» Posts Tagged ‘3D’

Description image

ben knight DamNation red epic

Sure, we’re all a bunch of gear junkies, but in some ways we know, a camera is a camera is a camera. It’s just as important for every production to have a good (or at least decent) concept, and therefore, a good reason to use one camera over the other! From scrapping a 3D production to saving up for six years to buy a RED EPIC, the excerpts below from a handful of different, but very talented, SXSW filmmakers are centered around one question: what did you shoot on and why? More »

Description image

great gatsby btwBaz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby might’ve been met with mixed reviews, with some reviewers saying that style was chosen over substance, but the film’s visuals are as beautifully over-the-top and champagne-poppingly glamorous as the director’s other work, including Moulin Rouge! and Romeo + JulietOne thing, however, that Luhrmann did differently on The Great Gatsby, as opposed to his other projects, was shoot in 3D, and cinematographer Simon Duggan explains in a Cinefii interview how 3D helps to add another perceivable dimension to not only a movie screen, but to characters as well. More »

Description image

Zero Point Trailer Oculus RiftTraditional 3D viewing may be losing its steam in the home because of a lack of content (and the glasses and all sorts of other reasons), but that doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll be watching content on flat screens forever. Oculus Rift, the virtual reality headset made for 3D gaming, can also be used for all sorts of other content, including movies. The first video made specifically for the Oculus Rift, is actually a documentary called Zero Point, which is actually about the Oculus Rift device. They have now released an interactive trailer for the film which you can watch online. More »

Description image

JunkyardOne of the most underappreciated cinematic art forms is the short film, the sting, perhaps, felt more so in dramas (it takes less time to unpack a joke than a heart). However, Dutch filmmaker Hisko Hulsing’s dramatic animated short, Junkyard, which has won 22 festival awards, tells a more amazingly vivid and sincere story in 18 minutes than many live action features do in 90. Directors Notes catches up with Hulsing as he details his 6-year filmmaking process: how he  financed the film, composed the soundtrack, and brought the incredible oil-painted backgrounds and 2D and 3D animations to life. More »

Description image

Young RivalChances are you’ve spent your fair share of precious time looking at (or trying to look at) one of those Magic Eye posters. You know what I’m talking about — those pictures that look like nothing but static until you relax your eyes enough to see the hidden T-Rex or Eiffel Tower pop out in 3D. These random dot autostereograms have been used for over half a century, but it wasn’t until recently that director Jared Raab created the first random dot autostereogram music video for the band Young Rival’s single “Black is Good”. Continue on to see (or try to see) the video and learn how they pulled it off. More »

Description image

3D renderIf you work a lot in visual effects you know that creating stunning 3D objects and environments in After Effects and similar VFX programs is no easy task. There are plenty of tutorials out there that break down processes step by step, but Charles Yeager of AE Tuts+ offers some tips on how to get the most out of your renders when using Video Copilot’s Element 3D After Effects plugin by simply changing a few render and output settings. Check out the tutorial after the jump. More »

Description image

The Bear & The HareSo I totally get we’re still in November and that seeing the Christmas decorations already polluting every inch of your local mall has got your blood boiling and that you expect No Film School to be a ho ho haven from such premature revelry but just bear with me (sorry couldn’t resist) as you take a look at Blink’s heartwarming spot for John Lewis’ The Bear & The Hare that, dare I say it, actually captures the spirit of Christmas. Get in the seasonal spirit after the jump: More »

Description image

BTS Bot and Dolly BoxIn case you missed it, a few days ago we shared an incredible short film entitled Box, produced by design and engineering studio Bot & Dolly that must be seen to be believed. Using projection mapping, robots, and two 4×8 canvases, Bot & Dolly create an inspiring 3D landscape, all in-camera, all in real-time. And, as promised, the behind the scenes video has been released, giving us an inside look at the incredible digital “magic tricks.” So, if you were dying to know just how Bot & Dolly did it, read on. More »

Description image

Bot and Dolly_The BoxEvery now and again you’ll see something that makes you stop and stare — eyes wide and mouth agape. Something that uses the film medium in a whole new way. This is one of those things. Bot & Dolly, a design and engineering studio based out of San Francisco surely combine automation, robotics, and filmmaking in a beautiful and awe-inspiring way. They recently shared their short film entitled Box that uses the live projection mapping of 3D computer graphics on two 2D screens attached to robotic arms to create stunning 3D effects — and everything on-screen is captured in-camera. If that description doesn’t do it for you, and it most certainly won’t (or shouldn’t,) check out the video after the jump. More »

Description image

little freakBirthdays are normally a time of joy and a celebration of the extra year you’ve just spent in the world. Not so for the star of Edwin Schaap’s animated short Little Freak – who despite the skilful nature of his hands in the craft of carving has been condemned to live life as an object of horror and disgust as a side-show freak. Watch his eloquent plea for recognition after the break. More »

Description image

The Man Who Saw a BoatThe tranquility of a life spent living beneath the waves flows from the screen in Vancouver Film School student Henrique Barone’s 2D/3D mixed animated short The Man Who Saw a Boat. When it came to the film’s development however, Barone had to dive deep to find a story worth telling, gathering the technical tools he needed along the way. Click through to watch the short and find out more. More »

Description image

Godard 3D glassesAbout a month ago we shared that French filmmaker and all-around storytelling genius (obviously I’m biased) Jean-Luc Godard was dipping his toe in the 3D water, with Adieu Au Langage, a film about “a man and his wife who no longer speak the same language.” For those of you who were as astonished as I was that Godard was trying his hand at 3D filmmaking, with a camera setup he and his cinematographer built no less, here’s another thing that might be of interest to you: Adieu Au Langage isn’t even Godard’s first 3D film. Hit the jump to see trailers for the experimental 3X3D as well as his latest feature. More »

Description image

James CameronIf you’re planning on shooting an independent 3D picture in the near future, just — hold on. Wait. Take a breath, and ask yourself, “Will this film make 3D filmmaking look bad? Will it remind people of the bad horror flicks of the 70s and 80s? Will it, most importantly, disappoint James Francis Cameron?” Earlier this week, the Academy award-winning director sounded off at Mexico City’s technology forum TagDF about the current state of 3D, why Man of Steel and Iron Man 3 didn’t need it, and how post-Avatar 3D films are cheapening the medium that he invented. More »

Description image

Jean Luc Godard on set adieuLet me make this clear: Jean-Luc Godard is my favorite director of all time. There is no close second. So, the prospect of him shooting in 3D immediately altered and matured my view on 3D filmmaking, because, after all, Godard can do no wrong — even when he does. His latest film Adieu Au Langage (Farewell to Language) was shot in 3D, but perhaps not for the reasons you’d think — not because it’s attractive and popular and cool looking. For Godard, the draw came from it being new enough that it “doesn’t have any rules yet.” More »

Description image

Color spaces and color models can be difficult to wrap your head around completely. There are additive and subtractive spaces, like RGB vs. CMYK, and different format/display technologies, like analog’s YUV vs. digital’s YCbCr — all of which you may have to traverse to achieve the final ‘look’ you want for your imagery. Not to mention that many color spaces are not absolute, meaning they don’t profile device-specific color representation. This can certainly induce a bit of a headache for newcomers to the color science realm. A great post by photographer Mark Meyer, featured recently on PetaPixel, explains how you can quite literally better-orient yourself to color spaces and models by, well, modeling them — in 3D open suite Blender, no less. More »

Description image

If you look back fondly on those days of seeing an image reveal itself point by point as you worked your way through a dot-to-dot puzzle, then the new video for Foals’ My Number from Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor, better known as the pronoun ‘Us,’ is going to fill you full of sequential number hunting nostalgia. More »

Description image

In creating computer generated imagery, reference photographs of real-life objects may assist modeling, texturing, and animating a 3D object. In animation, this practice translates into something called motion capture, or ‘performance capture’ when facial expressions are the focus (see: Avatar). Fixed reference points on an object or surface help artists recreate something virtually, but Microsoft XBox 360′s Kinect technology is actually able to recognize shape and motion on its own, turning you into a full-body video game controller in real-time. The new Lynx A Camera looks to take this a step further. Meet the world’s first ‘point-and-shoot’ camera that can model and capture the geometry, texture, and motion of anything you aim it at, right before your eyes. More »

Description image

Academy Award nominees are rarely available for free (legally) online before the actual Oscar ceremonies, but that’s exactly the case with the short animation Paperman, produced with the help of Disney. The film is getting attention for more than just the nomination — the technique used is an interesting blend of 2D hand-drawn animation mixed with a 3D world. It’s not the first time that we’ve seen techniques like this used, but it may very well bring back some of the things many of us loved about traditional 2D animation. Check out Paperman and some behind the scenes videos below. More »

Description image

Digital technology is racing to replace celluloid in the theatrical space at an incredible pace. With many of the top professionals in the industry moving solely to digital, the landscape is changing drastically. Just recently we had one of the more respected cinematographers working today, Roger Deakins, talking about his experience using the Arri Alexa. Now, Ridley Scott gives us a little bit about his experience working with the RED EPIC in 3D and also explains how we can get people back into movie theaters: More »

Description image

Loom, a science fiction short film directed by Luke Scott (son of Ridley and nephew of Tony), was used by RED to show off their 4K 3D projector at NAB 2012. The last time we talked about Luke Scott, he had just directed a viral video for his father Ridley’s Prometheus. While you won’t be able to watch it in 4K (or in 3D), the H.264 file is remarkably clean. The film is set in the mid-21st century and stars Giovanni Ribisi as a scientist working at a laboratory attempting to grow meat for human consumption. While he plays worker bee during the day, he’s got a secret that could land him in jail. More »