» Posts Tagged ‘archiving’

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In 2010 I directed a 30 minute short indie film. My crew and I made use of a domain-level install of Google Docs to manage our production documents from the convenience of the cloud. It was fantastic to have everything all in one place, and we loved that it was on another login separate from our personal emails. However, there were scary hiccups, including strange non-forwarding emails, un-downloadable attachments, and login issues. As wonderful as Google is, we felt Docs left something to be desired. Considering this experience, I’m very excited to share with you another platform that offers that same closed garden approach, with added security and functionality, tailored specifically to filmmakers. It’s called Scenios, and the well-made welcome video is available after the link: More »

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Most of us who are shooting on SD cards, CF cards, or some form of solid-state memory enjoy a number of benefits that being in a digital workflow provides. Some of the biggest Pros involve sheer convenience factors like the ease of making digital copies, and the ease of storage or backup. Some of the biggest Cons, however, involve the cost of storing those large amounts of data, the logistics, and the fact that hard drive media is a bit more fragile than tape-based backup. If you’re looking for a piece of mind solution, and download speed isn’t an issue, Amazon Glacier can provide what you need for an affordable cost. Hit the jump for more details, and an incredibly intricate graphic from yours truly: More »

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Fascinating story over at Creative Cow about the Library of Congress’s efforts to preserve motion pictures, from today’s digitally-shot features to films printed on paper in 1890. According to homie at the Library of Congress (that’s probably the first time someone at the Library of Congress has been called “homie”), if stored at 25 degrees Fahrenheit and 30% relative humidity, 35mm motion picture film will last for 2,000 years! Which poses some interested questions when compared to digital archiving. More »