» Posts Tagged ‘cinematographers’

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CropperCapture[77]There are many jobs in the filmmaking process. It all starts with a script, a story waiting to be told. Then there’s the director, the visionary, the person with the plan. But we all know that filmmaking is highly collaborative, so a team begins to emerge, with a group of like-minded artists all striving towards the same goal. You’ve got your art directors and production designers, and new worlds are created. You’ve got your editors, who lovingly craft the footage into the final piece of art. You’ve got your makeup artists and VFX artists and loads of other craftspeople who ultimately shape the film in some unique way. And then there’s the cinematographer, the person behind the lens. But what exactly does a cinematographer do, and what does it mean to be a cinematographer? The following short video from the EFTI School of Cinematography in Spain has the answer. More »

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FARGO -- Pictured: Billy Bob Thornton as Lorne Malvo -- CR: FX/Matthias ClamerWhen I first heard that the Coen brothers’ iconic Minnesota masterpiece Fargo was going to be adapted into an FX miniseries, my first thought was, “Well jeez, that sure is a swell idea,” (in a thick Minnesotan accent, of course). After my initial excitement, the skepticism set in. How could anybody possibly create an episodic variation on Fargo, while appealing to modern audiences and paying homage to the original? Despite the enormity of that undertaking, show-runner Noah Hawley and his team not only created a show that lives up to the Coen classic, but a show that is easily one of the year’s (if not the decade’s) best. The show’s DP Dana Gonzales recently sat down with Ben Consoli on the Go Creative Show to talk about everything from Fargo’s locations to its glorious, yet understated cinematography. More »

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Phedon PapamichaelSimple and logical — that’s how Oscar-nominated cinematographer Phedon Papamichael describes his approach to painting with light, which I think is spot on when taking a look at many of the films he has worked on over the span of his 25-year career. As the subject of an intimate and illuminating video profile from Alexandros Maragos’ site, Momentum, the Nebraska DP shares details about his early years as a young cinematographer, describes how he was encouraged to work in film by indie film hero John Cassavetes, got his start in the business with Roger Corman, as well as lets us in on his beautiful, simple approach to cinematography. More »

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lightOftentimes when new filmmakers look at their footage and they’re wondering why it doesn’t have that “movie quality” look, it’s not because of the camera they’re using. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: a huge part of making films look cinematic  is how well you implement lighting, and some insanely talented and exciting cinematographers, including Phedon Papamichael (Nebraska), Rodrigo Prieto (The Wolf of Wall Street), and Rachel Morrison (Fruitvale Station) share their favorite tools to work with in an article for HD Video Pro. More »

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Chris DoyleAt this point, it should be no secret that Christopher Doyle is one of my absolute favorite cinematographers (he might even be my spirit animal). I’ve talked about him on many occasions, sharing a fantastic cinematography masterclass, as well as tons of interviews, plus a few more interviews. Maybe it’s his unique perspective on the filmmaking and artistic processes, or the fantastic way in which he moves the camera in relation to character blocking, or maybe it’s just that amazing hair style. Whatever the reason, Doyle is an amazing cinematographer and a one-of-a-kind artist, and there is much that we can learn from his unique, eccentric way of being. More »

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Inside Llewyn DavisOf the many amazing films that were released in 2013, few looked as unique, or as stylistically gorgeous, as the Coens’ love song to the 1960′s NY folk scene, Inside Llewyn DavisOf course, Roger Deakins, the regular cinematographer for the Coen brothers, was not available to shoot the film, so the prolific filmmaking duo turned to another industry legend, acclaimed French DP Bruno Delbonnel, who is most known for his stunning work on Amélie. The fine folks at Cinefii recently sat down with Delbonnel at the Cameraimage Festival in Poland, where he revealed many of the techniques that he used to create the unique aesthetic of Inside Llewyn Davis, as well as some insights into what it’s like to work with Joel and Ethan Coen. More »

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John TollAll of us who are aspiring filmmakers have a list of films that inspire us. Maybe we’ve even got one film, or one specific shot, that singularly piqued our interest in the medium and inspired us to work within it. In a recent feature over on the Empire website, 21 of the world’s most respected cinematographers, everyone from Roger Deakins to John Toll, shared the films and shots that inspired them. Here are a few of my favorites from this fantastic list. More »

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Darius KhondjiAfter one glance at Darius Khondji’s IMDb page it’s easy to see that the famed French cinematographer is a living legend. From his work with David Fincher (Se7en, Panic Room), to Michael Haneke (Funny Games, Amour), to Woody Allen (Midnight in Paris, To Rome With Love), and my personal favorite, Jean Pierre Jeunet/Marc Caro (Delicatessen, City of Lost Children), it’s safe to say the Khondji has had a storied career as a cinematographer. IndieWire recently talked with Khodji about his advice for low-budget cinematographers who are shooting on location, and needless to say, the man had some invaluable tips. Here are a few of my favorites. More »

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OscarWe’ve talked quite a bit about online petitions lately. First it was Kentucker Audley satirically urging independent filmmakers to give up their dreams for the greater good of the film industry. Then, in the wake of the Sarah Jones tragedy, it was a petition to have her recognized during the “In Memoriam” segment at Sunday’s Academy Awards. And now, fellow No Film Schoolers, we have another petition to unleash on you, a petition to split the Oscar for “Best Cinematography” into two separate categories. Read on to see what all of the fuss is about. More »

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Sundance CinematographersIt’s safe to say that there’s absolutely no shortage of advice floating around when it comes to the various aspects of the filmmaking. From writing and directing to shooting and editing, the internet is rife with advice from everyone and their mother. However, not all advice is good advice. The folks at Indiewire know this, and in their extensive interviewing of the cinematographers of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, they managed to dig up both the best and worst advice that these excellent DP’s had ever received. The results are borderline enlightening. Read on to see what these cinematographers had to say. More »

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Crane SunsetHere at No Film School, we’re massive fans of Evan Luzi’s website, The Black and Blue. If you’re an aspiring camera assistant, or if you’re aspiring to any camera department position, then the B&B is the single best resource on the entirety of the internet (not to mention that the newly re-designed site is absolutely gorgeous). Evan recently posted an article featuring advice from 88 of the world’s best cinematographers, and seeing so much great advice in one place can only be described as astounding. More »

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Cinefii BSDWe’ve talked about Cinefii’s bite-sized dailies a couple of times before. For those who are unfamiliar with these fantastic little videos, they are short “bite-sized” interviews with the most accomplished DP’s in the world, in which they expound on all sorts of questions about the art and technology of cinematography. Since we last wrote about these videos a couple of months ago, a veritable plethora of new videos have been published. So without any further ado, here’s Bruno Delbonnel, Sean Bobbitt, Vilmos Zsigmond, and Chris Doyle to drop some mad cinematography knowledge on you! More »

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filmstockIt’s the debate of the decade; is film dead as a capture medium? The answer to that question is manifold, and you would likely get just as many different answers as the number of people who you asked. Sure, shooting film is no longer taught in most film schools (there are a few exceptions). And sure, the cost of raw stock, processing, and high-resolution DIs are up since Fuji stopped production of capture stocks, and local film labs have disappeared left and right. Based on those factors alone, it would seem safe to assume that film is headed the way of the dinosaurs, and rather quickly. More »

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Cinefii BSDCinematography is a lot like alchemy. It’s one part science, one part art, two parts teamwork, and maybe a little voodoo sprinkled in for good measure. Cinematography is one of those practices that is so multi-faceted, yet so subjective, that it is nearly impossible to be a true master of the art. However, it’s quite possible to find, define, and master your own voice as a DP, and that’s what many of the greatest cinematographers in history have done. Cinefii has put out a series of short videos called “Bite Size Dailies” which feature interviews with some of the leading DP’s in the industry. In these interviews they expound on various questions which should be of use to all of us aspiring cinematographers as we try to find our own cinematographic voices. Here are a few of my favorites: More »