» Posts Tagged ‘apps’

Description image

Tribeca 6 sec filmsSince it’s introduction a little over a year ago, the free mobile video app Vine has become a pretty significant player in smartphone filmmaking, inspiring the creation of hilarious 6-second videos, wise film industry musings, feature films, and even film contests. If you love Vine and missed the chance to put your micro-content skills to the test last year, Tribeca has once again sent out a call for entries for their 2nd Annual #6SECFILMS Vine Competition. Continue on to find out how to enter. More »

Description image

Vimeo EchoVideo technology is at an explosive crossroads as the mobile experience perpetuates our media landscape. With apps like Instagram and Vine, creators are constantly redefining how images are experienced. With the acquisition of Echograph, Vimeo changed the iOS app from its $2.99 market price to a free app, suggesting that they are most interested in exploring what draws people to a mobile experience. Hit the jump for more info and a juicy interview with Vimeo CEO Kerry Trainor: More »

Description image

Steve Jobs movieBack in March we talked about how a “flip book effect” became ”the world’s first Instagram film experience.” Given the advancements in video recording and sharing, not only by Instagram, but similar platforms, like Vine, my excitement seems cute now — like when I played Star Fox on Super Nintendo for the first time (“How are these graphics possible?”) And as always, new ways are being found to use Instagram, like in the case of Jobsthe Steve Jobs film starring Ashton Kutcher, being the first to use the app to upload a trailer. Are we about to see apps like Instagram and Vine become marketing and advertising platforms? More »

Description image

SMAPPThe fine folks over at stillmotion have been providing the film community with awesome educational resources for the past couple of years; everything from tutorials on how to light an interview to how to get better handheld footage. One of their coolest resources, however, is SMAPP, the “stillmotion App.” It combines all of stillmotion’s killer tutorials with a set of story-driven interactive tools, which use input based on how you want your shot to look and feel in order to provide technical suggestions on how to achieve it. Now, a new version of SMAPP is available that adds new functionality to many of their old tools as well as some extremely helpful new ones. More »

Description image

Ryan Gosling Wont Eat His CerealVine, the Twitter-owned iOS app that lets you take, upload, and now embed 6 seconds of video, has been making the rounds since it was released back in January of this year. Tribeca held a contest for filmmakers to make movies with Vine, but similar to Twitter itself when it began, we haven’t quite figured out its true purpose. That is, until now. Ryan McHenry, who directed a BAFTA-winning short film called Zombie Musical, has created something of true genius with the app. Behold, Ryan Gosling Won’t Eat Cereal, the very reason Vine, and possibly the internet, was created: More »

Description image

Too often have I experienced the doubled-edged nature of the internet: it’s a great tool, but also a great distraction. We all need to buckle down sometimes and get to work, and the insta-grat (yes) of the internet can be crippling. In comes SelfControl, a free and open-source application that blocks your own access to chosen websites for a designated amount of time. Hit the jump for the details. More »

Description image

We’ve seen a few apps capable of controlling different programs on your computer with an iPad. A recent app that caught our eye, ProCutX, is capable of controlling Final Cut Pro X with your iPad, and replacing many of the functions normally done with a keyboard. For a limited time (possible only a few more hours), the full app, which is normally around $25, is now free on iTunes. Click through for a video walk-through of ProCutX. More »

Description image

The iPhone and app store is constantly evolving into an important tool for independent filmmakers. From camera manuals, to slates, to light meters, the versatility and ease of the device has impacted just about every filmmaker I know — and it’s here to stay. There are countless iPhone apps out there that can make life on location easier, all without breaking the bank. Click through to check out three that I use regularly. More »

Description image

A few months ago Twitter launched a new iOS app called Vine that is aiming to take a piece of the video sharing pie. Similar to the company’s 140 character limit, Vine is a video sharing service limited to videos that are no more than 6 seconds in length. There have been plenty of interesting applications for the service, and Tribeca is trying to take advantage of the storytelling possibilities by starting a contest that challenges you to come up with a short film in 6 seconds that has a beginning, middle, and end. Think you’re up for it? Read on for more details. More »

Description image

The keyboard can certainly be a powerful and efficient control surface for non-linear editing, especially with the mastery of hot-keys and short-cuts. Despite this, some editors desire a more visually intuitive way of interfacing with their NLE. There are those that prefer specialized color-coded editing keyboards or keyboard covers, while others swear by their tactile controllers. Those can go for around $80, but what about using an infinitely configurable iPad to take the place of one of these consoles? We’ve already seen one iOS app capable of controlling a wide range of video software, but with a new iPad app called ProCutX, Apple editors have yet another way to turn their tablet into a Final Cut Pro X console. Check out some images and details below. More »

Description image

Every once in a while I am reminded that I live in an age with an eerie yet delightful attribute: I can ask why isn’t there a device or piece of software that does a certain thing, and then usually within 6 months the thing I wanted becomes a reality. Case in point: I was wondering how a friend of mine went about keeping track of a bunch of major film festival deadlines. The most obvious answer was that he probably spends time on Withoutabox and enters in deadlines into some calendar software. Still, I couldn’t help but ask myself “why isn’t there an all-in-one app that helps filmmakers keep track of film festivals?” As if on cue, a few days later iFilmfest popped up on my digital radar. More »

Description image

Twitter is “the internet’s SMS.” Instagram is the Twitter of pictures. Some app somewhere is prophesied to be “the Instagram of Video.” I’ve used epic words for social media’s ‘cinemaminigram’ before, because it’s apparently that big of a deal — or it may just be YouTube. Then again, if Instagram is Twitter for photos, but Facebook nabbed Instagram — all while ‘Instagram for Video’ is still out there — what’s a Twitter to do? The next best thing, or better: Twitter has just dropped Vine for iOS. It’s a lot like Instagram, but for 6 second looping videos. Given that Twitter already is, well, the Instagram of words, this app could be the ‘IoV.’ Is this saga at the beginning of its end? More »

Description image

Talk about your digital leatherman: The number of ridiculously handy — and practical, and portable, all in one — apps for filmmaking on mobile devices is probably one of the greatest tech-vantages we’ve got going for us these days second to low-cost high-res acquisition. Uses range from lighting plot diagramming and shooting scheduling all the way to Canon DSLR control via Android and RED control via iOS — there’s an app for all that, and more. Now, thanks to Adam Wilt of Pro Video Coalition (and a lot of other great stuff), your iPhone is now more of an asset on set than ever before — and that’s because his new $5 app Cine Meter turns your iOS device into a light meter, waveform monitor and false-color display. More »

Description image

Is it possible we’re losing something through the non-destructive way in which we decide the final look of our shots? The answer, quaintly enough, is absolutely yes — but what, exactly? Simplicity. True finesse in color timing is something Dale Grahn (Saving Private Ryan, Gladiator, Munich, Apocalypse Now: Redux) knows a lot about, and in a true chemical timing sense — which says a lot about the power of bold and minimal control over imagery. Lucky for any of us looking to learn from the experience, Mr. Grahn is asking you to match his own color grades by way of a new iPad app — and in the process interact with the very essentials of color grading. More »

Description image

Though I understand where these things come from, calling something like Lomography “the analog Instagram” is like calling Kodak’s new Super 8 stock “the chemical MiniDV,” or even better, “the new digital from back before digital” — for the sake of modern analog (dear lord I just said that) we’re getting our chicken-and-egg orders mixed up. That said, we’ve seen some pretty interesting blends of the old and the new… and then back to the old again. There was The Impossible Project’s Impossible Instant Lab, which made Polaroids of cell phone stills — which we also called “the Real Instagram,” though again, I understand why. Thanks to (both a hobby and) a company called Lomography, the opposite chicken-egg process is possible — with some help, your smartphone is now also a digital scanner of film negatives. Read: Instant scanning, insta… sharing. More »

Description image

YouTube is doing a lot to make itself a media service platform that rivals the traditional television you’re used to. Original channels are getting a major push, creators are being given some big perks as incentive, and shooting/uploading elegance now trumps native video-sharing options on rival mobile devices. There’s still plenty of things that need to be ironed out before all of us may seriously consider YouTube as a hub for our own content — but Google is still looking toward the future and forging ahead. The ability to watch YouTube on your home TV set is already proliferating, but now, Google has announced an app update that allows you to control browsing and viewing directly with your Android phone or tablet. More »

Description image

I wasn’t really expecting to have to refer to the theoretical ‘Instagram of Video’ for another while — major choices for mobile users are already in place and ‘in the running’ for such a title, and it could be a while before everyone in the discussion unanimously declares one app the victor (if ever). The Verge (seemingly in a nod to comments) acknowledged YouTube as the elephant in the room for these apps, because even on iOS where the YouTube app is read-only (well, watch-only — no uploads), the service is the megalith for easily-socialized video. A complete YouTube experience is already native on Android (again, YouTube is Google is Android), perhaps to the chagrin of recent Android-joiner Viddy. A new development may totally shift the dynamics of this interplay, however: Google just yesterday released YouTube Capture for iOS. More »

Description image

Where is the supposed ‘Instagram of Video?’ Is it even possible for a motion-based media/social service to be as lightweight, sharable, and just plain easy as Instagram makes stills? The jury is still out, the verdict on which of the contenders will stick — if any at all — is still to be determined. We covered a bit on some of the startups stepping into the ring already, and since then, some other relevant material has surfaced. In one corner, heavyweight Viddy (one of the favorite bets) has just released an Android version of its service for many smartphones, while in the other, small independent startup Lumify wants to make “filmmaking for everyone” and attempts to answer “Why our mobile videos suck.” More »

Description image

There’s no doubt that modern mobile technology has the capacity to streamline or benefit many aspects of filmmaking. Whether it’s the micro-video art emerging in social media, script supervision capabilities, lighting-fast previsualization softwares, or the surprisingly high-resolution video some phones and tablets can shoot (given what they are), there’s something to be said for their place in the industry. For goodness sake, modern smartphones are better at giving directions than my GPS navigator and shoot higher quality video than my first camcorder. With all that said, though, how far can things like the Apple iPhone or an Android tablet be taken down-and-dirty in the trenches of shooting? More »

Description image

Vimeo has recently announced a major update to its iPhone App, adding some elegance with a new tab-based design and features like background-uploading and native Facebook/Twitter video sharing. It also retains some of the basic browsing and managing capabilities that previous generations provided. Judging by some of the feedback the Vimeo staff is publicly receiving, though, the app may have some ways to go before it’s optimally useful for busy and on-the-go users. More »