» Posts Tagged ‘bafta’

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BAFTAHeroes are fallible. Even superheroes must have their faults and weaknesses, and the screenwriters behind some of the most memorable portrayals of comic book heroes and real life heroes in recent years are certainly far from perfect. Yet, two long-time screenwriters, David S. Goyer and Susannah Grant, have both battled failures as writers to give us memorable scripts with complex heroes, whether pulled from comic books or ripped from the headlines. Thanks to the BAFTA Screenwriter Lecture series, both Goyer and Grant share their experiences as screenwriters with the rest of us so we can learn how to overcome our own obstacles to create memorable film heroes. More »

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Boy AGetting your start in cinematography may feel like getting dropped in the middle of nowhere without a compass, which is why advice from those who have found their way out is so invaluable. DP Rob Hardy, who has worked on films like Boy A and Red Riding: In the year of Our Lord 1974 offers some great advice, as well as some valuable words of encouragement, to beginning cinematographers in this BAFTA video. Continue on to check it out.

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Paul GreengrassAt first glance, this BAFTA lecture from Captain Phillips director, Paul Greengrass on iconic director David Lean, might seem like a simple nod to an individual career — a legendary one, but individual nonetheless. However, as Greengrass’ speech goes on, it becomes a more of a soliloquy about the life of a director —  the choices that ones has to make in order to be and continue to be one. It’s really a beautiful and powerful lecture with plenty of helpful information about the craft of filmmaking (and David Lean, too!), so continue on to check it out. More »

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Alfonso Cuaron BAFTABAFTA LA recently sat down with director Alfonso Cuarón for their Behind Closed Doors series, in which he answered questions surrounding everything from his childhood love of classic cinema to the motivation behind the choices he made on Gravity. It’s a rare look into not only an Academy Award-winning director’s life, but into a career that is marked with great boldness, mastery — and an expulsion from film school. Listen to Cuarón  share about his childhood discovery of films, turbulent years in film school, and his current approach to filmmaking after the jump. More »

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Lol CrawleyCinematographer Lol Crawley, who has shot such films as Ballast, which won for Best Cinematography at Sundance in 2008, and last year’s Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, has a true knack for capturing painfully personal and intimate images. He took some time to share some cinematography advice back in 2012 for his BAFTA Cinematography Masterclass in Bristol, and Anna Hoghton highlights and paraphrases the key ideas he shared, including how to light and finding your voice as a DP. (And we’ve taken a few of our favorites to share with you!) More »

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ScreenwritingScreenwriting, as most of us know, isn’t just about sitting down at your computer and slapping your fingers across the keyboard until you have a story with a beginning, middle, and end. It takes preparation, study, hard work, and lots and lots of rewriting to put one together, and offering insight into this tempestuous process through BAFTA’s web series, How I Write, a collection of screenwriters talk about their experience with preparing, writing, and rewriting screenplays. More »

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Tony Gilroy BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture 5 Simple Rules for Writing an Original ScreenplayNarrative film is certainly a collaborative medium, but almost always it begins with a writer putting words on a page. The blank page, unfortunately, isn’t the most collaborative partner. So, how do you write an original screenplay? Every writer has his or her own methods, and I think we can learn a great deal from the methods of a successful screenwriter. A few days ago, writer/director Tony Gilroy tackled this most basic question of how to write an original screenplay in his talk at the BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture series, which essentially boils down to five simple rules. More »

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Ron HowardRon Howard has been a presence in Hollywood, either as an actor or director, for decades. As a child actor, he was beloved as the character Opie Taylor on The Andy Griffith Show and Richie Cunningham on Happy Days. As a Hollywood director, Howard has worked in almost every genre, from family films like Parenthood to thrillers like Ransom or his newest, Rush. Howard sat down to give a few thoughts on filmmaking to BAFTA (The British Academy of Film and Television Arts), and when as consummate a filmmaker as Howard speaks, we would be wise to listen. Click below to hear Howard’s thoughts on acting, editing and the role of a director! More »

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Comedy Writing MasterclassHow do you teach comedy? Comedy writers Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong, creators of the award-winning British sitcoms Peep Show and Fresh Meat, attempt to do so, or at the very least offer some tips on how to make your comedy better in this BAFTA masterclass. The two sat down to talk about breaking into the industry, how to write funny characters and scenes, and even attempt to answer the age-old question of why we laugh. More »

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JJ Abrams on FilmmakingJ.J. Abrams made a name for himself in television, but he’s become been one of the biggest film directors in Hollywood thanks to giant movies like Mission: Impossible III and the Star Trek reboot. Recently he sat down with BAFTA Guru to talk about his career, what his father told him before going to college, and his advice for aspiring filmmakers. Click through to check it out. More »

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As aspiring screenwriters, we tend to look for tips, tricks, or shortcuts to improve our screenwriting, but inevitably we have to do the hard work of writing the story. Moreover, we want our unique voices to pop off the page, engaging and surprising our readers, and someone else’s rules for screenwriting (beyond the basics of story structure and screenplay format) may mute our unique voices. So, with this in mind, screenwriter Scott Frank (Out of Sight, Minority Report, The Lookout) shared his rules for screenwriting during his recent BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture. Note: these rules only pertain to Scott Frank, not to you. More »

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Many screenwriters don’t take the most direct path to their eventual position of writing for the screen. Some may strive to become directors, but realize they can’t find the right material to shoot, so they have to write it themselves. Others may write for different media and get sucked into this strange economical style of storytelling in the screenplay format. And others still may have pursued a career in acting, run up against too many obstacles to launch their careers, and found themselves writing content for the screen instead of acting it out on the screen. Hailing from this latter category, British screenwriter Julian Fellowes (Academy Award winner for Gosford Park, Downton Abbey writer/creator) practically stumbled into the role of screenwriter when his acting career didn’t take off. In his recent British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Screenwriting Lecture, he tells the tale of how he started his screenwriting career and how he found “overnight success” on his road to winning the Oscar for writing Gosford Park, directed by Robert Altman. More »

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As filmmakers, we recognize that this medium requires a collaborative process, and the writer-producer-director relationship drives this process forward. The relationship that connects the creative triumvirate, however, can easily degenerate from a collaboration to an all-out tug-of-war. Perhaps the best way to support the writer-producer-director relationship is for each party to take the time to understand the needs and desires of the other parties involved. Thanks to the BAFTA New Filmmakers’ Market, producer Kate Ogborn (The Deep Blue Sea, Red Riding trilogy), screenwriter Rupert Walters (Restoration, MI-5 television series), and director Brian Gilbert (Wilde) share what they believe to be some of the best (and some of the worst) practices to manage the writer-producer-director relationship in podcast below: More »

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For reasons much debated yet still unknown, women are severely underrepresented among screenwriters. The Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting recently reported that out of 7,197 entrants this year, only 2,033 were women (that’s only 28% for you percentage people). Perhaps we need to see more working female screenwriters who in turn can illustrate a path for women who write to pursue a career in screenwriting. On that note, screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna (The Devil Wears Prada, We Bought a Zoo) not only provides a great example of a working female screenwriter, but also how to write believable workplaces in her BAFTA screenwriting lecture. More »

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Every writer has his or her own way of working, but for most, writing will inevitably involve sitting in front of a computer, a typewriter or a pad of paper in solitude. For some of us, this solitude becomes too much of a habit, and the voices inside our heads bounce around like an echo chamber, only slight variations of ourselves. To tackle a story about characters outside of our daily lives and comfort zones, we need to hear their voices, see their cultures, feel their stories. Screenwriter and Ken Loach collaborator Paul Laverty (My Name is Joe, The Wind That Shakes the Barley) has made a career of living among his characters from various countries and socioeconomic backgrounds, and he shares his experiences in a video interview as part of the BAFTA Screenwriter Lecture series. More »

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Aspiring screenwriters are always looking for that pathway to success, the one that will open the doors to getting their scripts turned into films. The reality is there is no single pathway to success. Every writer has to forge a new trail. Nevertheless, we seem compelled to look to successful screenwriters to see if we can mimic at least part of their journey. To help us on this quest, screenwriter John Logan (Hugo, The Aviator, Gladiator, Any Given Sunday) has provided some helpful tips in his BAFTA lecture podcast. More »

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In terms of exploring subjectivity and how the mind works, Charlie Kaufman is perhaps today’s preeminent screenwriter. Either that, or he’s an expert in solipsism and desperate attempts to avoid it, which inevitably leads to becoming solipsistic and even more desperate attempts to avoid it. Either way, Charlie Kaufman is truly — truly — an original screenwriter, and one of my personal favorites. Kaufman’s perspective on screenwriting is obviously unique, and the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (better known as BAFTA) has posted a podcast of Kaufman giving a speech on what he thinks screenwriting really is. You can listen to the entire podcast here: More »