» Posts Tagged ‘cinema5d’

Description image

Sony a5100 FrontEarlier in the week, we were introduced to a brand new bite-sized camera from Sony, the A5100. We already knew that Sony’s new camera, which comes in at $550 for the body, would have the ability to output uncompressed 8 bit 4:2:2 via the mini HDMI port and be able to record to the XAVC-S codec, both firsts for a camera of this size and price. However, we had no idea what kind of performance (in terms of dynamic range, rolling shutter, and overall image quality) would be possible with the camera’s CMOS sensor. Luckily, just like they did with the A7s, the folks at Cinema5D put the A5100 to the test, and their results are fairly exciting. More »

Description image

Sony a7sEarlier in the week, we shared a comparison of the dynamic range of the Sony a7S to a few other popular cameras, and the results were enlightening. It turns out that the combination of the massive pixels of the a7S sensor and the ability to shoot with an S-log2 gamma curve provides for some impressive dynamic range, to say the very least. Of course, we all know that no camera system is perfect, and the a7S is no exception, especially in regards to rolling shutter. In another comparative test from Cinema5D, they measured the effects of rolling shutter on a variety of popular CMOS cameras, and unfortunately, our beloved a7S didn’t fare well at all. More »

Description image

Sony a7S at NAB 2014While the full-frame 1080p/4K a7S from Sony is proving to be an absolute beast in low-light situations, it’s far more than just a night-shooting camera. Besides resolving what looks like a very solid 1080p image (an external recorder is required for 4K), it’s also got some pretty fantastic dynamic range. How good? Well the folks over at cinema5D took the camera for a spin, and measured it at over 14 stops, right next to the ARRI AMIRA, which uses the same sensor as the even higher-end ALEXA, which is being used on tons of Hollywood and indie features. More »

Description image

cinema5D ARRI AMIRA ReviewARRI introduced the ENG-style AMIRA back in September of last year, surprising quite a few people who were expecting a low-cost ALEXA, but not necessarily aimed at a different audience. ARRI sees this new camera as more of a TV or documentary tool, since it is designed to fit more comfortably on your shoulder and has better access to functions on the operator side. Even though it has a max resolution of 2K, it has the same sensor as the ALEXA, which means the footage has that signature ARRI look. Sebastian from cinema5D recently reviewed the camera and shot some beautiful footage with it. More »

Description image

cinema5D On The Couch - Rodney Charters, Bruce LoganAt NAB 2014, cinema5D introduced a video series called “On the Couch,” which featured both representatives of manufacturers and filmmakers from all walks of life. Cinematographers Rodney Charters and Bruce Logan, as well as Steven and Jens from Zacuto were all featured in a terrific video near the end of the show. The conversation ranges from gear, to how DPs are being left out of the color suite, to how realistic 4K will be as a display resolution in the coming years, and how 4K is allowing for even more butchering of the cinematographer’s original intent in post-production. More »

Description image

Sony RX10Sony made a bit of camera history back in October, by announcing the first full-frame mirrorless cameras, the A7 and A7R. While those got most of the headlines, Sony also introduced the RX10, a 20 Megapixel fixed-lens camera with a sensor right around Super 16mm. Doesn’t sound too interesting on the surface but the fixed lens is actually a great range of 8.8mm to 73.3mm (24-200mm full-frame equivalent), with a constant aperture of f/2.8. Let’s also not forget the built-in 3-stop ND filter and image stabilization, and you’ve got a pretty interesting video camera that you can hold in the palm of your hand. More »

Description image

Video thumbnail for vimeo video Panasonic 4K Varicam - nofilmschoolEver since ‘digital’ became synonymous with ‘cinema,’ digital motion picture cameras have held a kind of dual citizenship. Now, any such camera can be considered either a video camera or a digital cinema camera. The only difference is how the camera’s used. Manufacturers such as JVC and Panasonic have mostly stuck to professional broadcast and prosumer video solutions — leaving the expressed digicine market in the hands of peers like Sony. Regardless, the push for 4K and UHD has leaked into broadcast and prosumer realms, leaving some folks (such as myself) wondering: when will Panasonic get to the party? And, in what way? Read some details on Panasonic’s upcoming 4K Varicam, and reasoning behind its 4K hesitancy, below. More »

Description image

Canon 70D BackAfter many years of releasing similar cameras with small changes, Canon has finally unleashed a brand new technology inside the new 70D they are calling Dual Pixel CMOS AF. The major breakthrough with this technology is that it should give excellent autofocus whether you’re in stills mode or in video mode. Now, you might be thinking you’d never want or need anything like that, but Johnnie Behiri over at cinema5D took the 70D for a spin to test not only the video quality, but how good the autofocus actually is. Check those videos out below. More »

Description image

There were rumors that Leica would be announcing a new camera with video capabilities, and sure enough, with their new $7,000 full-frame 24 Megapixel Leica M, they added a video function. There is a lot of love for Leica out there thanks to their sharp and bokeh-licious lenses, and their simple but high-quality digital cameras, and while their pricing is a bit high, adding a video mode means another possible option for those looking for compact and impressive image quality. But what does the video look like? Johnnie Behiri over at cinema5D recently took the Lecia M for a spin. Check out his results as well as some other Leica M videos below. More »

Description image

Sebastian at Cinema5D has released a short film shot on his Canon-mount SCARLET, and some very nice video overviews to go with it. Since you can’t get your hands on a RED camera at a normal camera shop — they only sell direct — these video overviews are very helpful. Here’s the short, which was shot in 3 hours on the Canon 24-70mm f2.8L lens (more details on the shoot here) and graded in DaVinci Resolve: More »