» Posts Tagged ‘aspectratio’

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Xavier Dolan MommyWhile the traditional aspect ratio for HD video is 1.78/16:9 (the aspect ratio of your HDTV), most films projected in theaters are in a 1.85 or 2.39 aspect ratio. This hasn’t always been the case as your old 4:3 TV can attest to, and in recent years some filmmakers have explored using the older 1.33 aspect ratio for their films. But what about a perfectly square 1:1 ratio? That’s what Xavier Dolan and André Turpin decided to use for their new film Mommy, which recently screened at the Cannes Film Festival. More »

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cinemascopeWe’ve talked at length about aspect ratios before, offering not only their history, but the importance and relevance of each one’s aesthetics in filmmaking today. But, another great resource for learning about aspect ratios, or anything film related for that matter, is respected film theorist and historian David Bordwell. His books have been a staple in film schools for a long time, and now he offers an almost hour-long lecture on the history of CinemaScope and how technology affects filmmaking. More »

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Emma Moody 16x9
We’ve been talking a lot about aspect ratios lately. Now that everyone has a basic understanding of what aspect ratios are, where they come from, and how to apply them to your own digital footage, you’re likely asking yourselves, “What’s the big deal with all of this aspect ratio talk?” Well, dear readers, the big deal is this; aspect ratios, and how you choose to frame your subjects within them, are one of the most subtle, yet highly effective, ways to cinematically convey various elements of your story to the audience. What do I mean by that? Hit the jump to find out. More »

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All Aspect RatiosNo matter what you’re shooting, be it Super 16, 35, HD, or iPhone videos for YouTube, you’re going to run into the question of aspect ratio. Aspect Ratio, defined as: “the proportional relationship between [an image's] width and its height,” determines not only the look, but frequently the feel and mood of a piece, too. At some point, every production is going to have to pick one, and at Vashi Visuals, you can not only see every aspect ratio used in the history of cinema, but also pick up a free template package for use in your own projects. More »

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Screen shot 2013-06-27 at 1.08.50 PMHow often do we think about aspect ratios? Better yet, how often do we think about where all of our aspect ratios came from and the storied cinematic histories from which they were born? It’s an interesting question, not only for the sake of being more informed about the technical history of cinema, but also for having a better understanding of the implications of various aspect ratios on your film’s aesthetic and story. Hit the jump for an extensive video lesson on the history of the aspect ratio. More »

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The aspect ratio is one of the fundamentals determining your compositions. Even though we live in a time where displaying any aspect ratio is incredibly easy, films are still being shown incorrectly in many mediums in an attempt to make them fill the entire screen (even if that’s not the intention of the filmmaker). Interestingly enough, cinema history has actually been plagued by these kinds of issues related to aspect ratio. A visual essay by Criterion Collection illustrates how the intended aspect ratio of On The Waterfront is still in question to this day, and we also get a demonstration of the impressive restoration to Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much from a heavily warped and damaged print. More »

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Steven Soderbergh called attention to this issue a few months back, but the DGA’s website was in a state of disrepair and his opinion piece couldn’t be properly linked. Also, I don’t have cable, so I didn’t pick up on the issue first hand — that is, until I moved out of my apartment September 1st and, by relying on the kindness of others and couch surfing, began watching movies on cable in wonderful high definition. There’s been just one problem: the movies are crapped. Sorry, I mean cropped. More »