August 7, 2013

New Rhino Rig Shoulder Mount Offers Stabilization Through Customization

Lately we've been hearing a lot about gyro-stabilizers, but the team over at Rhino, who brought you the Rhino Slider, have assembled an innovative, modular, and fully customizable shoulder stabilizer: the Rhino Rig. Since the launch of their Kickstarter campaign a week ago, the Rhino Rig has, by far, surpassed its $50,000 goal, in part because each pledge equals a preorder or part of the kit. Not only that, but they're offering you quite a deal. So, hit the jump to check out what the Rhino Rig can do, and how much you can save by pre-ordering on Kickstarter.

One of the most impressive things about the Rhino Rig is its fully customizable design. It's made up of 4 modular components: the Base Kit, the Rail System, the Cage, and the Rhino Rest, all of which can be changed to fit the operator.

The crown jewel of the Rig, in my opinion, is the Rhino Rest.

For ultimate comfort and customization, we created the first ever fully-articulating, custom-fitting shoulder rest; the Rhino Rest, which is being received as the most comfortable shoulder rest on the market. It features 9 individually articulating TPR (thermoplastic rubber) pads that distribute the weight equally across the shoulder and an integrated 15 degree cant that conforms to the slope of your shoulder. We added even more functionality by integrating eight 1/4-20 accessory mounting locations above each link.

Check out the Kickstarter video below to see the Rhino Rig in action:

Another thing that I like about this stabilizer is that you can add to it, because it's completely modular. If you're on a budget and can only afford the base kit to start, no problem. If you do a lot of action videography and only need the cage, no sweat. But, if you want to start branching out and adding to your rig, you can, and each new piece serves a purpose to make your life easier (and more stable) as you shoot.

And speaking of add-ons, the structure of the Rhino Rig allows you to add all sorts of accessories onto it, and since it's fully customizable, you don't have to worry too much about decreased mobility or performance from crowded gear.

The Rhino Rig_02

Cameras

Even though the Cage comes in 3 different heights, any camera that is over 6.4" tall will not fit inside the tallest cage. Here is a partial list of cameras that will work with the Rhino Rig:

Canon - EOS Rebel Series, EOS-1D X, T2i, T3i, T4i, T5i, 60D, 7D, 6D, 5D Mark II, 5D Mark III, Cinema EOS-1D C, EOS C100, EOS C300, EOS C500

Nikon - D3100, D3200, D5100, D90, D5200, D7000, D7100, D300S, D600, D800, D3X, D4

Sony - a58, a65, a77, a99, NEX-3N, NEX-5R, NEX-6, NEX-7, NEX FS700, F5, F55

Panasonic - GH2, GH3, AF100

Red Digital Cinema - Red Scarlet, Red Epic, Red Dragon

Blackmagic Design - Blackmagic Cinema Camera, Pocket Cinema Camera, Production Camera 4K

Since the Rhino Rig is raising money to fund production of the Rhino Rig, they've drawn up a production plan to show you not only when to expect to receive your Rig in the mail, but also what phase of production its in along the way.

The Rhino Rig Production Plan

Just yesterday, Rhino launched some new rewards. There is now a counterweight for an extra $70:

They're also adding a new pledge called the "Rhino Studio Kit," which includes the Rhino Rig Full Kit, the new 2ft Rhino Slider PRO ($450), and Rhino Armor case ($75) for $300 off retail:

Rhino-Studio-Kit

If you're interested in learning more about the Rhino Rig, check out their Kickstarter campaign. You can also find the new 2ft. Rhino Slider PRO and case over on their website if you'd like to order one right now.

What do you think about the Rhino Rig? From what you've seen, how do you think it compares with other similar stabilizers? Let us know in the comments.

Links:

Your Comment

29 Comments

This is just filler. You may as well have just cut n pasted their kickstarter page.

Some where along the way nofilmschool has become an aggregate site with little to say but repeat what others are posting I other sites, site most of your audience already visit on their own.

Bookmark deleted. Sad for what nofilmschool has become, was once one of my favorite sites.

August 7, 2013

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Nat

Maybe you should ask for your money back. Sheesh.

August 7, 2013

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Mike

Ah get over yourself. No one cares.

August 7, 2013

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Peter Kelly

You'll be missed...random guy.

August 7, 2013

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CJ

So long dude, you won't be missed.

August 7, 2013

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Tom

Yes, I totally agree that it's irrelevant to report to indie filmmakers on the developments of stabilization gear, especially when they can get in on the ground floor to snag some hefty discounts. This blog has become the place I go to to find out about late-breaking gear news. So thanks for reporting on kickstarter campaigns and upcoming products.

August 7, 2013

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steve

I put start and end html tags with the word "sarcasm" in them. I guess the page thought it was actually html, then rejected it. Please read the first part as sarcasm.

August 7, 2013

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steve

This place is a gear blog and it always was and always will be

August 7, 2013

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john jeffries

I dont think theres another site that is as well updated as this. The site is great, i dont get on here much but when I do..i drink Dos NFS. Stay thirsty my friends.

August 7, 2013

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Mark K.

Well considering that it is about uplifting and supporting a kickstarter product, not a celebrity , but comon folks and considering that the gear is not readily available ,then it would be impossible for this not to be a filler.

Save your argument for when it may be appropriate , i do not see anything wrong with what V.Renee posted, She is a writer and post writer for the sight, this is not a review from joe or the sights founder, so give her some slack or better yet, just press the back button, its not that serious.

Now as far as the product its self on the other hand, ehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh,

August 7, 2013

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jay clout

I believe I just watched the best camera rig game changer in the history of film making.

August 7, 2013

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can't say I agree

August 7, 2013

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+1000

August 7, 2013

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jay clout

Where'd you see it at? I need to check that out too, 'cause this one seems kind of sucky.

August 7, 2013

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mitch

And who do you work for ?

October 24, 2013

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Dheep'

Am I being a total idiothole and not reading it right or is this one of the worse rewards system ever

Give them $1650 and you can save $300ish dollars off of the price!!! ... jog on.

August 7, 2013

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Chris Lambert

Those Kickstarter rewards are a discount for being an early buyer. If you weren't buying it through Kickstarter - you'd be adding $300 to the price for that reward. The rig is not yet available to buy in the store, but when it is, if will be more expensive than it is here.

August 7, 2013

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Joe Marine
Editor-at-Large
Shooter/Writer/Director

Finally, a modular rig....(the amount of sarcasm in typing this is literally painful)

August 7, 2013

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Pat

The shoulder grip is kind of cool.

August 7, 2013

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DLD

I wish a break down of what the product is actually costing to make was shown. The prices of these things make my wallet hide in the house.

August 7, 2013

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Jer

I can't buy any rig before testing it in store, too many disappointments.

August 7, 2013

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Marcus

these prices are the reason why china and korea are dominating the market

August 7, 2013

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Mark K.

Or some guy in his garage selling DIY-ish rigs.

August 8, 2013

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Bry

Rig looks very nice, but not much fun trying to operate a RED without being counter weighted or at the least sitting up on the shoulder. Really is a less than ideal way to operate as shown above in my experience.

August 8, 2013

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Totally agree. I'm still at a loss as to why we're still seeing shoulder rigs that place the sensor in front of the camera operator? Now I do understand that buying an EVF is cost prohibitive for a lot of folks, but it just makes good sense from an operational standpoint. The closer the sensor to the center of the operator, the more you decrease the occurrence of rolling shutter(mainly in DSLRs), especially when doing whip-pans. Placing the sensor closer to the center also takes more weight off the arms and places it onto the shoulder, decreasing the fatigue factor. I'm one of those DIY kind of guys, who basically took a cheap, but sturdy(all metal) rig and was able to emulate Letus's Master Cinema Series shoulder rig...right down to the counter weight. My DSLR has the look and feel of a quality cinema camera, in terms of its handling and movement on screen.

August 15, 2013

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Gerrick

I was about to pledge until I saw the delivery date of Jan 2014? By then they could be other manufacturer producing better or about the same rig that ready IN STOCK. Don't you think so?

August 8, 2013

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August 8, 2013

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yin

Totally agree. I'm still at a loss as to why we're still seeing shoulder rigs that place the sensor in front of the camera operator? Now I do understand that buying an EVF is cost prohibitive for a lot of folks, but it just makes good sense from an operational standpoint. The closer the sensor to the center of the operator, the more you decrease the occurrence of rolling shutter(mainly in DSLRs), especially when doing whip-pans. Placing the sensor closer to the center also takes more weight off the arms and places it onto the shoulder, decreasing the fatigue factor. I'm one of those DIY kind of guys, who basically took a cheap, but sturdy(all metal) rig and was able to emulate Letus's Master Cinema Series shoulder rig...right down to the counter weight. My DSLR has the look and feel of a quality cinema camera, in terms of its handling and movement on screen.

August 15, 2013

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Gerrick

Oops! Sorry about the duplicate post!

August 15, 2013

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Gerrick