September 14, 2014 at 9:39AM

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How to Create Thousands of Fans for your Film Before You Shoot a Single Minute

(Note: This is all hypothetical. Since I've done so very successfully, using this technique for creating book fans, I'm only assuming that it can be applied toward film and I don't see why it wouldn't.)

How to find your film audience. The Internet has made it easy to find your potential audience. The techniques listed below will cost zero dollars and zero cents, only your man-power. If you'd rather not do it yourself, ideally you can hire someone or train an intern to do so.

Step 1- Identify your audience - First, you need to know who would be interested in seeing your film. The easiest way to do this is to think of 3 films that are similar to yours. Saying there is "no other film like mine" won't cut it this time.
Out of the hundreds of thousands of films ever created, there is bound to be a film or films similar in tone to yours.

Step 2 - Calculate how many fans you will need in order to make a profit on your film, if that is your goal or to create enough buzz to take your career to the next step. Only you know this. But if you haven't read the famous 1000 True Fans article, that's a great place to start: http://kk.org/thetechnium/2008/03/1000-true-fans/

Step 3 - Next you need to find fans of that film. Where do they hang out online? You're going to need excel or Google Docs for this or a simple piece of paper and pen, if you'd rather do this by hand. Here are a few ideas:

Twitter - Twitter is one of the best ways to find people who are already talking about that film. You simply type the name of the film in the search box and make a list of their first & last name and Twitter handles.

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/about/graphsearch is an awesome way to find out who likes certain films and even limit that search to a certain age bracket or only males or females or only people who like a combination of films or those within a certain geographic location. And it's all free.

Blogs - You can go to www.google.com/blogsearch and search for people who have blogged about this film. They are certainly passionate enough about the film to blog about it, so that's a great start. You're looking for not only bloggers but those who have commented about this film. Look for those who absolutely loved it, not those who hated it, those are not your audience. Make a list including their first and last names, any links that might lead to their blogs, Twitter, Facebook or even email.

Indiegogo and Kickstarter - Look for films similar to yours that have been funded and look under the supporters of those films. You can create an iMacro to extract this information or just do it manually. Although their contact information is not available, you can easily cross reference these people's photos, names, ages and locations and find them using https://www.facebook.com/about/graphsearch (it's free) or manually with Twitter. Make a list of these people. They not only like films but are willing to invest their hard earned money in films they're passionate about.

Between these 5 different areas alone, you will easily rack up thousands of names and contact information.

But once you've found them, how do you convert them into fans who are will go give you their time or dare I say, hard earned money? And how do you approach them without scaring them off screaming "spam"? In my next post, I'll be discussing what I learned (the hard way) about what works and wasn't doesn't.

15 Comments

Sounds good Jeff - looking forward to the next post.

September 15, 2014 at 2:46PM

5
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Nice, looking forward to part 2

September 15, 2014 at 5:24PM

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Jason Bowdach
Colorist
98

Thanks, J Cameron & Jason. I don't know if there's a way to message you using NoFilmSchool but I'll post a link here to it as well, once it's up.

September 15, 2014 at 6:15PM, Edited September 15, 6:15PM

5
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Jeff Rivera
Filmmaker | Storyteller
858

watch my short film and please give me your feedbacks

https://youtu.be/3icSuUrUbzg

December 5, 2016 at 3:11AM

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September 15, 2014 at 6:56PM

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Jeff Rivera
Filmmaker | Storyteller
858

I'm digging this, Jeff. Sally forth.

September 15, 2014 at 8:04PM

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Benjamin Dewhurst
Writer
writer/director

Really good topic to think about / write about... :) I think that this is exactly what most of us without or with small budget need. Excellent!

September 17, 2014 at 4:25PM

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Bojan Andrejek
DP / Cinematographer / Producer
236

So far so good. This is very interesting for me as I am trying to grow my fan base for my current film. Thanks for sharing.

September 18, 2014 at 5:44PM

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Jonesy Jones
Storymaker
575

It's interesting but onces you have the audience, must to maintain... not alway sit's easy if you wants keep shooting other movies, you cant maintain the audience...

September 26, 2014 at 3:46AM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7174

https://youtu.be/3icSuUrUbzg

watch this short film and please leave your feedbacks

December 5, 2016 at 3:19AM

4
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I have really learned a lot by both of your sharing(Part 1 & 2)---thank you very much Mr Jeff Rivers !!!

September 28, 2014 at 10:54PM

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Normen Arule
Scriptwriter/Storyteller/Director
72

I'm gonna give this I try! I really think this could work.

September 29, 2014 at 4:19PM

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Jesús J. Borges
Storyteller
154

interesting read!

October 2, 2014 at 10:12AM

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Luis Garcia
Director/Editor
354

Really great guide! I'm going to have to try this out for my next project. Thanks so much!

January 4, 2015 at 2:13PM

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Austin Briggs
Director
106

https://youtu.be/3icSuUrUbzg

watch my short fikm and leave your feedbacks.....if you like it please help me in promoting it on social media

December 5, 2016 at 3:18AM

1
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