January 15, 2015 at 10:38AM

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FIRST Freelance Job/Pay/corporate??!?!

I finally stop giving myself excuses and starting filming and pursuing my passion last year. I filmed one short film (terrible) in 2013 and worked on around 14 projects last year. This year i hope to double that and I also hope to start working some freelance.

I luckily got my first freelance gig with a major insurance company. A got hired through someone working for them but none the less it's a very big company and a great opportunity.

When i first met up with her I did some research and I found that $250 for a day is decent for a up and coming videographer, I don't know if this is accurate. I told her that number because she was a friend of a friend (and because it was my first job). Her exact response was "OH, that's a lot less then i thought, I am going to give you way more." This was in November...

The event is January15th (tomorrow and she finally scheduled everything to be shot January 5th (two weeks to edit, which i thought was plenty)... But she turned out to be very hands on and wrote me "notes" on what to edit, sent them to me YESTERDAY and even called me last night to walk me through what to cut out and what to leave in. Besides learning that working with clients can be very stressful and annoying I learned that my next project I will have to lay down some ground rules.

With all that being said, she really is a nice person and right now the pricing is left in the air. She just asked me what would be reasonable. I called off of work one day for her ( my soul crushing 9-5), she was willing pay me to take off of work today but I instead just came in late. She is paying me $500 to take pictures at the event where the the video will be shown, but I have no idea what to charge her for the video. I took a day off of work for it, I worked on it everyday after work for the last two weeks and during this past weekend. She knows it was very rushed and is letting me name my price.

Can anyone help me out?

36 Comments

Forgot to mention, the day OF the shoot she informed me she wanted me to shoot a short little sketch that will also be shown during the event. So there are TWO videos I did for her.

January 15, 2015 at 2:48PM

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Franklin Carpio
Filmmaker/Director/Editor
360

$250 for a day of video shooting is very low pay North America, even if you're starting out.

Unless you are doing this as a personal favor for a friend, I would charge at least double this price to shoot, and more if you are also doing the editing and are expected to deliver the finished video.

January 15, 2015 at 2:57PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30394

The day of the shoot I filmed from 7:30-6:00pm and I've been editing both videos. Sending them to her tonight. This is where I am lost. I read some places that 20 an hour is good to start, I read other places that you shouldn't charge by the hour. She is already paying me $500 to shoot photos at the event, so naturally I would think I could charge more for the videos, but I don't want to low ball myself I also don't want to take advantage of her, since I think she will hire me again.

Franklin Carpio

January 15, 2015 at 6:01PM

I agree it is always hard to value yourself when you're just starting out. A lot of people recommend a daily rate, working at your expenses and going from their....but its hard to estimate this correctly, and I'm not sure how many people can stick to their original estimate of "time allotted to job".

Working for a large company in their video department doing their day to day video work and occasionally outsourcing to a boutique company for larger or specialised jobs the amounts that they charge for what could be 4 days (albeit very intense) work can often be (far) north of 4 figures per job.

At the end of the day you're going to have to have the hard conversation, work out how many days you've spent on the project and how much you'd like to be paid for the job, it appears this client has potential to offer more work so it may not be a relationship you wish to tarnish so early on.

Another thing I've learnt doing my own freelance work is that the Client often doesn't know what they want until it's front of them, but they sure do know what they don't want, and it's often your first or third draft. They can give you buzz words like "pop" and "more dynamic" but there is a point at which you have to stop providing iterations and just listen to what they're asking for even if it does sound silly.
Early on I was following client advice very closely replicating exactly what they expressed in either email or we'd spoken about, when they see it put into fruition they realise how silly it is.
It is sometimes your job to lead them to a product that looks really good, incorporates some of their ideas and visions and doesn't kill you to create it!

....So good luck with that, its a fun industry.

January 15, 2015 at 11:26PM

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Dale Leszczynski
Shooter Editor VFX
264

$250 as a day rate for a newbie if you were JUST shooting, maybe.. Pricing is hard, you're gonna lose money and some and make a "killing" on some. Like Dale said, clients often don't know what they want. I recommend giving 1 revision included, then charging extra for more. This job is too late, just make them happy. But for the future.

Here is a very brief rundown on how I figure what to charge. My "average" job, I have about 1 hour of prep/pre-production (this is coordinating, emailing, etc..) and 3-5 hours of editing/delivery for every hour of shoot time, plus a couple non-billable hours)

Again that is average; type of video, level of production, etc.. play major parts.
If you want to make $12/hr take home as if you were working for a company (which is low) you need to charge 15hr (extra taxes), so lets say 6 hours for every hour shooting. That's about $85/hr to pay yourself (properly), plus you need charge a little extra to cover gear/expenses.
Full day rate a typically discounted a bit.
So maybe $500-$600 is fair?

Hopefully that helps some, at least to give you a starting point to figure out logistics for yourself. You have to know how much it costs you to run to figure this stuff out and you have to know how long it takes you to do certain things. Since your shooting for yourself and new its harder.

January 16, 2015 at 2:05PM

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Josh Wilkinson
Music Video Director/DP
133

I have worked in various in-house video departments over my career. Each one does this differently. One of the most successful models I have seen is basing your pricing on a project by project basis. They charge a flat fee for each video that is to be produced. In the contract, this includes, how many people will be interviewed, the length of the video, editing and 1 round of revisions, how the video will be delivered, etc. If they would like any changes to your initial contract, then additional fees are added.

This helps in the event things start to go wrong, and it is much easier in dealing with client relations when you go over on hours and the client would like to argue with you about the final price. In addition, it helps keep everything standard and makes it easier for you to figure out how long you need to spend on a project and helps balance out your work and personal lives.

I know that you are just starting out and it is a bit drowning to try to figure out what you feel your pricing should be but I feel that by basing your pricing on project basis can help with the beginning stages. Like Josh stated above, figure out how much you would like to base your take home profit to be and then add a bit to cover any additional expenses, like taxes and such. That should be how much you charge per video. If you end up taking less time than needed, then extra profit in your pocket.

Hope this helps.

January 16, 2015 at 5:35PM

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Robert Dixon
Videographer/Editor
74

Hey Franklin, first thing you gotta do is make sure to always work out the cost and payment schedule before you agree to do any work. You wouldn't work your 9-5 without knowing your hourly and when payday is, right? Same thing here.

You should have a contract that details the services and equipment being provided, the estimated or agreed upon cost (this will differ from gig to gig and will depend on how you and the client want to operate), the deliverables, project milestones and payment schedule (again, this can be estimated or set in stone, depending on yours and the client's needs). Whether providing an estimate or going with a set cost I typically always request a 50% deposit. When going the estimation route you want to describe what is included with said dollar amount (number of hours spent shooting/editing) and then list the rate for going over those hours. I usually include something along the lines of "estimate includes 10 hours of editing. Any overages will be approved by the client in writing before continuing and will be billed at $$/hr". This way everyone knows what to expect and you're not editing for 13 hours when you only charged for 10. As you get better at estimating you can charge flat rates more often and feel confident that you won't lose money.

As far as what to charge, that's tricky and depends on several variables. There's definitely some good articles here on NFS that delve into that and I would check those out if I was you. I would say that $20/hr is pretty low, specially if you're providing the equipment. If you're getting paid $500/day for taking photos then I would say yes, you can absolutely charge that much for shooting and editing video.

Then there's the fact that it's a rush job - it's a top priority for the client and so for you to make it a top priority you have to put other work aside, which you should be compensated for with an additional fee or hourly surcharge. And in this case, since you know the person at the company and they already commented on the low rate, you can always ask them what their budget is or what they were expecting to pay.

January 16, 2015 at 6:15PM

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John Morse
Producer + Director
2422

I'm sorry but I am going

January 17, 2015 at 12:51AM

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Stephen Herron
Writer/Director
1406

Oops, no edit button yet. sigh... I think 250 a day for starting out is good -500 is really good. If you can set your own price shoot high and work down but be reasonable. I agree with others that you absolutely need at least a base set price agreed upon before starting. But realistically 20 bucks/hr is not bad if this is your first gig and again, if you are just starting out 500/day for photos is really good. It's hard to judge a price without seeing any of your stuff though. Say you shoot a wedding yes, it is a day shoot but the edit is gonna take a very long time so keep that in mind next time you set a price.

Stephen Herron

January 17, 2015 at 2:06AM

To play Devils advocate, I wouldn't go overboard. From the description of the work you've done, by your own admission you've only completed one film - and you're going from that to 500+ a day? Also, some of the advice here has come from industry professionals who've been doing it for years. You can't expect to work to walk into client work and charge the same?

250 was a figure you discussed. She offered more. I'd remind her of that conversation, remind her of the extra video that was added and suggest £350 maybe ? It seems unreasonable to double or triple the fee you originally said. Plus, if it goes well you can charge more for the next video.

At two weeks work (assuming 5 days a week) your making at least 2500 on this which for your second video.

January 17, 2015 at 3:14PM

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Scenes
Shooter / Cutter
92

Do you guys think its the same in Canada? A newbie like myself thinks of 250 is incredible for photos alone.

I was thinking 35$ an hour with my GH4 (photos) and then 50$ an hour for video - Not sure where to price the Post-Production >.<

January 17, 2015 at 9:18PM

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ghaz Zafar
Director, Screen Writer, Cinematography
141

Photos generally are priced lower from what I've seen here in Austin Texas. However, Austin has a saturated market of creatives in these fields and prices are competitive. Educating clients is key for them to understand that if they use YOU or another person with similar services that there isn't a glaring price range. We'll end up cornering our industry into rock bottom wages and always easier to negotiate down from a fair high end price to a manageable one you can live with.

Mauricio Gonzalez Beckmann

January 18, 2015 at 6:54PM, Edited January 18, 6:54PM

Living in a very expensive part of Canada, I charge $200/hr for filming (includes my camera) and $125/hr for post work. I have heard of camera ops in competition rich environments like Montreal or Vancouver, charging $75/hr (just operating, no camera). Now this is for experienced work, not newbies per say, but as long as you are fairly confident in your abilities and are committed to being professional, I wouldn't charge much less than that.

seanmclennan

January 22, 2015 at 4:22PM

Scenes is right, you can't now say "Okay, you know, I spoke to some professional shooters at NFS and they say I should charge you double/tripple, so let's change the agreement" because that would be a greedy solution to the situation- you could research that earlier, now it can break your relationship with the client. You may say now that she can suggest the fee if she thinks it's too low or you can rise it up a little bit and say that if they will be pleased with the product then they can pay you with an industry standard rate.

January 17, 2015 at 9:39PM

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Piotr Matyja
Director/Filmmaker
142

No one said to charge double or triple though. According to the original post, Franklin did some research and came up with $250, which he was then told was a lot less than they expect and he would get a lot more anyways. If he's getting $500/day for shooting stills then around $500/day for video should not be a problem.

John Morse

January 18, 2015 at 1:36AM

For me, it depends on your value..your experiences, skills and not to forget.. your gear...it is not always the operating cost that matters(I've seen people charging super low and I don't know how he calculates his cost) that was my opinion tho.. just try not to charge too low or it will become the 'standard' rate which will affects others.

January 17, 2015 at 9:48PM

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Mohd Nor Ariza Bin Kamil
Cinematographer and Video Editor
248

$250 is crud, but a few shoots at $250 when you are just starting out is normal. To put this in perspective, $25hr for editing (which is paid less than shooting generally) is a normal rate for a freelancer hourly rate, even wedding studios agree to $25 hr for an outsourced editor's hourly rate for example.

$250 for shooting is about that rate, maybe slightly larger by a few buck per hour vs. a wedding editor...then again you're factoring in shooting gear costs more than an iMac and then look at that...you're making less than a run of the mill wedding editor.

$250 is pretty much an unofficial "minimum wage" for day rates, but if it's your first shoot, it's not the end of the world if you take it. Don't stress over it - if it's your first shoot I'd say just do it then evaluate the experience afterwards.

For editing footage, hopefully you're getting more than that if you have to shoot AND edit it. If it's of any help, and these are very rough formulas, but they help if you're just starting out:

1. It will generally take you 5x the amount of raw footage running time to edit COMFORTABLY - ie no mistakes and properly color corrected, allowing for modest changes from sane people

2. For event coverage, you generally get about half of the allotted time for an event on film than what you were scheduled for. In other words, if you are scheduled to shoot an 8 hour event, if you've done your job and kept shooting, you would yield approximately 4 hrs of raw footage - however this can vary. If there wasn't much in terms of speeches and presentations and it's mostly broll, so you could have less than 4hrs. But use this as a guideline.

So if someone asks you to shoot a 6hr event, it would yield, on average for a dedicated shooter, 3 hours of raw footage...5 times 3 hours equals a 15 hr edit (which allows for a non-rushed edit of something you're happy to show the client and allows room for changes from a reasonable person...USUALLY).

And again, this will vary, but it's a decent starting point. Long story short, budget an all day shoot as a 2 day edit PER CAMERA at MINIMUM. If you have a 2nd camera for an all day shoot, then it's a workweek to edit roughly.

January 17, 2015 at 10:10PM

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Gary Hanna
Videographer
171

It's almost like all of us in the video/media/film freelance industry need to settle on certain base level standards to normalize the way clients feel about hiring video production services. You make some great points here that we all need to set rules and EDUCATE clients on the value of the medium.

Mauricio Gonzalez Beckmann

January 18, 2015 at 6:50PM

As a freelancer I always ask for a budget right out. And honestly this is a corporate company. I would mid to high ball them (80-90% of what they are willing to spend so they feel they get a little bit of wiggle room) - only after you get what they are willing to spend. I also do the 9-5 and my time outside of that is extremely valuable, so I must value that when doing projects as well. Don't sell yourself short - all the time and effort is sometimes priceless - especially when they have you at speed dial (which I think is ok -the better vision they have to give you the more information you have to use). Your client will go off of your command as well. If you give them floppy details, they will return you with floppy details. Definitely have set standards you use, but overall every client is different with a different budget, so I would go from there as far as charging goes. And if there is a number you will absolutely not go under then don't go under that. Favors won't get you to your goals. (I exclude creative/experiemtals situations from this, sometimes that hinders the process).

January 17, 2015 at 10:18PM

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Martha Yesenia Juarez
Photographer/Videographer
79

I absolutely love the support of this community... The client was VERY happy, and apparently the one video was already sent to corporate. She also said that her boss (this was a surprise for him) cried at the end of it. Ha ha. I think I will definitely have future jobs with them.

I went the $20 an hour route, although I think I ran a little high. I think she was weary at but she happily paid me. She is already thinking about working on it some more and making it into a recruiting video, three employees tried to recruit me as well.

So if you guys are interested, would you guys like to see it? I'd love some feedback. But I do have to ask is it wrong for me to show it? Since it was made for a big company? No legal issues?

January 18, 2015 at 1:47AM

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Franklin Carpio
Filmmaker/Director/Editor
360

The answer to this question is more pragmatic than you think. Your base rate is actually a matter of punching numbers into a calculator and figuring out what you have to charge to live. You then need some kind of mark up for profit. As you get more experienced and better, you can up your above cost premium. If the person your working for is a friend, ask her who she's hired in the past and what did she pay. This is a quick way to determine what the local market is charging for the work you are doing now. Here is a tool to help you get started. It's not a magic wand or a rate generating crystal ball, but it will give you the idea of how to gauge your rate like a businessman and not just be pulling your rate out of your...

http://www.videomaker.com/article/15577-what-to-charge-freelance-video-h...

January 18, 2015 at 7:18AM

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As someone who books freelance shooting/editing talent on a weekly basis and is also a shooter, I would offer a couple of things. Assuming that your skill set sets are developed enough to do what the project requires of you:

1) The whole corporate video industry is in flux due to an influx of shooter/editors, and will be for the forseeable future. Every project is different, and I don't have the same budget on every project. Your ability to continually get work depends entirely on your ability to bring value to the people who book you by being flex when needed and meeting each project's unique needs in any way you can. Start the conversation with the question, "What's the range in your budget for the role of DP?" and take it from there. This isn't the case with every agency/studio, but it's a much more common circumstance these days than it was 4 or 5 years ago, as more and more shooters are entering the mix.
2) "Going rates" are regional and even local. It depends on where you are and the level of talent in your area, divided by how saturated the market is with talent. Make a decision based your evaluation of where you stand in the marketplace. In a region where everybody is booked 24/7, you can charge more for your skill set because it's in high demand.

Good luck!

Wes

January 18, 2015 at 10:39AM

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Wes Kennison
Creative Director / Shooter, Editor
86

Great advice, I completely agree with your points. It's about not undervaluing our services to a point we corner our industry into rock bottom prices.

Mauricio Gonzalez Beckmann

January 18, 2015 at 6:47PM

Pay is difficult. For those saying 'just charge this' is a bit black/white from my experiences...granted though I am going to give my thoughts based on working in Australia and UK as a freelancer whilst also working full time elsewhere for the majority of this time, but in principle should be the same. For your information if you double the £ figures that would give a good comparison for $US.

Firstly before looking at pay, lay out some ground rules to yourself and to the client. When speaking to the client ask what they want, get an idea in your head how long that will take and then say to them for example 'If I am going to film and edit this piece, I expect it will take me approx 2 days to edit plus the day to film, however if you have any additional requests along the way this might extend this time so we will need to discuss when we come to it.' You need to tell them up front that your not going to spend your life tweaking their video and making 20 different spin offs for free, but in a nice way. At the same time you need to be competitive and if it turns out that you estimated the time to edit it wrong and it instead took you 1 whole week then tough...eventually you'll get quicker at editing or better at estimating :)

I charge £250/day (based on 10hr day) for myself and me using my own equipment in UK which is cheap, sometimes £350 if its more difficult. This doesn't include transport/fuel costs. Most people would charge more but this gets me the work. I offer discounts if its a bigger job obviously, for example if its two weeks straight I'm happy to charge only £180/day for it cos that's still good and I'd much rather myself get the £2500 for the job than be rejected for charging too much only to have some other film undergrad get the job because they were cheaper or 'do it for experience'.

But to protect yourself you need to specify how many changes they get from a video, I usually say one set of changes. So if they come back once and ask for one change that's fine, but afterwards it will cost them day rates to make the changes. That way at worst you will have to spend an extra half day or so fixing their video, but if they come back and say 'actually can we now have the sky purple instead of blue' then you can reply, 'sure, however as agreed this will incur an extra day rate fee of £250, are you ok with this?' Obviously its up to you if you actually wanted to charge for a little change, if they asked just for one extra minor change to a title (for example) you may wish to offer this for free, or even a small charge like £50 in the hope that it gives you a good rep and they will use you again in the future. You are the business man here, and you decide whats good for your business!

Remember that this industry has become very competitive and expect to regularly loose out to someone cheaper, even if you are worlds better than them. These days the difference from Director/DOP Vs Camera Operator or VFX Artist Vs Editor seems to have all been forgotten thanks to the internet self proclaimed titles...so base your fee on how much your happy to receive for the job. Simple. The better you get at filming/editing then the more you will eventually be able to charge because your name is out there you'll be getting a tonne of offers in :) But for now you need to weigh up the options. Don't stick to a firm day rate like others might suggest, this may just mean you will not be competitive. Give discounts where possible, but by god let them know they are getting a discount.

So if we look back at our original comment I would say something like this: 'If I am going to film and edit this piece, I expect it will take me approx 2 days to edit plus the day to film. Usually this would be 3 days at £250/day but I'm happy to do this whole job for £650. As part of this I will give you a first draft of the video and happy for you to make some changes to the draft but any additional changes after this might incur some extra charges. Also if you have any additional requests along the way this might extend this time so we will need to discuss when we come to it.'

Hope you get a good deal with this job though, I know most of us on here have had plenty of bad experiences dealing with film clients, but that's where you learn.

January 18, 2015 at 11:59AM

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Jarrad Cody
Guy who likes film stuff
316

So I am a bit confused. It seems like everyone is suggesting that $250 a day is about $20 an hour. I am also a new to the freelance work and work a full time job. I have been going with a $40 an hour rate with $250 as the day rate for starting out, and am currently upping that rate. I am in Northern California, and speaking to other videographers that is what they suggest as someone else mentioned it as basically a minimum wage. If you take 250 and divide it by 8 it is about 31 an hour. As I said I quote 40 an hour so basically after six hours you get a break. 20 times 8 is 160... So I am a little lost on the math that is being done. And $500 for a wedding seems very low to me as a photographer or videograher, at least for the area I am in. I would call $200 doing a wedding for free, after you consider just the cost of gas, fancy DVD cases, licencing music, and other misc cost. With even a low $250 day rate I would consider $1200 the minimum for doing a weeding (that works out to about a week of the day rate, and considering about a days worth of pay will be spent on just costs, that is pretty good price when you consider it).

Anyhow $250 really is a real min wage when you consider what your time is worth, plus all the equipment you need, and need to up keep, and need to replace. Plus the government is going to take their fair share in income tax and licencing fees. Plus consider the cost of your car, gas, insurance, licence, plus the use of your office, electricity... when you really break it down there is a ton of overhead.

January 18, 2015 at 12:03PM

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Joshua Reafsnyder
Independent Media Producer ~ VidPro.Biz ~
86

Its high for someone who has no experience. But he has quite a few projects under his belt. Assuming he knows something about making videos, $250 isn't high. Its around $15/hr after taxes and expenses.
That's teacher level wages. Not unfair for someone coming out of college getting there first job. Which is what I compare this to.

Josh Wilkinson

January 19, 2015 at 11:21AM

250 is low but it's a begging but with each job you must up the money.

January 18, 2015 at 3:51PM, Edited January 18, 3:51PM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7186

I've discussed this before on other film/video sites. The most important thing to do is not to UNDERVALUE our services to clients. Other industries have price control and we all in this industry should be competitive but fair in our pricing too. We'll shoot ourselves in the foot if folks go shoot for $200 here, $500 there and do not educate our clients on why videos cost as much as they do. Educate your clients. Show them proof and reason why your services deserve a fair market value price. Each project is different, but don't undervalue yourself just to get a gig/job. My 2 cents. Good conversation and one we should all continue to discuss as technology/media/delivery methods change.

January 18, 2015 at 6:45PM

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Mauricio Gonzalez Beckmann
Creative Manager / Editor / TV Producer / D.P.
74

The truth. Thakns Mauricio! Absolutely the truth.

Jake &quot;The Film Guy&quot; Keenum

January 18, 2015 at 8:53PM

I'm pretty staggered that you can go out, buy a camera, and on your first shooting job expect $250 a day minimum wage? That must be US specific?

Here in the UK it's getting pretty grim to be honest. £250 - £350 is about th going rate for a days shoot from experienced professionals who have been doing it for years. But jobs like that are becoming increasingly rare. The experienced folk at £250 are competing with the guy who just bought a DSLR camera who charges £200 a day. He competes with the guy who buys a DSLR next week who charges £100 a day.. Who competes with the guy who buys a GH5 over summer and shoots for £50 a day. The low to mid end of the corporate world is imploding.

I personally once lost a job that used to be shot with a full crew and broadcast cameras to a solo student with a DSLR that charged £50 for the weeks work. The client said "we know it won't be as good, but it will be good enough".

This has kinda turned into a rant. Lol. I've been in the Industry 15 years and maybe I'm just old and grumpy. But, boy, things have changed. But it must be way different in the U.S. if anyone can pick up a camera and earn hundreds a day on their first shoot? Is there just not as many video folk out there, because you can't throw a rock without hitting ten new production companies every six months in my local area here in the UK.

Also, it's interesting that you guys charge less for editing? Over here that's usually double sometimes triple a days shooting.

January 18, 2015 at 10:20PM

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Scenes
Shooter / Cutter
92

This is his first corporate job. But this isn't his first shoot. If it was, yeah it would be insane to think you can go charge $250 for a day + editing.
This guy has experience shooting though, I compare it more to someone fresh out of college getting his first job. Very low end of the pro price range.
After taxes and business expenses that is about what a service profession here makes. Plumber, teacher, etc..
I don't know taxes/etc in the UK, but conversion puts that a ~175 pounds a day.

Editing depends. Most guys I know charge less per hour but its 3-5x the number of hours.

Josh Wilkinson

January 19, 2015 at 11:27AM

This is his first corporate job. But this isn't his first shoot. If it was, yeah it would be insane to think you can go charge $250 for a day + editing.
This guy has experience shooting though, I compare it more to someone fresh out of college getting his first job. Very low end of the pro price range.
After taxes and business expenses that is about what a service profession here makes. Plumber, teacher, etc..
I don't know taxes/etc in the UK, but conversion puts that a ~175 pounds a day.

Editing depends. Most guys I know charge less per hour but its 3-5x the number of hours.

Josh Wilkinson

January 19, 2015 at 11:27AM, Edited January 19, 11:27AM

This is his first corporate job. But this isn't his first shoot. If it was, yeah it would be insane to think you can go charge $250 for a day + editing.
This guy has experience shooting though, I compare it more to someone fresh out of college getting his first job. Very low end of the pro price range.
After taxes and business expenses that is about what a service profession here makes. Plumber, teacher, etc..
I don't know taxes/etc in the UK, but conversion puts that a ~175 pounds a day.

Editing depends. Most guys I know charge less per hour but its 3-5x the number of hours.

Josh Wilkinson

January 19, 2015 at 11:27AM

January 19, 2015 at 10:21AM

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I strongly recommend staying away from an hourly wage as this will often lead to pricing arguments with your client. For example, your client is only on-set for the one hour that you're actually shooting, but you spent another 3 hours traveling and setting-up and breaking-down your production gear. So your client thinks that they should only pay you for the one hour that you actually shot, and knows nothing about the additional time you spent making their shoot happen.

Instead you should either price yourself by the project ( a total price to deliver a finished video for project X ), or by a half-day or full-day fee. In most cases even small jobs will require at least half a day to travel there, set-up, shoot, break the set, and travel back.

This also helps to weed out the problem clients who are going to be counting every last dollar they spend, and will constantly put pressure on you to lower your price.

One last thing: Remember that it's a lot easier to lower your price on a job to make your client happy, than it is to try and raise your price. So if I quote a client $1,400 for a full day shoot with gear and crew, and they come back to me and say that all they have in the budget is $1,000, it's fairly easy for me to figure out how to lower my price and still make a decent living. ( i.e. bring less gear, do simpler set-ups, shoot less takes, etc... )

January 19, 2015 at 1:21PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
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Sound counsel as always Guy. I hope the NFS guys promote your rank to Jedi at some point. Or Grandmaster. :) All levity aside, thank you for the feedback, both as it pertains to the gent that started this thread as well as myself.

Jake &quot;The Film Guy&quot; Keenum

January 19, 2015 at 2:56PM

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