» Posts Tagged ‘5dtorgb’

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Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 9.1.5 Magic Lantern SupportWhile there are some workflow solutions to get your Magic Lantern RAW files into the more video-friendly CinemaDNG format (like RAWMagic), Blackmagic has just released an update to DaVinci Resolve that gives support to the regular DNG files (both CinemaDNG and DNG use the .DNG file type). These files, created by applications like raw2dng, are slightly different than CinemaDNG, which is why they previously did not work in Resolve. With the newest 9.1.5 update, they will now drop right into the program after they’ve been converted from the .RAW format. Click through for a look at the rest of the changes in this update. More »

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rawmagic04There have been a few programs floating around to convert the .RAW files from Magic Lantern on the PC and Mac, but getting the files into a usable form takes a little bit of effort, as these programs were turning the files into DNG first, which aren’t compatible with programs like DaVinci Resolve (since DNG is a stills format). Now we have a better solution as Thomas Worth from Rarevision (who created 5DtoRGB) has created a program called RAWMagic to get After Effects and Resolve-supported CinemaDNG files straight from the .RAW camera originals. More »

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About a year ago I was one of the first to call attention to an HDSLR plugin in development named 5DtoRGB. 5DtoRGB was designed to suck the utmost quality out of HDSLR files by transcoding them in 10 bits without using the ubiquitous, problematic, gamma-shifting Quicktime engine. Now beta releases of version 1.5 of the plugin are available for both Mac and Windows. Chris Marino takes an excellent video look at the new version: More »

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Months ago here on NoFilmSchool I tried to call attention to a little-known DSLR plugin in development known as 5DtoRGB. 5DtoRGB is a software plugin from Rarevision similar to Canon E1, MPEG Streamclip, and Magic Bullet Grinder in that it is designed to transcode your DSLR footage into something that’s eminently more editable. 5DtoRGB claims to offer the highest quality output of all of these options, but despite my posting about the plugin repeatedly, I could do no actual tests with it since my lowly laptop was restricted to 32-bit processing (5DtoRGB requires a 64-bit processor). Now that I’ve successfully built a 64-bit hackintosh, however (the how-to article is coming soon!), I was looking forward to putting the plugin to work. But I was beat to the punch by NoFilmSchool regular Robin Schmidt, who has done some great tests of his own, and as a result the word is out; now even 24 DP Rodney Charters is tweeting about 5DtoRGB. So now that we have our hands on the plugin, what’s the verdict? More »

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How are you transcoding your DSLR video these days? If you’re editing in Premiere Pro CS5, are you even transcoding at all? No matter your NLE, there are several options for transcoding, like Magic Bullet Grinder, the still-in-beta 5DtoRGB, and Canon’s own EOS Movie Plugin-E1 for Final Cut Pro. It looks like Canon’s going to be adding some interesting features to their free solution: More »

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I’ve covered a forthcoming DSLR post-production plugin known as 5DtoRGB before here (be sure to read the comments on that post for more info), but I would still call the plugin “little-known.” This is because the software — which transcodes DSLR footage to high-quality ProRes and DPX files — is still in beta. The previous version was restricted to processing a small number of clips, and only the first few seconds of each clip would be transcoded. However, Rarevision stopped by to let us know that the new version has no such restrictions. If they can deliver on the following featureset, I have a feeling the plugin will no longer be “little-known”: More »

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As part of today’s free Adobe workshop on HDSLR feature film workflows (I’ll update that post with a link to the archived presentation), one of the commenters brought to my attention a promising DSLR post-production plugin called 5DtoRGB.1 I’ve called DSLR color-correction on a Mac a clustercuss, not just because of the 4:2:0 color space, but because of Quicktime gamma inconsistencies (often related to YUV to RGB conversion). Rarevision’s 5DtoRGB plugin, currently in beta, just might be the solution to these problems. More »

  1. Sorry, whoever it was who commented about 5DtoRGB — I lost the chat thread when my Flash plugin crashed for the dozenth time. []