» Posts Tagged ‘bullettime’

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52 gopro bullet time rigWe’ve seen the bullet time effect achieved through many methods. In terms of low-end tech and budget, you’ve got the inventive ceiling fan/GoPro technique, and on the high-end you’ve got the innovative 12 Teledyne DALSA Falcon2 multi-viewpoint technique. However, somewhere in the middle lies the action camera array approach, and Devin Graham and his team took 52 of GoPros, built a specialized circular rig, and filmed dogs running through it with some pretty cool results. Check out the behind the scenes video as well as the finished product after the jump. More »

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Bullet Time freeDWe’ve been following the recent developments of bullet time rigs pretty closely, especially the one created by Japanese broadcasting company NHK. Their rig consisted of just 8 multi-viewpoint remote-controlled cameras, but the folks over at Replay Technologies has developed a 12 4K Teledyne DALSA Falcon2 CMOS camera setup. They’re calling it “freeD” and you’ll be able to watch the NFL from multiple new perspectives in little over a month. To see it in action and find out how it works, hit the jump: More »

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Jeremiah Warren bullet time rigThere aren’t many things cooler than a really well-done bullet time sequence, which is probably why we like to cover it so often. If you’ve seen our other bullet time posts, both on the technological advances of multi-viewpoint camera setups and DIY rigs, then you might’ve been bummed out that the technology is either unavailable, too expensive, or too time-consuming. But, here’s some good news. Though currently you can’t make a legit bullet time rig without using lots of cameras, setup, and time, you can get something close to it by using a 2×4, screws, a GoPro, and a ceiling fan — and the result will look great for your low-budget projects. Hit the jump to see how. More »

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NHK Bullet Time camera systemAmazing. It would look — amazing. And this isn’t something I thought up in a wonderful wonderful dream I had. (If it was, it would’ve been Muggsy Bogues dunking on Hakeem Olajuwon and then high-fiving David Robinson before dismounting off of the backboard in a fiery double gainer.) This is what we could see every time we turn on a game if broadcasters use a bullet time camera system developed by Japanese broadcasting company NHK. The multi-viewpoint remote-controlled camera setup could take instant replays in sports to a whole new — very exciting level. More »

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We recently featured several practical but effective techniques for creating the (by now) famous Matrix-esque ‘bullet-time’ effect — accomplished, in more than one case, by using an evenly spaced array of GoPros and some post-processing elbow grease. Clearly, the availability and portability of such cameras is catching on beyond conventional ‘action cam’ uses, and inspiring creatives of nearly any budget to create shots only A-budget Hollywood productions used to be able to pull off. GoPros make sense for such arrays, because they are forgivingly frameable (and decently affordable as far as rentals go). Now, another project has demonstrated what’s possible with these simple but adaptable cameras — in this case, built into a rig that can also be handheld. More »

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When you hear the term “bullet time,” you probably can’t help but think of The Matrix. And if you’ve taken a gander at the behind the scenes footage from that film or similar productions, then you know that’s it’s an effect usually done in large warehouse studios, with a multitude of cameras on a huge rig, and run by a sizable crew, which all adds up to being quite expensive. Even renting a bullet time rig will more than likely be cost prohibitive, but with some elbow grease you can put together your own portable rig at a more indie friendly price: More »

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The famous bullet time effect from The Matrix got pretty staid after it was used in (seemingly) hundreds of commercials in the years that followed. But I found my interest piqued by this spot for Rip Curl — not only because it’s a surfing commercial and it’s getting colder in NYC, so I find myself wishing for warmer climes — but also because you can’t quite figure out while you’re watching it just how they got 52 Canon DSLRs safely positioned over the water. What’s their secret? More »