» Posts Tagged ‘amazonstudios’

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Amazon StorybuilderOne of the best ways to get your screenplay under control and nicely organized is to outline it, and there are literally endless methods, tools, and materials that can get it done. One that might interest you is the just-launched Amazon Storybuilder (currently still in beta). This cloud-based digital corkboard was developed by Amazon Studios to help users virtually plan out and tack up notecards for their scripts for free. Continue on to find out more. More »

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amazonstoryteller_logoScreenwriting by its very nature demands a visual writing style. The words on the page have to conjure up images in the reader’s mind if the script were turned into a film. Simultaneously, a screenplay must be economical with its language, using only the words necessary to tell the story. These two requirements, visual and economical, are two of the main reasons why storytelling in the screenplay format can be so difficult. Inevitably, production teams will need to visualize the screenplay, and that’s usually where storyboards come in (though plenty of us are inept at drawing). That’s why Amazon Studios has introduced a new tool to speed up the storyboarding process called Amazon Storyteller – and it’s “free,” but there’s a catch (or four or five). More »

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After launching in 2010, Amazon Studios has made its way to producing original content, albeit after a bit of trial and error. The 2012 changes, thousands of scripts, and your feedback have brought 14 of Amazon’s pilot episodes from script to screen, including 8 comedies (1 of which was submitted via Amazon Studios). Now that these shows are available on Amazon Instant Video, viewers are once again being asked to share their input by rating and reviewing them; a strategy that Amazon has embraced since the beginning. More »

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It’s clear that industry leaders in web-based media are taking original content very seriously — even Netflix, traditionally a home to separately created content, has rolled up its sleeves and proactively produced its own series. Now, another VOD/rental giant has decided to personally fund and cultivate original media — Amazon Studios has just announced its Instant Video component will be the home to six upcoming comedy pilots. The pilots will be helmed by everything from Emmy-winners and to up-and-comers — perhaps most importantly, they will be free to watch by anyone on Amazon Instant Video, and it will be viewer feedback that determines which of the series are greenlit and permitted to move forward. More »

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Many aspiring screenwriters want Amazon Studios to be the key to being discovered — a company with billions of dollars and an open door policy that wants to find content in new ways to make movies. Much has been written here and elsewhere about why the initial version of Amazon Studios was not a good deal for emerging screenwriters and independent filmmakers. So it was welcome news when Amazon Studios revised its terms, shortened its free option window to 45 days on public submissions, agreed to pay $10,000 for options beyond the 45 days for up to 18 months, agreed to get back to writers about their submissions within 45 days, and created private submissions for writers that did not want to share their screenplays with the community or provide Amazon Studios with a free 45-day option. Under these revised rules, however, screenwriter Chip Street has found a major catch. More »

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Have you got an idea for a “smart, character-driven” comedy series?  Or maybe an educationally themed children’s show?  Then Amazon Studios may be interested.  We’ve previously discussed Amazon Studios with relation to filmmaking, as well as their evolving screenwriting terms.  Now it appears they are opening a new development front on the series end.  With the potential to earn $10,000 if your pitch is accepted for the Development Slate (and more if the series actually goes into production) it may be worth a look — if you’re willing to live with the Amazon Studios model and their terms.  So what are they looking for?  And what should you be looking for? More »

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This story got swallowed up by all of the recent NAB coverage, but I think it’s very important. Much has been said here about Amazon Studios, but it quickly became clear that it was not designed to help independent filmmakers, especially those without any ties to the industry. By industry standards, the terms that Amazon Studios were giving to writers was almost laughable. For 18 months Amazon had a free option on your script. No protection at all. All of the other positives of the initiative go out the window when you lose your script for that long without any option to do anything else with it. But Amazon has changed their mind and has decided to give some fair terms to those who submit scripts. More »

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A year ago I asked, “Is Amazon Studios the Future of Film or is it a Bastardization of Crowdsourcing?” If you haven’t heard of it, Amazon Studios is a kind-of-strange crowdsourced movie studio, wherein Amazon.com is asking not only for script submissions but also test movies (which most often take the form of animatics) as part of their ongoing contest. To me the whole enterprise is offputting, as I tend to like movies that are sui generis as opposed to movies that are voted into existence because of a popularity contest, but hey — the film business is in need of new ideas and no one else is doing it quite like this. So, what’s happened over the last year? More »