» Posts Tagged ‘apps’

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There’s no doubt that modern mobile technology has the capacity to streamline or benefit many aspects of filmmaking. Whether it’s the micro-video art emerging in social media, script supervision capabilities, lighting-fast previsualization softwares, or the surprisingly high-resolution video some phones and tablets can shoot (given what they are), there’s something to be said for their place in the industry. For goodness sake, modern smartphones are better at giving directions than my GPS navigator and shoot higher quality video than my first camcorder. With all that said, though, how far can things like the Apple iPhone or an Android tablet be taken down-and-dirty in the trenches of shooting? More »

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Vimeo has recently announced a major update to its iPhone App, adding some elegance with a new tab-based design and features like background-uploading and native Facebook/Twitter video sharing. It also retains some of the basic browsing and managing capabilities that previous generations provided. Judging by some of the feedback the Vimeo staff is publicly receiving, though, the app may have some ways to go before it’s optimally useful for busy and on-the-go users. More »

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Instagram has proven to be a social media force to be reckoned with, and none of the major players already entrenched (or looking to break into) that world are treating it lightly. In fact, several are attempting to reinterpret its model in some fashion or another for a more video-based type of platform. There are already a few startups offering Instagram-type creation and integrated sharing, though it’s unclear what staying power or growth any of them will have in the long run. If one does start growing roots, an ‘Instagram for video’ could become another prime facet of the increasingly cross-pollinated social media ecosystem. But what, if anything, does this all mean for we who deal in pretty moving pictures as our profession? More »

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Thoughtful, artistic lighting is necessary to set your film apart from the competition. Some great planning and pre-production on lighting design can make a $5,000 short film sell a $50,000 look. And the good news is there are many tools that can help you achieve your intended look on an indie budget, from a good book lighting setup to a bit of well-managed haze. As a new iPad owner, I recently stumbled upon Sylights, an app geared at photographers that (like many things DSLR) also has great digital filmmaking applications. Hit the jump for some screen caps and a brief rundown of this handy FREE app/website: More »

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If you’ve ever worked in linear tape-to-tape editing, there’s a good chance you’ve dealt with an edit controller device that has jog or shuttle wheels. With everything being software based now, many have simply reassigned to a keyboard the tasks that used to be associated with a console. Well, short of buying an expensive console to interface with your NLE or remembering dozens of keyboard shortcuts, what’s a video editor to do? That’s where Jeff Chow’s CTRL+Console iOS app comes in. Click through to check out the Kickstarter video. More »

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There are many great ways to connect to other filmmakers today. We have sites like Production Hub, Mandy.com, and even Craigslist that are fantastic for crewing up and getting on crews. However, when I’m playing “closer to the chest”, I find myself sourcing locally nowadays on Facebook. I like to see who knows who of closer friends, and I prefer direct connections to general callouts. This merger of production resources and social networking is the theme behind Stage 32, a 70,000+ member network for film, television, and theatre creatives. More »

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Thanks to Hollywood Camera Work’s new app Shot Designer, you can now design and block camera coverage of your scene almost as fast as you can think it — even on your mobile device. An intuitive interface allows precise control for plotting (and animating) all the essential aspects of shooting your scene in a classic top-down diagram style. A limited (single-scene-at-a-time) release is available for free, and the $20 Pro version has some key perks too. Read on for the intro video and a more detailed list of Shot Designer’s features. More »

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There’s a lot in the way of Micro 4/3 news that’s been coming down the pike, mainly due to the upcoming release of the Panasonic GH3 and the passive MFT version of the Blackmagic Cinema Camera coming at the end of the year. On the GH3 side of things, there’s a hands on video of the GH3 smartphone app, new test videos, an official release date, and the first rumblings from the hacker community. There’s also a test video of SLR Magic’s new 35mm T0.95 and T1.4 lenses, as well as rumors of an active Micro 4/3 mount Blackmagic Cinema Camera: More »

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RED’s new Meizler Module was recently introduced, and it does almost everything you think a module should be able to do. It’s wireless functionality and proxy capabilities are the main selling point, but RED is also developing their own app that allows control of a RED EPIC or SCARLET through an iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. Here is another video from Sean Ruggeri at RED giving a brief overview of the Meizler Module as well as the new REDsync app: More »

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So you just got hired onto a production as an AC or a Camera Operator, and you know that you have the knowledge, talent, and skill to produce some beautiful images. There’s just one problem: You’ve never laid a hand on the camera that’s being used in the production. It’s probably not going to look too good if you have to spend a lot of time fiddling around in the menus to find the settings you’re looking for, but not to worry. Canon just released a camera simulator for the C300, and there are also simulators available for the Arri Alexa, and the Sony F65: More »

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Video takes up a lot of hard drive space. HD video more so than SD, 4K more than HD… and since the flooding in Thailand, hard drive prices have spiked precipitously. So there’s always room in an editor’s toolkit for an app to analyze drive space and zero in on the largest directories to delete or move. Similar to my approach to tracking time, freeing up space is all about focusing on what’s important: in this case, the largest files. DaisyDisk is a paid Mac app that I find myself using frequently; here’s a review from NextUpMac (and a free alternative). More »

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Pomfort makes a number of interesting Mac tools for DSLR and indie filmmakers. I went to their site to check out DSLR Log2Video Plugin, a $29 plugin for working with DSLR footage shot with Canon’s CineStyle picture profile. The plugin is a part of the $129 Silverstack LT H.264, which I found myself evaluating as a tool for offloading and backing up DSLR-originated projects. Silverstack LT is, in turn, the limited version of the $825 data wrangling workflow aid Silverstack SET, which adds advanced features and support for the ARRI ALEXA and RED cameras. Then I found myself checking out their MamboFrame, which turns an iPad into real, physical clapper sticks — it’s not just an app: More »

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In-the-cloud screenwriting app Adobe Story is free until April 12th, 2012. I got a chance to use it recently (instead of my normal app — and industry standard — Final Draft) because I was in search of a two-column, A/V writing layout and I find Celtx’s A/V mode disappointing. In the process I found out Story now has an iPhone app that’s also free. Unlike the mobile version of Celtx, Story doesn’t let you edit the screenplay through iOS, but it does let you read scripts, add comments, read notes from others, and sync everything to the cloud. Adobe’s making a play to offer a complete script-to-screen solution, and Story is a central piece. Here’s the desktop version in action: More »

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DSLR Filmmaker Toolkit is a new app for iOS devices that combines a number of handy tools for, you guessed it, DSLR filmmakers. Current features include an electronic slate, shot log, depth-of-field calculator, level (for dolly/slider shots), daylight calculator, director’s viewfinder and more. It’s priced at $7.99 and available now through iTunes. I can’t test it myself as I’m on Android, but here’s a look at the app in action: More »

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Some have pointed out that many of Final Cut Pro X’s much-lauded new features are not really that “new.” This backlash seems to happen with every Apple product, perhaps out of response to the rapturous reception with which Apple fanboys greet the superlative-laced presentations. In the case of FCP X, the criticism is that FCP X’s list of new features (seen on video) have been around for a while in other editing applications (notably Premiere and Vegas). But a list of features does not an editing program make. It’s not what features you include in a piece of software, it’s how you design them. Read on for some thoughts on intuitive design and a few full resolution screenshots of the new Final Cut Pro X. More »

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Vimeo has had HTML5-enabled video for quite some time, which means all of their videos are viewable on iOS devices. But now they’ve released the official Vimeo iPhone app, which includes far more functionality than you’d expect from a first version. In fact, it looks as if the Vimeo app — which is free — could give the iOS version of iMovie a run for its money (which, it’s worth noting, is priced very affordably at $4.99). Here’s a look at the Vimeo application in action: More »

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I’m sure you’re aware that the music/film/interactive superfest SXSW is currently underway in Austin, Texas. Given this is a film-specific site, you’d expect me to cover the film festival portion of the festival, right? Well, it’s being well-covered by those who are actually in attendance. But I did want to share something related to the interactive side of the fest: a bundle of applications and software tools for startups and web entrepenuers. I get a fair number of questions from readers about monetizing a web site, so I figured this would be of interest to some of you: More »

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Scenechronize is a browser-based production tool that breaks down scripts, prints sides, helps with scheduling, and does a number of other production tasks that I don’t have experience with myself. It looks similar to Movie Magic Budgeting, except Scenechronize is a web-based, and instead of a flat price of $500 it’s modular and is priced anywhere from free to $2,800. In the works since 2006, the program’s creators claim Warner Bros. and Columbia Pictures are already using it. An example screen: More »

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Many of us watch movies via Netflix, Hulu, and other services instead of ever waiting for a disc to spin up. And when’s the last time anyone went to a Blockbuster? With DVD winding down, Apple has famously sat out Blu-ray, with Steve Jobs calling the format a “bag of hurt.” With iTunes and Apple TV, Apple has worked towards eliminating the CD and DVD, respectively. Will the launch of today’s Mac App Store do the same for software on disc? More »

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blueSLR is a new application/dongle combination that allows you to control a DSLR using your mobile device. You plug a Bluetooth dongle into your Nikon DSLR (support for Canon is “coming soon”), pair it with your iOS device, and now you’ve got a remote control for your DSLR. The dongle also allows you to geotag your shots, as it adds location data. More »