June 6, 2017

Samyang Unveils Full Frame 35mm Lens to 'Resemble the Human Eye'

Samyang
Samyang has added to its autofocus line with a new 35mm F2.8 lens. 

Samyang has introduced its third AF lens, the 35mm F2.8 FE, an extremely compact and lightweight lens to accompany its existing 14mm F2.8 FE and 50mm F1.4 FE lineup. The newest "tiny but mighty" lens is designed to cover full frame Sony E-mount mirrorless cameras–Sony A7S II and ASR II–with a very affordable price tag of $300, when compared to Sony's own 35mm F2.8 (coming in at around $800).

The AF 35mm F2.8 FE weighs just 85g and measures 3.3cm in length. Inside are seven elements in six groups, including two aspherical lenses and one refractive lens, plus Samyang's Ultra Multi Coating to combat aberration and unwanted light dispersion.

The lens promises to deliver "fast and accurate" AF performance and high-quality images "from center to corners." The focal length on full frame sensors will most resemble the human eye, according to Samyang. On Sony alpha 6000 and 5000 series cameras, the lens will be equivalent to a 52mm. 

Samyang 35mm F2.8
Samyang 35mm F2.8

What Samyang is pushing here is portability and price. While the 35mm lens isn't weather-sealed, its minimum focus distance of 0.35m can achieve that wide look with little camera shake while still being able to focus on the subject during tracking shots. 

The lens is expected to ship July 2017. You can find more about it on Samyang's website.

Tech Specs:

  • 35mm F2.8
  • AF System 
  • Aspherical Lens 
  • Ultra Multi Coating 
  • Circular aperture with 7 blades 

Your Comment

8 Comments

Any IS?

June 6, 2017 at 5:18PM

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J Robbins
324

With that size I really doubt it.

June 6, 2017 at 6:53PM

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Kelvin Nhantumbo
Director, Screenwriter
1

Kelvin is correct. No image stabilization in the lens.

Hope that helps.

June 6, 2017 at 10:47PM

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Daron James
Writer

What absolute rubbish.

A 35mm lens on a full frame sensor will give you a field of view of approximately 37degrees x 25 degrees. The human field of view is widely accepted to be (it varies person to person) 124 degrees x 55 degrees. Even though this FOV is for both eyes in tandem, the second eye gives width, not extra height and at 55 degrees vertical, you can see that the eye has more than double the FOV of this lens.

It is also widely accepted that perspective does not change with focal length, but with distance to subject.

Samyang have no idea what they're talking about.

June 6, 2017 at 7:36PM

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Richard Lewis
3D Visualisation Specialist
164

You bring up an interesting topic. I believe you're dropping knowledge from page 9 here: https://nzila.co.nz/media/uploads/2017_01/vissim_bpg102_lowfinal.pdf

On page 4, one of the bullet points says, " While this guideline does not advocate a particular focal length lens or camera format for use in all situations, a 50mm focal length lens (or its digital equivalent) continues to be widely used in the preparation of visual simulations."

One of my favorite reads on what mm lens best illustrates the field of view of a human eye can be found here:
https://wordpress.lensrentals.com/blog/2009/03/the-camera-vs-the-eye

I've also read people say 24mm, 30mm, 35mm, 50mm... I think that comes from the variation you mentioned. I believe when Samyang says, "For full frame sensors, the focal length resembles the human eye the most" that's their interpretation of the subject.

Is there something you can point to that makes it definitive, an industry standard that should be followed? Would enjoy reading your thoughts.

June 6, 2017 at 11:51PM

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Daron James
Writer

Ha - I was involved in the research from which that NZILA document was produced. Some of it is very poorly worded, but the technical aspects of this guide are mostly correct.

If you take a panoramic image around the nodal point of a lens and stitch those images together accurately, you will get the same result with a 24mm lens as you will with a 50mm. The image produced with a 24mm lens will only require 3 individual photos to get the 124x55 degree fov. The 50mm lens will require 10 individual photos. If you use the same sensor, the final resolution, will therefore be much greater in the 50mm image, but once scaled, the relative position and scale of all objects within the shot will be the same.

If you're interested, this book is a good reference;
https://www.amazon.com/Windfarm-Visualisation-Perspective-Alan-MacDonald...

Correction on my original post - FOV of a 35mm lens on full frame is actually 55 x 38 degrees. Accidentally had my app set to Nikon DX and not full frame. My point is still correct. This is no where near the FOV of human vision.

June 7, 2017 at 5:00AM

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Richard Lewis
3D Visualisation Specialist
164

I'll definitely check the book out thanks. Ya, 35mm 57.4 x 37.8 degrees on FF.

Definitely not disagreeing that a 35mm doesn't cover the FOV of human vision when you look at the numbers.

These guys have FOV for both eyes at 200 degrees wide x 135 degrees tall. Page 398.
https://books.google.com/books?id=GHoEWq6tcSgC&pg=PA398#v=onepage&q&f=false

I was looking for a technical report on visual perception NASA did in 1964 but couldn't find it online. It's a great read too.
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?print=yes&R=19640015224

From the article mentioned above:
"Studies have measured the cone of visual attention and found it to be about 55 degrees wide. On a 35mm full frame camera, a 43mm lens provides an angle of view of 55 degrees, so that focal length provides exactly the same angle of view that we humans have. Damn if that isn’t halfway between 35mm and 50mm. So the original argument is ended, the actual ‘normal’ lens on a 35mm SLR is neither 35mm nor 50mm, it’s halfway in between."

So this study has a 43mm on a 35mm camera providing the exact same angle humans.

In your research, did you find a focal length that best illustrates the angle of view for human eyes?

June 7, 2017 at 2:05PM

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Daron James
Writer

just a question: what's the corner sharpness of a human eye? we are comparing apples and bananas...

June 10, 2017 at 10:46AM

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stefan flos
director of videography
1