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May 8, 2013

Premiere Pro Tutorial: Using 'Leave Color' & 'Change to Color' to Create Highly Stylized Looks in Your NLE

Sin CityWe've been talking quite a bit about Adobe over the past few months, as they've announced new versions of all their major desktop applications and ended the Creative Suite as we know it. Even though some folks are none too thrilled with Adobe right now due to the complete switch to the Creative Cloud, they still make what many consider to be the rising star of NLEs with Premiere Pro, and it's more packed than ever with features to make filmmaker's lives easier. Today we're going to explore two of the lesser known color effects that come with Premiere Pro, the Leave Color and Change to Color effects. While these might not be something you will use day-to-day, they're an excellent option when you need to create some highly stylized shots at a moment's notice. So without any further ado, here are the tutorials, straight from Creative COW:

The most obvious example of how effects like these can be used is Robert Rodriguez's Sin CityHowever, they can also be used in much more subtle and sophisticated ways. For example, by layering your video tracks and putting different instances of the leave color effect (alongside another color effect such as the Three Way Color Corrector or RGB Curves) on each track, you can push various chrominance values in the image to their extremes while leaving others under-saturated. By using the Change to Color effect alongside a method such as this one, you can completely warp your color palette into something entirely different from what you shot (although your DP may never speak with you again).

Of course, if you work with moving or handheld footage frequently, After Effects or DaVinci Resolve will be better solutions for creating these types of effects due to their advanced tracking functionality. However, being able to stay in your NLE and create these effects quickly can be an invaluable tool for the one-man-band types of filmmakers who are on tight deadlines, as well as for bigger productions where the producer or director want to see some temp effects before the picture lock is sent off to the VFX and color departments.

Quite frankly, there are some astounding (and downright bizarre) things that you can do with color inside of Premiere Pro. By better knowing all of the color effects inside of Premiere and how they interact with one another, you can better prepare yourself for anything and everything that a director or client could ever ask of you. If you want more of these fantastic Creative Cow tutorials, hop on over to their Premiere Pro Techniques series and get to it.

What do you guys think? Have you ever used these effects, and to what degree? Do you have any suggestions for how to creatively apply them? Let us know in the comments.

Link: Premiere Pro Techniques (CS6 and Above) with Andrew Devis -- Creative COW

Your Comment

13 Comments

AKA THE SIN CITY EFFECT , definitely a must useful tool for music videos, commercials, and drama isolatign scenes just to name a few.

This can be a powerful tool if needed, but a bit time comsuming and complicated for moving scenes.

Most people do not realize it but there is only one camera capable of doing 3 color isolation in true HD and it is the D52OO. This in camera feature alone is worth the price of the camera and no need for post headache work editing because it is all in camera and resolves really well in stills and video mode.

May 8, 2013

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JayClout

I've played around with this technique with layering to beef up skin tones. Haaaandy dandy.

May 8, 2013

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alex

Now THAT is a good idea. Makeshift secondary correction, nice one!

May 9, 2013

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WillS

I remember seeing that in some resolve tutorials a while back and that what i think the other comments below and above r not understanding, the ability to use this technique to solve other grading / correction problems.

May 9, 2013

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rob calico

Tanks Robert: Ppro has been my favorite for a long long time. I'll be sure to go through the paces with then tuts !

May 8, 2013

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FabDex

the two tutorials are very poor...
Why don't you choose something better to show off Premiere's capabilities?

May 8, 2013

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Such as? If these aren't to your liking, by all means list links to ones you feel are better. Add to the conversation, remember.

For my part, knowing that these relatively advanced colour tools are available without exiting an NLE is pretty worthwhile info, but admittedly I'm no Adobe mastermind. More's the pity.

May 9, 2013

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Where is the 4k footage from the blackmagic production camera? Why is nobody mentioning the lack of demo footage? There should be a thread dedicated to this issue.

May 8, 2013

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Pianohero

While this is useful for beginners, I'd much rather use the updated Three-way Color Corrector in CS6 - it's way more powerful. The secondary keyer is great! I use it for adding cyans to blues, making greens pop, fixing skin tones, etc, without affecting any other part of the image.

http://youtu.be/6lQzVEupOsM?t=57s

May 9, 2013

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Clayton

Agreed, or Colorista if you have it.
One thing about Change Color I've found is that it is HEAVY on render times. I'm currently editing a TED event where two of the 5 cameras were underexposed and the blue lows and mids purple shifted BIG time (turning the classy dark blue curtains to a hideous purple).

Though 'Change Color' was able to do the job superficially at first, but I ended up doing it in Colorist II for the final correction, because it looked much more natural and was noticeably faster on render times (over 8 hours of footage from the 2 cameras had to corrected in this manner, so render time was a big factor for me).

May 10, 2013

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Jules

Agreed, or Colorista if you have it.
One thing about Change Color I've found is that it is HEAVY on render times. I'm currently editing a TED event where two of the 5 cameras were underexposed and the blue lows and mids purple shifted BIG time (turning the classy dark blue curtains to a hideous purple).

Though 'Change Color' was able to do the job superficially at first, I ended up doing it in Colorist II for the final correction, because it looked much more natural and was noticeably faster on render times (over 8 hours of footage from the 2 cameras had to corrected in this manner, so render time was a big factor for me).

May 10, 2013

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Jules

You can do this with one button in KdenLive ( http://www.kdenlive.org ) along with a slew of other things that are pretty hard in premiere.

May 12, 2013

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yin

great videos, big help thank you, i have a question, is there any possible way to use the leave color effect or any other effect to keep 2 or more colors and make the others i don't want black and white??

January 18, 2014

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andreas