» Posts Tagged ‘c300’

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The camera that seemingly appeared out of nowhere at the end of last month, the Canon C100, looks like it has its first real footage online. While we don’t have an official price yet from the largest American reseller, B&H, it’s looking like the final price may be somewhere between $6,000 and $8,000. In typical Canon style, though, the video is something we’ve got to watch extremely compressed through an online streaming service (in this case Vimeo). The creator of the video, Sebastien Devaud, had a talk with Sebastian over at cinema5D at this year’s IBC about the camera and shooting the video for Canon. There is also a behind-the-scenes of the video that is embedded below. More »

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We all knew it was coming at some point — a Canon EOS Cinema camera under $10,000. Today Canon announced the C100, the cheaper sibling of the C300 (a lot cheaper at half the price). While it looks like this camera should be able to go head to head with the FS700 (considering the price), it’s actually an FS100 for $3,000 more and with a less compatible mount. Either way it’s just another option for filmmakers to consider when choosing their next camera. Check out the specs and analysis below. More »

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So you just got hired onto a production as an AC or a Camera Operator, and you know that you have the knowledge, talent, and skill to produce some beautiful images. There’s just one problem: You’ve never laid a hand on the camera that’s being used in the production. It’s probably not going to look too good if you have to spend a lot of time fiddling around in the menus to find the settings you’re looking for, but not to worry. Canon just released a camera simulator for the C300, and there are also simulators available for the Arri Alexa, and the Sony F65: More »

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We’ve already shown off one of the cheaper wireless follow focus systems from JAG35. Now Redrock Micro has partially redesigned their microRemote Wireless Follow Focus system by developing their own motor and creating a new controller (in addition to the iPhone controller). They’ve also got a rig system called the ultraCage that is designed to be form-fitting to cameras like the Canon C300 or the Canon 5D Mark II and 5D Mark III. I had a chance to talk with Brian Valente and Loren Simons at the Redrock NAB booth, and you can see that video embedded below. More »

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We all know that LEDs are the next big movement in lighting technology — or are they? Zacuto is introducing a one-of-a-kind light panel that uses a patented micro-plasma technology not unlike what is found in a plasma television — which has phosphors that glow when energy is introduced. Of course, it’s a bit more complicated than that, but the bottom line is that this panel is softer, and has a greater lumen rating than any other 1-foot-by-1-foot panel on the market today. In the embedded video below, Steve Weiss from Zacuto gives us an introduction of the panel, as well as a walk-through of their Recoil rig, Tornado Follow Focus, and FS100 rig. More »

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A $15,000 DSLR? Now we’ve seen it all. No, wait — we haven’t seen it all, as Canon is just getting started with their Cinema EOS line. And they’re also just getting started with 4K acquisition: their latest addition is to be the Canon C500 (pictured), which is essentially a 4K version of the C300. More »

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The Canon C300 is quite the camera, and by all accounts it’s a high-end professional camera (and we should refer to it as such since it’s the most expensive camera Canon makes). But something strange is going on that could affect your footage in a very real and disastrous way as compared to other cameras. Paul Antico at NextWaveDV has discovered a very disturbing image artifact that appears in purple and green blocks on overexposed edges. He’s not the only one, as others have replicated this exact same problem.

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For those who are looking to immediately get a specific look with their C300, or are looking to match some Canon DSLRs in-camera, AbelCine has created some custom scene profiles. These profiles have a range of uses, but they are ideal when using minimal color correction in post, because most of them push the highlights quite a bit. The standard Canon Log profile is still good for getting a flat image as it retains as much detail as possible in the highlights and shadows. More »

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When looking at cameras, it’s easy to get caught up in the numbers game — is the footage 4:4:4; how many stops of latitude does it have; will it output raw?  These features and numbers are important, but it’s easy to forget what they mean, and how they actually impact your footage.  It doesn’t help that it can be hard to get your hands on original files with full shooting details, instead of compressed internet versions that may have been corrected three ways till Sunday.  With this in mind, Gaal Laszlo has put up an informative and interesting guide to the Canon C300 that aims to show just how the numbers play out in actual footage — he has included original files for download and comparison, along with a great and detailed explanation: More »

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Alex Buono, Director of Photography for Saturday Night Live, has been shooting on DSLRs for quite some time (the intro for the show was in fact shot on a Canon 5D Mark II and 7D). Here, he gets his hands on a C300, shoots some spots for the show, and talks about his impressions of the camera (which are quite positive). Here’s the video, courtesy Clint Milby: More »

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UPDATE: B&H has posted official U.S. pricing for the C300, and it is $16k (ships “after January 30″). Thanks to everyone who commented on my post about the Sony F3 versus the Canon C300, I have a clearer sense of the C300′s strengths (that post was largely about its weaknesses). As I said in a comment, for a documentary camera (especially of the cinéma vérité variety) the C300 may be the best option out there. Several years ago, for example, I shot a short doc in the Ecuadorian Amazon jungle, and in that setting the recording time — both in terms of storage space and battery power — was a chief concern, as was low light ability (there was no electricity for 200 miles and night scenes were candlelit with no other option). The C300 would be the absolute best camera in the world for this. In the below series of videos, Rodney Charters, Lan Bui and Drew Gardner weigh in on the C300. But first, since we’re talking about documentary use, here’s Dan Chung’s picturesque short C300 doc: More »

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Rodney Charters needs no introduction (he’s best known as the DP of 24), and along with Drew Gardner and Lan Bui he recently got his hands on the Canon C300. The camera is absolutely the post-DSLR camera of the moment in the sense that it uses the DSLR form factor in a way that the Sony F3 does not, and also in the sense that it is convenient like a DSLR in a way that the RED SCARLET is not. But “camera of the decade?” Sure, if the decade was 2000-2010. 2010-2020… I’m not so sure. Here are their very informal behind-the-scenes videos: More »

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Here’s an excellent test/review of the Canon C300 camcorder by Paul Steinberg. He shoots a number of low light shots with the camera but also manages to “break” the 8-bit codec, in his own words. It’s hard to make out what is C300 compression and what is internet h.264 compression, but in Paul’s words “you can see a ton of quantizing little blocks” — even when viewed on a TV. No matter how good your 8-bit implementation is… it’s still 8 bits. Is this a deal breaker for you? More »

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Preproduction Canon C300 cameras have been floating around for a while, and now DSLR/video maestro Philip Bloom has released an excellent video review. As Bloom notes, the camera is a hybrid: the C300 is the answer to the question, “what would happen if a Canon DSLR and Canon XF camcorder had a baby?” Check it out if you’re interested in the C300, which rumor has it will retail stateside for virtually the same price as the Sony F3 (currently $14k), substanitally less than the originally-quoted $20k. Here’s Philip’s review: More »

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A 30 minute short film sponsored by Canon and shot on the Canon C300 and 5D Mark II, When You Find Me premiered on YouTube this week and will reportedly go offline tomorrow morning. So I figured I’d share it while it lasts — if the full film has been taken down, the trailer is below. Executive produced by Ron Howard and directed by his daughter Bryce Dallas Howard, here it is in full here is the trailer (the full film was taken down according to schedule): More »

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How do the Canon C300 and Sony F3, pictured respectively at left, compare? Mario Feil, director of the just-posted C300 short, has released the following comparison video. There’s also a Canon 1D Mark IV thrown in, which quite frankly looks awful at these high ISO levels: More »

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I’ve said that for all intents and purposes the RED SCARLET-X and Canon C300 are the same price and shipping at the same time, and even though production units of the SCARLET-X started shipping first, it’s interesting that there’s a lot more C300 footage out there than there is SCARLET stuff. This is partly due to the fact that the first SCARLET units are likely in the hands of pro RED acolytes like Steven Soderbergh, David Fincher, Peter Jackson, and Greg Williams, and those guys are too busy to post camera tests or reviews — but Nino Leitner has just posted a C300 review and a short. Here ’tis: More »

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Continuing their head-to-head matchup, manuals for both the RED SCARLET-X and Canon C300 cameras have been released. Neither of these cameras are available widely yet — the SCARLET-X is just beginning to ship in volume (including my own), whereas the C300 has another month or so before it’s shipping. Therefore one of the ways to get a virtual hands-on with either camera is to RTFM. More »

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I was just saying something about how the Canon C300 is looking better and better… and now there’s an “awesome” (and funny) camera test further bolstering the case for the initially-maligned shooter. I was actually just doing some scripting for a humorous camera test of my SCARLET-X, but I think by the time my camera arrives in Brooklyn there will have been so many tests that it will be old hat. Still, I’m always a fan of tests that add some humor or story or something to the shot list, and Jonathan Yi’s test demonstrates many of the ways the C300 is superior not only to its cheaper HDSLR ancestors but also to the RED (check out the high ISO tests): More »

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Tongue-in-cheek headline aside, the more time passes, the better the Canon EOS C300 looks. Vashi Nedomansky, Vincent Laforet’s editor on Mobius, stopped by to share how far the 8-bit codec of the C300 could be pushed. I don’t regret my decision to order a SCARLET-X — one major reason being the upgrade path that the camera has — but if you’re looking to shoot guerrilla projects with available lighting, the Sony FS100, F3, or Canon C300 would probably be a better choice given you can walk into a room with natural light and more easily shoot at high ISOs than you can with a RED. For my purposes (shooting a narrative feature film), we’ll be using lights, and that’s a different situation. Here’s the latest on the somewhat controversial Canon C300: More »