October 5, 2017

Sound Devices Increases Track Size on Popular MixPre Series

Sound Devices
A multichannel recorder, mixer and USB interface, the new MixPre-10T from Sound Devices adds versatility to your audio workflow. 

Sound Devices has stepped out from the lab again to announce a fresh addition to its MixPre series, the MixPre-10T.  Introduced earlier this year, the MixPre-3 and MixPre-6 marked the addition of aggressively priced sound gear for the masses to their line of high-end professional products. The MixPre-10T aims to build from that successful lineup. 

Its built-in "ultra-high accuracy" timecode generator holds timecode for hours even when turned off.

We reached out to the company's co-founder Jon Tatooles to see if the MixPre-10T was originally intended to be unveiled at the same time as its predecessors. "It was planned from the start," he revealed, "but development priority was the MixPre-3 and MixPre-6. This version needed more time in the oven to find the right balance of size and usability." 

Sound Devices MixPre-10T
Sound Devices MixPre-10TCredit: Sound Devices

The entire MixPre series stems from the early development of the MixPre-D, which was introduced during the DSLR boom. The MixPre-10T combines 12 track recording, mixing and a USB interface—all controlled by a responsive capacitive touchscreen—and it's the first in the series to generate timecode. Its built-in, "ultra-high accuracy" timecode generator/reader holds timecode for hours even when turned off or if power is removed. Supporting common timecode modes and frame rates, the MixPre-10T can lock to or output world clock for syncing in a digital environment. Handy BNC, Aux and HDMI timecode connections are accessible on either the right or left side panel. With this very much appreciated spec bump, there's also a bump in price to $1,799, which is expected because accurate timecode isn't cheap. 

Driving the MixPre-10T are eight Kashmir microphone preamps designed specifically for the MixPre series by Sound Devices. They feature a -130dBV noise floor, analog limiters, and a 32-bit A-to-D converters for exceptional audio quality that put the less expensive Zoom F8 Field Recorder and Tascam DR-701D 6-Track Field Recorder to shame. 

Sound Devices MixPre-10T
Sound Devices MixPre-10T Left SideCredit: Sound Devices

There are 10 total inputs: eight full-sized XLR/TRS combo jacks for mic or line level and a 3.5mm auxiliary/microphone input that can be used for 2-channel line input, camera return or timecode. Additionally, two TA3 mini XLR balanced outputs and a 3.5mm stereo output offer further routing flexibility. Each output is assignable in the menu routing matrix. 

The MixPre-10T can record sample rates up to 192 kHz 16/24 bit to WAV (Broadcast Wave File) with embedded timecode and metadata on SD, SDXC or SDHC cards. There's a max storage of 512 GB on SDXC. An "Auto-Background Copying" feature records files up to 192kHz / 24-bit to an SD card while automatically copying to a USB thumbdrive (USB A) as a backup. As a USB audio interface, you can input 12 channels and output 4 channels at 44.1 to 96 kHz 16/24 bit from a computer. 

Sound Devices MixPre-10T
Sound Devices MixPre-10T Right SideCredit: Sound Devices

An LED can shuffle between three different views for multitrack, mix and USB metering with the limiter activity providing a window into your mix using the eight gain control knobs. For mic level inputs, gain ranges from +6dB to +76dB while line level is -20dB to +30dB. By pressing the gain knob you gain access to panning or soloing. If you're wondering, it does include a 3.5mm headphone jack that can be further customized with routing presets. 

The intuitive menu offers three modes of operation: basic, advanced and custom. Basic takes the guesswork out for right out the box recording while advanced and custom modes give access to multi-channel recording, metering, routing, timecode, mic pre gain, stereo and M/S channel linking, input/output delay, headphone presets and more.

Sound Devices MixPre-10T
Sound Devices MixPre-10TCredit: Sound Devices

To power the unit, a locking 4-pin Hirose connector provides options for an external battery like a NP-1 cup and IDX NP-L7S battery or AC power adapter. Sound Devices also offers two optional power sleds with eight AA batteries or two hot-swappable Sony L-Mount Li-on batteries. The sleds can be used on any of MixPre models, and of the two, we'd suggest using the Sony L-Mount version. 

Built from a lightweight die-cast aluminum chassis, the small form factor (1.375”H x 8.125”W x 6.875"D) is quite robust and will hold up over competing models made from plastic. The free Sound Devices Wingman app on iOS and Android devices even allows you to control the device via BlueTooth.  When we asked Tatooles if we'll see higher tracks in this product line in the future, he mentions, "We obviously see higher track counts as important and that's why we have the 644, 688 and 970."

Sound Devices says the MixPre-10T will be available by the end of October. 

Tech Specs

  • 12 track recording / 10 inputs 
  • Kashmir pre-amps with -130dbv noise floor
  • 192 kHz max sample rate
  • 24 / 16 bit depth
  • USB Interface
  • Routing matrix
  • Basic, advanced, custom record modes
  • Timecode generator/reader 
  • Multiple power solutions 
  • Compatible with Wingman app

Your Comment

3 Comments

This is the kind of amateur-hour junk that makes this site more worthless daily.

First of all, WTF is "track size" on a digital recorder? There are no physical tracks, duh. Search the article for this term and IT DOESN'T EVEN APPEAR.

Then there's this obvious shilling: "They feature a -130dBV noise floor, analog limiters, and a 32-bit A-to-D converters for exceptional audio quality that put the less expensive Zoom F8 Field Recorder and Tascam DR-701D 6-Track Field Recorder to shame."

Oh really? Based on what tests that you've performed, and failed utterly to provide the results of?

Save everyone some time and just post a link to SD's marketing materials, and take this steaming pile down.

October 8, 2017 at 12:48AM, Edited October 8, 12:57AM

2
Reply
David Gurney
DP
1470

I for one welcome our advertisement overlords.

Also, I don't like to jump to another website to read a long and hyperbolic ad. I like these summarised ads way more. No need to surf to another website and it's shorter to read to boot.

October 9, 2017 at 9:06AM, Edited October 9, 9:06AM

1
Reply
avatar
Auke-Jan Weening
Filmmaker
94

Ha ha, indeed!

October 9, 2017 at 8:26PM

0
Reply
David Gurney
DP
1470