» Posts Tagged ‘35mm’

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CineVerse Camera Comparison ChartDiscerning cinematographers know that different jobs and projects often require different tools. With digital cinema technology proliferating at an incredible rate, cinematographers now have such a wide variety of camera systems to choose from that the process of deciding which one meets the technical and aesthetic needs of any given project can often be entirely overwhelming. If only all of the relevant technical information for each high-end digital cinema camera could be aggregated into one place, maybe into the form of a well-organized chart –Luckily for us, Tom Fletcher over at CineVerse, a nationwide rental house, put together just such a chart with all of the major digital cinema cameras on the market today (the high-end ones, at least), and it’s an insanely helpful graphic that puts our top-of-the-line digital cinema technology into perspective. More »

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Quentin Tarantino Cannes 2014 Press ConferenceQuentin Tarantino has not been shy about his distaste for all things digital. He has stayed true to shooting on 35mm film, but most theaters and distributors are moving away from projecting in the format. Speaking at the Cannes Film Festival (where a 20th anniversary screening of Pulp Fiction is the only film showing in 35mm), Tarantino again reiterated his displeasure about digital projection, going so far as to say that the loss of 35mm projection means that what he knew as cinema is dead. More »

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Dale McCready Atlantis Season 2 Camera TestCamera technology has come a long way in the last 5 years. Dale McCready, the DP on the TV show Atlantis, normally shoots on 35mm for the show, but wanted to see how newer solutions stack up and could be intercut with the film material for Season 2. Since he already knows the ALEXA well, he took the 6K DRAGON from RED and his Canon 5D Mark III shooting Magic Lantern RAW and tested all sorts of different combinations of filters on the cameras. More »

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Film vs. Digital. Celluloid vs. Silicon. While the debate is beginning to die down due to economics and advancements in digital cinema cameras, a documentary on the subject called Side by Side takes a look at the issue with some of the premiere directors and cinematographers. We mentioned a few months ago that the doc, produced by Keanu Reeves, was available to buy, but now the film is available to watch right now on Netflix. Click through for some clips from the movie. More »

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When considering lens options for purchase or rental, certain criteria may stand out to you more than others. This depends on what you shoot most often, or what a project demands. Perhaps as a run-and-gun doc shooter, you simply need the extra stop you get with one 85mm lens for the same price as another that doesn’t vignette as badly. Or you gave up a contrast performance you really preferred in favor of the IS lens of greater overall value. But what if money were no object, and focal length and speed were matched? An aspect you’d find yourself evaluating closely is the way each handles its bokeh, or de-focused areas of the image. DigitalRev’s latest Battle of the Bokeh is a comparison between Canon, Nikon, and Sigma 35mm f/1.4 lenses in precisely this spirit — with some unexpected results. More »

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Lomography is both an analog-based film movement as well as a manufacturer of specialty products conducive to such an activity — these include the LomoKino 35mm stills-to-motion camera and the (successfully) Kickstarted Smartphone Film Scanner app/device. Lomography’s goods aren’t for everybody, or every project — but the company has some exciting news for the analog enthusiast in all of us, especially while production of 35mm film seems to be slowing down. Lomography will be releasing a new ISO 400 35mm color negative stock called LomoChrome Purple, inspired by the surreal quality of Kodak’s discontinued Aerochrome infrared stock — read on to check out the details. More »

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It’s not often that an excerpt of a film is enough to satisfy me, but that was exactly the case with a clip from Lynne Ramsay’s (Ratcatcher, Morvern Callar, We Need to Talk About Kevin) short film Swimmer. As part of the 2012 Olympics, a number of British filmmakers were commissioned to make films, and they were shown before the games in London earlier this year. While it doesn’t seem like all of them have been released in full anywhere else, if you did happen to see them, I just might be a little jealous, especially since the excerpt from Ramsay’s gorgeous black and white 35mm short film is so enticing. Click through to check it out. More »

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If you didn’t watch last year’s premiere of FX networks’ American Horror Story, you missed out on some seriously daring television. There was sex (and scandal), there were scares (and some blood-splatter), and there were spirits — though which characters were truly flesh-and-blood and which were a bit more ghostly didn’t become clear until much later  – all in the context of an addicting melodrama. The series (created by Nip/Tuck and Glee masterminds Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk) recently began its second season with some cast-members returning (to play different roles), but the setting has been moved to a darkly-imagined Massachusetts mental institution. One vital piece of the puzzle that is AHS is its look, which is being achieved on 35mm film — especially notable when FX’s own Sons of Anarchy and Justified, for instance, have opted for Alexa and EPIC respectively. Courtesy American Cinematographer, here’s a look at the shooting style of this aggressively original program — and just in time for the show’s Halloween episode premiere! More »

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About a year ago, the last motion picture film camera rolled off the assembly line, marking a historic day in film history. Now we have Fujifilm deciding that it will no longer be producing motion picture film, and Kodak is continuing its bankruptcy proceedings, selling off its still photography division, and ending its printer business. Just five years ago, the idea that motion picture film may be going the way of the dinosaur was unimaginable. Sure, RED had come along and given us the first real glimpse of the true digital replacement, but the technology still seemed a long ways off. With the economic downturn — and certainly some mismanagement along the way — Kodak was the first to show signs of danger, and now Fuji sees the writing on the wall, and is getting out of the game before it’s too late. But what else will contribute to the demise of film? More »

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Digital vs film. It’s the debate of our generation of filmmakers, and one we’ve all heard before. Some rave about the advances in digital technology and the convenience factor. Some lament the non-organic look of digital, or the fact that the on-set workflow has changed from artistry to assembly.  There are merits to both of these arguments, and in the new documentary Side by Side from Producer (yes, Producer) Keanu Reeves, these arguments are explored and commented on. Click through for a great trailer featuring some of your favorite filmmakers (Scorsese, Lynch, Rodriguez, Nolan) weighing in on the debate. More »

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Last week we had the terrific short film Rest. The guys over at Short of the Week, and Andrew S Allen, are not only ambitious, but have some great taste. At NoFilmSchool we’ve covered them before with their animated short The Thomas Beale Cipher. If you haven’t seen it you should drop what you’re doing and watch it, and then come back here and check out this short, Moving Takahashi, that centers around a mover and a suicidal rich girl. More »

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Film is beautiful. It’s going to be around for years to come. Plenty of feature films and TV shows are still being shot on film, and used film cameras will remain a viable rental market for a long time. But in the last several months, the major manufacturers of motion picture cameras — ARRI, Panavision and Aaton — have all ceased production of film cameras. Celluloid, you’ve had a great 123-year run. So long, and thanks for all the fish! More »

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Redrock Micro has launched their M3 35mm Lens Adapter, billed as “the definitive 35mm lens adapter for achieving remarkable film look with your existing video camera.” However, the first question that comes to my mind is why anyone would spend $1,320 on a 35mm lens adapter when the same amount of money could get you a quality DSLR with an actual large sensor (like, say, the Canon 60D). No matter how good a 35mm adapter is, it is not going to offer you the low-light sensitivity of a true large sensor. Seeing this reasoning, Redrock has attempted to answer this HDSLR question: More »