August 9, 2017 at 3:34PM

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In-house Videographer equipment Requirements

Hey all,

Not new to NoFilmSchool but first post here and I have a question. Is it standard for an in-house videographer to provide their company with equipment?

I am a freelancer and have an interview with a company that wants to improve their video production by hiring on a part time videographer. It is in the landscape I work in, product and real estate, but I have a feeling that they want me to provide the equipment. I cant bring in $20k of my investments without making top dollar but they do not want to spend the money that a freelancer charges. My fs5 body alone rents for $500 for a few days, let alone lenses, mics, lighting and all the little things.

I have researched the question and haven't found many answers.

What is standard practice? I know they will sh*t themselves when I tell them I need a $5k + budget to get them the proper gear they need and a computer on top of that. Any advise would be greatly appreciated and thank you in advance!

10 Comments

As a part of an in-house team for quite a while, the best you can do is present them with options. Give them a minimum and mid-range package and explain in detail the differences and what the extra money buys them. You have to be able to effectively communicate with them, without being confusing. You can't talk too much camera lingo and expect them to understand what you're talking about, unless you explain a few buzzwords as you're going. Its always a careful balance=) Have them show you the kind of video they want on Youtube and tell them what it took to make it, as best you can. Better yet, find content you think they want. Have all your ammo ready to go. Low end and mid-range/high end and ask them what they like about it and then explain what it took to do it. It proves you know what you're talking about, should build trust, and help you get a better feel for their needs. If all they want is the minimum, you know where you stand. Think of the home make-over shows on HGTV. Take Property Brothers. They show them what they're asking for but can't afford, then they show them what they actually CAN afford.

If they don't want to purchase their own gear, you obviously have to charge to rent yours and explain this is standard practice. Gear is always a part of the freelance fee and that varies according to the level of gear they require. You know this. But If they don't know what they require you have to explain what they need, according to what they want. Its all about managing expectations.

If they think $5k is a lot of money for gear, you have to give them a dose of reality and educate them. If they refuse to take your advice or don't believe you, RUN. They don't know what they want yet. Have them call you when they have a better idea.

August 9, 2017 at 10:25PM

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Josh.R
Motion Designer/Predator
970

Making videos for business's website is all the indignation these days. They're attractive, instructive, and help earn your client's trust by hitting a face to your variety of brand.
But, it can seem worrying to get a video formed because of all the time and expenditures that go into the procedure. Small corporations with small funds might be uncertain to hire a digital production company: https://www.ingic.ae/web-design/ to handle this venture for them, so they possibly choose to use an in-house videographer. Though, that may not be the finest choice...

August 10, 2017 at 10:26AM

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Thank you both! So it is not standard practice for in-house videographers to provide their own equipment. Thats what I thought and felt. I am better off freelancing this work for them but I doubt thats an option for them. I will give them a rough idea of purchasing equipment, renting mine or freelancing. Like most jobs these days they want their videographer to do their photography and social media. I'll pass on the social, I can do it but I wont do 3 jobs in one for a measly $40k Either way thank you again!

August 10, 2017 at 12:05PM

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Any in-house production job will require being a jack of all trades. There is no room for being a specialist in most places, unless its a larger team. Everyone has their speciality of course, but you'll need to wear many hats, especially since you'll be solo. If your potential employer doesn't understand the production side of things, part of your job is/will be educating them through your expertise and experience. Managing expectations.
How long things take...a 5 min video doesn't take 5 minutes to edit;) You can't expect something that looks like it costs $100k to only cost $100. All these sorts of questions that are swirling around in their heads, have to be answered early on.

Good luck.

Josh.R

August 11, 2017 at 8:34PM

obviously I don't know you or this situation, but seems a bit naive all the way around. Naive from the company stand point and possibly naive from seeking our input where if you are a true professional having this figured out already. Not being snarky here, kind of like the surgeon saying "where is that tool with the sharp edge" Since you have asked my advice, here it is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-mOKMq19zU

August 11, 2017 at 3:33PM

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By calling me naive, you are infering that my question is stupid, un-necessary or unworthy.

na·ive
(of a person or action) showing a lack of experience, wisdom, or judgment.

Whats a lack of wisdom? Stupidity. We could use other words but stupidity will suffice.

The true professionals provided answers. You don't even know the definition of your own words. Think before you troll Lofar.

Aaron Michael Smith

August 12, 2017 at 12:26PM

There is no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid answers. It's obvious you do not know the answer, therefore the only naive one here is you.

"Obviously I don't know you or this situation" well, I just laid out the situation for you. Reading comprehension is important when you want to troll on the internet. Thankfully there are professionals like Josh and Afif who know what they are talking about.

Ever herd of byoc? Employers will try to get out of expenses if they can.

August 11, 2017 at 8:21PM, Edited August 11, 8:22PM

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Stupid and naive are not the same thing, Naive is not knowing the difference. Your own words reveal the answer.

Lofar Fopah

August 12, 2017 at 10:46AM

By the way, no way you should be using your own gear if its a full time job, unless you're renting it to them every time you touch it. If they don't want to spend the money to buy the gear, they'll have to rent it one way or another. If they can't accept that, they don't get it or aren't committed....run=)

August 11, 2017 at 8:40PM, Edited August 11, 8:40PM

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Josh.R
Motion Designer/Predator
970

Thank you Josh! I appreciate it! That's what I was thinking but being a freelancer I wasn't sure about common practice for employment.

August 12, 2017 at 12:29PM

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