February 3, 2015 at 7:38PM

3

Easiest way to make "burn-in" subtitles?

So I've done some searching on the internet but couldn't come up with a ideal answer yet so i figured i'd try here. I work in a range of editing programs, mostly in Premiere and am looking for a way to create subtitles easily.

Some problems that i've encountered over the years of doing them....

Final cut 7- If i decided later that i wanted to change style/size i would have to go through on each one and make the change. No support for copying and pasting text attributes.

Premiere- Not a fan of their title tool at all.

After Effects- Easier to work with for subtitles but it's harder to edit & trim. Also just as hard as FCP7 to make any font style/size changes.

Is there any 3rd party programs that make this easier. I came across "InqScribe" and like the idea of it however it lacks supports for exporting XML to premiere.

Thanks in advance,
Tim

11 Comments

I use externals programs, some times is the easy/best way.

February 6, 2015 at 2:36PM

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Rag├╝el Cremades
Film producer and director
7528

In the past I've used Aegisub http://www.aegisub.org/ and the After Effects script Pt_importsubtitles http://aescripts.com/pt_importsubtitles/ it worked well.

February 8, 2015 at 1:26PM

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Avid Media Composer. Once you choose your subs settings, by using "Save as", each time you type new ones there's no need to do the same thing over again. Cheers.

February 8, 2015 at 1:28PM

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Dulcinea_
Broadcast journalist and video editor
96

Some DVD authoring tools do that, and virtualdub with some plugins too with avi files.
there is apps like DivXLand Media Subtitler too. But I havent used them recently.

February 8, 2015 at 1:31PM

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Honestly, my favorite way of adding subtitles is a little funny, but works perfectly.

01: Export Low-res version to YouTube and use their subtitle editor
02: Edit and correct subtitles that were automatically generated
03: Download SRT subtitle file from YouTube

These next steps I perform on every video, regardless of subtitles or none:
01: Export LOSSLESS file from Adobe Premiere
02: Import LOSSLESS file into HandBrake (In my opinion, the VERY BEST H.264 conversion tool available, despite the fact it's free)
03: Import downloaded SRT into HandBrake and select either soft or hard subtitles
04: Begin Conversion for whatever format you need.

I always export LOSSLESS

(Quicktime Format | Uncompressed YUV 10 bit 4:2:2 | Maximum Depth | Maximum Render Quality)

and keep it as a master copy. Please note that the filesize is HUGE, and that render time, regardless of your hardware, may be very long indeed. However - There is no denying in my opinion that Handbrake does the very best job at encoding video to the H.264 codec.

You don't HAVE to use a lossless codec, DNxHD or ProRes work just fine too - and I may change to using these codecs instead of lossless.

Enjoy!

February 8, 2015 at 1:51PM

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Brandon Neubert
Color Artist / Writer / Director
674

I just encountered the same issue, and found this:
http://vimeo.com/80445034
It works great for burned-in text, but you will of course not get separate .srt-files.

February 8, 2015 at 2:02PM

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Caspar Kerr
Enthusiast
116

It might not be free, but I find that MacCaption is very good for burned in subtitles.

February 8, 2015 at 5:03PM

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Eric Metzloff
Producer
93

I've been using X-files from spherico.com. $30. Can copy and paste the text to a text editor, add some approx. TC numbers. A bit of simple formatting and import to FCP7 or X as xml and adjust timings and anything else.

February 8, 2015 at 7:49PM

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H Silver
Director, Producer, Videographer, Editor, Colorist
23

If you're running mac, try Submerge. It works great.

February 9, 2015 at 8:27AM

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Thanks to all those that got back to me. I look forward to trying some of these out. After seeing such a wide range of answers it amazes me that none of the editing programs have improved on this over the years. And it also boggles my mind that spell check is still a missing feature

February 10, 2015 at 6:07PM, Edited February 10, 6:07PM

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Tim McDermott
Video Editor / Digital Content Creator
108

After trying many different programs and techniques from all over the web... I could only get this to work:
https://fxfactory.com/info/subtitles/
And it works wonderfully (with some minor glitches that you can get around). Downside: it cost $99 - but worth it (especially when the client pays)!

October 28, 2015 at 7:28PM

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Spencer T. Folmar
Director, Producer, Writer
131

By far the easiest way to create captions/subtitles is with MovieCaptioner. http://www.synchrimedia.com

June 4, 2016 at 2:10PM

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