January 27, 2015 at 12:33PM

2

"Run and gun" lighting?

Im doing some work for a school district in the form of two promos for two middle schools. They are having to close a school so they need to advertise each of the other two to potential parents. Anyway, because Ill be shooting a good amount of B-roll, I need a good way to quickly set up some lighting for kids who are running around like hell, outside and in. (inside being easier) Whats the best way to go about this "run and gun" style of unpredictable subject lighting?

16 Comments

Portable battery powered LED lights with assistants to run around aiming the lights at your subjects. If you don't have a huge budget the light I would recommend is this one...

Aputure Amaran HR672W High CRI95+ LED Video Light Panel : $278 US with Batteries
http://www.ebay.com/itm/171508409261?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

January 27, 2015 at 12:47PM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30084

Guy, Are these durable lights? I'm looking for some new travel gear that is easy to pack. I dig the price.

Thanks,

zach warner

February 3, 2015 at 11:52AM

In thecinecity.com you have a good options too.

January 27, 2015 at 2:24PM

0
Reply
avatar
Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7157

I think you should just shoot with a fast lens and take the ol' Nolan approach when on a budget: shoot by a window.

January 27, 2015 at 2:26PM

0
Reply
avatar
Jake Keenum
Filmmaker
2151

I agree with Jake in using the "Following" method of shoot by a window. But, outdoors is an even larger concern to me than indoors. I have a bounce, with gold and silver options, which will no doubt be used, but the LEDs seem like a good option. Anybody have experience with can lighting outdoors? does that work out?

January 27, 2015 at 8:05PM

14
Reply

Lighting outdoors is all about modifying sunlight. So, bouncing and diffusing, and both are really important. I've never found an LED that makes any remarkable difference for lighting outdoors. They just don't have the punch.

Having a bounce is good for fill. The sun (on a clear day) is a really hard light source, and needs diffusion. A silk of some kind, or one of those all-in-one foldable reflector/diffuser things will work well. Or find a shady area.

Come prepared with either a lot of sandbags and support for reflectors and such, a second person to hold them, or both.

David S.

January 27, 2015 at 9:12PM

IF you have access to some 750 Watt... if you are inside then just bounce them ;-)

January 27, 2015 at 9:20PM

1
Reply
avatar
Wentworth Kelly
Director/DP/Colorist/Drone Op
2034

With sunlight your only choice is pretty much a bounce-fill reflector, but with outdoor over-cast days or with indoor shooting a portable battery powered LED light can make a big difference when shooting on the fly with no time for set-up.

January 28, 2015 at 10:26AM

16
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30084

get a large collapsible 5 in 1 reflector with a shoot thru
Bounce goes a long way

January 30, 2015 at 10:40AM

0
Reply
Kazu Okuda
Filmmaker
1516

I have one of those, and definitely rely on it

Wyatt E Otero

January 30, 2015 at 1:48PM, Edited January 30, 1:48PM

Fast lenses + fast ISO + for fill: large daylight chinaball (on a boom would be ideal).

January 30, 2015 at 5:59PM

4
Reply
Jaan Shenberger
designer/animator & live-action director/DP
1276

Fast lens will give you a lovely depth of field. Of course depends on how much you want to spend, but I've found for news purposes many battery powered LEDs aren't powerful for outdoors. These http://nila.tv/varsa/ are fantastic - run off v-locks and are amazing competing with the sun. Honestly a bounce and fleckie will make a huge difference!

February 3, 2015 at 1:33AM

0
Reply
Suey
Promotions / Production
95

i use a simple Stellar Lighting Systems CEL-R18C 18" Fluorescent Ring Light with Dimmer in a school district setting. I am the district communications specialist that takes care of advertising/photography/video/social media/websites. the light has some limits but in most cases it really gets the job done.

February 3, 2015 at 8:42AM

0
Reply
shawn
Media Tech Specialist
86

Well, I shoot with a mark II so I don't usually have to worry about adding light. But, in a situation like this, I will often just bounce light off the ceiling. It's a very lean way to evenly light a room. I just use a flood, color it to daylight (since there likely will be natural light as well) and point the light straight up. There is certainly a balance of how high you want the source / what part and how much of the ceiling you want to hit. And with kids - make sure you sand bag those puppies and tape your wires. You'll also want make sure that your source isn't so low that it leaks unbounced light anywhere - so have some black wrap.

February 3, 2015 at 8:52AM

9
Reply

If the kids are running around like hell, as you say, then there is no way you are going to be able to light them. For that kind of B-roll just use a good lens and natural light. I edited a whole series of school videos that used this techinque and they still looked great.
If you are doing planned shots where the subject is standing still, then yes. Use the bounce. If you have an HMI or a powerful LED fresnel bring as backup incase it's a cloudy day... that is about the only way you are going to get enough light on a subject outdoors. A light panel isn't going to do much for you outside.
For regular b-roll I wouldn't worry too much about lighting, inside or outside. You have to remember here's no way they are paying you enough, nor giving you enough time, to properly light every b-roll shot. You just need a few kickass b-roll shots that are well composed with some movement to them and light the hell out of those. Those will be your signature shots that you can open with or whatever.

February 3, 2015 at 4:41PM

5
Reply
avatar
Patrick Walter
Director//Cinematographer//Gaffer
74

>>>A light panel isn't going to do much for you outside.

I've seen a few shoots here in Toronto, where they had one or two people tracking their actors with battery operated 1x1 LED lights as they walked around the city on a cloudy day, and the LED lights totally opened up their faces and could be dimmed or brightened to match what the sky was doing. These lights would be useless on a sunny day, but with overcast outdoor conditions or pretty much anywhere indoors they did the trick.

February 3, 2015 at 6:23PM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30084

Here's a review by Eric Naso where he shows how he uses the compact Aputure lights outside on a cloudy day...

http://eriknaso.com/2015/01/11/aputure-hr672s-led-video-lights-first-look/

February 4, 2015 at 8:20AM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30084

>>>Guy, Are these durable lights? I'm looking for some new travel gear that is easy to pack.

Like most light weight gear these lights are made out of plastic, but they should last as long as you pack them properly when you transport them to and from your location.

February 4, 2015 at 8:24AM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30084

The Aputure HR672S are a new model. The S is for spot and the 672 is how many LEDS it has. I like the narrow focus for LED lights because I need the punch and they look great shot through a silk like the 24x36 Road Rag. The HR672S should be showing up at Amazon very soon. Like Guy stated they are all plastic and need to be taken care of, but for the price and the performance they are great and come with two big ass batteries to boot. They are rated at 95+ CRI. I didn't see any green spike issues at all. Haven't had to use any correction on them.

February 4, 2015 at 7:15PM

7
Reply
avatar
Erik Naso
eriknaso.com
245

Your Comment