big difference between owning the software and purchasing through Creative Cloud is that if you decide to stop paying the subscription for a period of time, you no longer have access to the software.

Adobe also announced that they are going to integrate Behance into their applications more heavily:

With this update, creative files can be stored, synced and shared, via Creative Cloud, on Mac OS, Windows, iOS and Android; and Behance, the world’s leading online creative community, is integrated with Creative Cloud, so customers can showcase work, get feedback on projects and gain global exposure.

Adobe is currently doing 30 day free trials, but their plans range from $20-$50 depending on the option you choose and the length of the contract. Adobe still plans to support CS6 and allow you to purchase that version, but it will be all Creative Cloud from now on for new versions.

[Update]: Since many are asking about it, I'm adding this from their FAQ on Creative Cloud:

Do I need ongoing Internet access to use my Creative Cloud desktop applications?

No. Your Creative Cloud desktop applications (such as Photoshop and Illustrator) are installed directly on your computer, so you won't need an ongoing Internet connection to use them on a daily basis.

You will need to be online when you install and license your software. If you have an annual membership, you'll be asked to connect to the web to validate your software licenses every 30 days. However, you'll be able to use products for 180 days even if you're offline.

Links:

[via Digital Photography Review]

Disclosure: Adobe is a No Film School advertiser.

Your Comment

191 Comments

Can't blame them, this will help end piracy. On the other hand it may destroy part of their market (those who prefer physical versions). I'm a proud user of creative cloud so I'm cool with this.

May 6, 2013

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Not to forget ending piracy will destroy the market of those who can’t afford their software. People aren’t born as professionals and their student versions aren’t cheap enough for everyone to start with. Apart from that their software is not really worth the money unless they iron out a bunch of major bugs and minor annoyances.

May 6, 2013

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"destroy the market of those who can’t afford their software." <- It's not a market if people aren't buying it...

I think it's a smart move. It's not like they're the only people who make editing software and they have a right to get paid for making software which is so widely used in the industry.

May 6, 2013

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Danny

Well it is not a market, but these users are the ones who will eventually become the buyers, and whatever system they have come to prefer is the one they will use and (when they eventually end up in decision making positions) prefer. Avid is going to go the way of the dodo because few students or independents are able to use it. making piracy impossible (while offering to free/cheap version) is probably the best way to wringe out maximum bucks short term, but also the best way to ensure long term decline.
The future belongs to companies like Blackmagic's who understands (with for example DaVinci's pricing model) the need to not only charge big studios for what they can afford, but also making sure to expand their market.

May 7, 2013

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Frankhy

That being said however, I think the Adobe solution may work, if students and independents can go on and off the subscription as their needs change. People who do not use the software constantly (like students) would certainy benefit from such an as-needed approach, instead of being face dwith the equally ridiculous options of using pirated software or pay the same price as a 6 digit earning full time power user.

May 7, 2013

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Frankhy

You will always find old versions of CSs on web, and thats enough for learning. And if you really need that ultra roto brush and mega warp stabilizer, you probably can afford it. Not a big deal at all.

May 6, 2013

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" destroy the market of those who can’t afford their software"

That market is called thieves. Don't kid yourself. It's stealing plain and simple.

May 6, 2013

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Jonesy

But what other options do high school kids have? When I was thirteen, my parents never would have financed me a 240$ yearly subscription, just for me to "play around" with professional software. But with not a lot of alternatives out there (especially for AE) I don't know if I ever would have gotten into the vfx industry without having used the Adobe CS for so many years. Either, the open source community has to react and fill the hole, or Adobe might run out of customers on the long run. I absolutely believe that almost every now-customer of Adobe at some point in their lives have tried there software long before buying - and for longer than 30 days.

May 7, 2013

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Haiggoh

For something to *ever* be stolen there would have to be a loss by someone. Welcome to the digital age, where everything isn't black and white anymore! :)

May 7, 2013

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TK

For businesses this will be great as everything will always be up to date. For the rest if us it might kind if suck. I compare it to leasing a car vs buying a car. When you buy a car, the payments eventually stop, with a lease you just upgrade to a new car but keep paying.

I'd like to not add another monthly bill that I have to keep track of. Seems like they are doing to physical media what apple did to fcp7, but will people be just as upset about it for the next two years?

May 7, 2013

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Julian

This isn't about piracy. This is about Adobe getting paid every month.

May 6, 2013

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mitch

How would this end piracy? It's still a program installed on your computer, which is installed via an installer, which means it can be hijacked and pirated. If it needs to phone home every so often to validate, things like that can be bypassed via adding loopback IPs in the hosts file.... unless I'm missing something here?

May 7, 2013

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Clayton Arnall

I believe I said "help end", not It WILL end.

May 7, 2013

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This won't end piracy. Pirates always win.

May 7, 2013

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and if you don't have an internet connection?

May 6, 2013

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Seriously? What if you don't have an internet connection? The only way that this could apply is if you are part of a segregated, higher security institution like the government, some schools, and other enterprises that try to restrict your internet access.

Even then, they mentioned during the Keynote that there would be ways to work with the CC apps.

May 6, 2013

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Robert Thorpe

Many editing systems I’ve seen weren’t connected to the internet. As far as I‘m aware that’s not totally uncommon.

May 6, 2013

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for god's sake, how many times does adobe have to say this ? you don't need to be network'd to use the apps ... just to download the software and updates.

May 6, 2013

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sjk

You MUST connect to adobe.com every 30 days even if you prepaid for a year. This is a problem if you are doing field editing on doc footage in the 3rd world, on a boat on the amazon, etc. Maybe and edge case for most, but still...

May 7, 2013

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Kevin

You just need an internet connection to download and update the software

May 6, 2013

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Gareth

Then you might as well just give up on having any career involving technology.

May 6, 2013

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Hummer

Guys you only need an internet connection to download and update the apps. You can work offline if you want. Say you work in a price without internet, just buy Creative Cloud when you do have access and then use if offline later. No big deal.

May 6, 2013

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Sorry guys, but has anyone of you actually read the full article??

"If you have an annual membership, you’ll be asked to connect to the web to validate your software licenses every 30 days. However, you’ll be able to use products for 180 days even if you’re offline."

May 7, 2013

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georg

georg is correct.

May 10, 2013

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It's up to them, but I hope this is not the road all editing programs take.

May 6, 2013

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Saied

Actually, I'm being too reasonable - I hope they suffer for this.

May 6, 2013

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Saied

Offline users can go f themselves, right?

May 6, 2013

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Natt

I understand their move. They've obviously done the research!! Say no more.

May 6, 2013

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Darren Wolff

Horrible for offline Studiosystems. We don't have a connection to the internet so we don't get leaks and viruses and shit.
If you can use it without having a connection, its fine (just download it on another PC). But if not......well thanks :(

May 6, 2013

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Rob

"Leaks and viruses and shit"? Do you have 12 year olds running your workstations?

May 6, 2013

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Hummer

Rob,
Have the studio talk to your VAR or reseller and ask them about the Enterprise edition of Creative Cloud. Perhaps they have a solution.

Kevin

May 10, 2013

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Re: "If you don't have an internet connection," I do not think you need a persistent internet connection to use Creative Cloud. I believe it checks once a month if you are a current customer. So, yes, you'll need internet once in a while, but not always-on by any means.

May 6, 2013

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avatar
Ryan Koo
Founder
Writer/Director

Yeah, again, they have a few different solutions for this. During their keynote they mentioned internet restricted enterprises, organization and institutions will be able to access CC apps using their workaround. They didn't go into detail, but it didn't sound like it would be a problem.

May 6, 2013

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Robert Thorpe

Not to say cheating is a good thing to do but you could probably just block the monthly checks if you edit your host files to block adobe, but you would need it for the first activation.

May 6, 2013

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Derek

Its a dream for anyone who can't or doesn't want to shell out a ton of cash to use some pretty serious programs. I've been using the CS 4 months now (I have everything at my finger tips) and for the 200 it cost me so far it's been worth it. Plus who needs to shell out a ton of cash for software right now? There's way cheaper options out there to get the job done. Plus the second I can (and this is up to mac) I'm jumping back on the apple train. The windows operating system is like having a full time job. Its ridicules you gotta down load this, oops...gotta remove that, where did that come from?...etc etc It's a mess. Premieres ok. I just miss editing on a mac, this pc stuff is for the birds.

May 6, 2013

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Anthony Marino

Glad it's working out for you, Anthony. I think most people using Creative Cloud are very satisfied with it.

May 10, 2013

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I've been using Creative Cloud since it was released a year ago, and it's actually been a good solution for me. I don't have to pay the boxed retail price for Premiere / After Effects / etc, and everything stays up to date. I'm making enough money with the programs to justify the cost, and I get to deduct the payments on my taxes!

I can definitely see why some people are upset, but I'd suggest at least trying it out before getting all up in arms about it.

May 6, 2013

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Couldn't you deduct the purchased software price as well? In the long run, did your accountant say you'd get a better deduction by paying monthly or a one time lump?

May 6, 2013

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mitch

mitch,
In CA, I would depreciate my software over a few years, and then I'd have a residual amount I could no longer write off. I could sell it on Ebay, or whatever, if I wanted. With Creative Cloud, I believe you can write off 100% of it, which is something all creatives should ask their accountants about.

Kevin

May 10, 2013

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This seems to me like an end to innovation - once people are locked into Adobe's ecosystem for $50 a month, there won't be much need to add features.

May 6, 2013

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Steven Huber

Although this could happen, given Adobe's track record, I think it's unlikely. Among other things, I see it as a way of trying to better compensate those big brains responsible for all the innovation for which Adobe is already known and respected. This change does mean we all have some thinking to do about how serious and/or productive we are about serious software/productivity tools.

May 6, 2013

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Brian

I agree, Brian. From where I sit, things look like they're ramping up, if anything. I hope to continue to be a part of it.

Kevin

May 10, 2013

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It's not like a Cell phone contract. If you don't pay, you just can't use the software. They're not locking you into a prison.

May 7, 2013

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Like everything else, it will be a perfect fit for some and a headache for others, especially those that dabble and don't get a substantial financial return on the CS investment. Every graphic artist I know has it (because it's almost unfathomable that you wouldn't) but all have day jobs and don't rely on it for income or even expect it to pay for itself.

This link might help clear some things up:

http://terrywhite.com/5-myths-about-adobe-creative-cloud/

May 6, 2013

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Brian

A real issue with the Cloud or "Software as a Service" paradigm, is a shifting of the computing power back into the hands of a centralized mainframe.

Quite a few years ago now, we had dummy terminals hooked up to mainframes that did all of the processing. These "thin clients" were the norm, because that's all we had. It was a by-product of logistical necessity. Computing power was precious, and there just wasn't a distributed way of accessing it.

At many research institutes, demand for computing power would outstrip supply so much so that you would have to schedule your computer use. This is still the case today with supercomputers at high-end research institutions.

Then came the personalized desktop computer, heralding a democratization of the technology and all of its attendant power to create whatever the imagination could conjure.

The power to create, whatever you wanted, was in your hands & on your desk. Your data was yours. It was physically and literally in your possession. Floppy disks of varying sizes, CDs, DVDs, hard drives were all physically yours to possess.

We are increasingly moving backwards, towards a system of remote storage, remote access and eventually, as indicated in the Keynote today remote processing. We can see this exampled not as theory but as practice with Google Drive Apps like their spreadsheets and other file types running on Chromebook laptops. We are allowed to back our data up, but the truth is, many of us are happy to create a file on Google Apps and never get around to backing it up. We will only increase our usage of the connected web in this manner, and as a result, we will increase our dependency on remote solutions.

What does this mean? It means the license to create is no longer perpetual, but reliant on the prevailing market condition of the day. Price and access varies with supply and demand. Once Adobe penetrates the market with an aggressive pricing strategy, bringing everyone who once pirated into their legitimate usage fold, they will have a virtual monopoly on creation software. Our vesting will only deepen, and our loyalty will be enforced through deeper integration with our workflows and pipelines. What they do with this monopoly is not in our hands.

There will be a day when our cameras' output, our keyboards output, and our thought output may no longer be accessed by us when we want to, because we can no longer afford the price of continuous access.

May 6, 2013

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Jacques Broquard

"What does this mean? It means the license to create is no longer perpetual, but reliant on the prevailing market condition of the day. Price and access varies with supply and demand. Once Adobe penetrates the market with an aggressive pricing strategy, bringing everyone who once pirated into their legitimate usage fold, they will have a virtual monopoly on creation software. Our vesting will only deepen, and our loyalty will be enforced through deeper integration with our workflows and pipelines. What they do with this monopoly is not in our hands.

There will be a day when our cameras’ output, our keyboards output, and our thought output may no longer be accessed by us when we want to, because we can no longer afford the price of continuous access."

mate, don't fuck the religion of technology (prof. David Noble has a great book on it) with such harsh realistic libertarian truth! ;)

also, those thinking it's weird to want to have your creative production machines away from the internet, like to NOT have the machines accessing the internet may be good to avoid content piracy... first "elite troop" movie from Jose Padilha had pirate copies all over brazil before it was showing in theaters because of this... in the second "elite troop" movie they decided to shut down the internet in the content making bay! :)

May 6, 2013

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guto novo

Here is why I don't like this. In fact I hate it. Here's why...

Firstly, the way it was you could decide if new features were worth your money or not. For my needs I found that I was more than happy to upgrade only every other version. If I were to break it down and look at it as a monthly cost this would come out to about $16 a month for Production Premium. Now they want me to pay $40 or $50 a month for a subscription to every single piece of software they make, at least 60% of which I will NEVER use... I don't give a flying F*%K about In Design, or Dream Weaver, and most of the others I only use once in a blue moon. The only ones I use regularly are After Effects Premiere and Photoshop...

Also the idea that if I stop paying them I can't open my old projects with an older version of the software makes me intensely angry...

This is what happens when a corporation gets a monopoly. They get greedy and screw the little guy...

May 6, 2013

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Angus

I second this.

Every professional user of Adobe software I know operates this way... they weigh if the update is worth the price to them or not... eventually the upgrade would become appealing enough for a purchase. I regularly skipped one and then bought one, because that's what I honestly think they had earned... the marginal updates weren't worth it to me.

Is there a petition somewhere I can sign? Not that it'd matter right?

Will it work for Adobe? Yep.

This business model cannot be just about piracy... if Windows can have an authenticator built into their os, Adobe can do the same with their suites. Though added piracy deterrent is a bonus for any software company.

It IS about monthly income, because it's easier to do everything in a business with regular monthly income.

Not offering the two options is a bit of a sucker-punch, it's greedy, and it's not in the best interest of their customers. At a minimum they could charge a premium for a non-CC version. If it's worth it to me, and it is, let me buy it.

BUT I will end up switching... when I am compelled by new and improved features in a future 'upgrade'.
Freakin' Adobe.

Cheers!

May 6, 2013

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MJ

That's messed up.

May 6, 2013

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moebius22

Yeah I agree. I work freelance so one month I might be working flat out - the next month doing not very much. I think if I did a "cost-benefit" analysis of how much it will cost me to go on "the cloud" then I will end up paying more than if I bought upgrades every year or two and the prices don't inflate too much, and that's only if I think the upgrade is worth the money. With this system you cannot decide if a new feature is actually going to be used but you pay for it anyway! So if this was about what the customers want, then they would be given the choice which route they want to take, depending on the kind of work they do, simple. Some people work flat out and for them it might be good, but for the rest? Different people have different needs. One size does not fit all. But hey, democracy is a terrible idea, dictatorship is much easier, especially when people consent to it.

May 7, 2013

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Ronny

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