» Posts Tagged ‘crane’

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Can Huge Camera Cranes Be Affordable & Functional? Luke Neumann Says Yes - No Film SchoolGetting a large crane shot can be nearly impossible on a budget. Very often crane operators are not cheap, and the equipment is also expensive to rent. But what options do lower-budget folks have? Turns out there is some cheaper gear out there that should perform admirably and give you big-budget results. Luke Neumann of Neumann Films reviews one such piece of gear below, the Came-TV 33 ft. crane: More »

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Gemini JibSomething as simple as moving your camera will add not only the kinetic energy you may need to keep your work from being boring, but the sophistication you may desire for your professional career as well. The tools we use to do this are often big, heavy, and only serve one purpose, but Digital Juice has announced their light and versatile Gemini Dual-Action Jib, the industry’s “first transformable jib”. Not only can you utilize the Gemini from the back for a number of different crane shots, but you can also move to the front and operate it like a handheld stabilizer. More »

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Screen Shot 2013-12-11 at 12.13.38 PMHere at No Film School we often talk about various pieces of gear. Unfortunately, the common sentiment seems to be that gear needs to be priced to own in order for it to be of any use to the readers of a site about low-budget and DIY filmmaking. However, focusing solely on the lower-priced gear can potentially leave people unaware of the gear that they would likely encounter on larger film sets. With that in mind, here’s a brief introduction to a piece of gear that you will never own, but one that you may very well see on various sets, the Panavision Supertechno 100-foot crane. More »

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DIY JibAs no-budget/independent filmmakers, achieving the look of high production value and not spending a ton of money are always at the forefront of our mind, and finding the optimal point at which those two things meet is our main concern. Often, that means a DIY solution. Chung Dha shares with us his process of constructing an inexpensive DIY jib with a remote tilt, which will give you more versatility and control over your film’s aesthetics, while not causing you to break the bank while doing it. Continue on for his tutorial. More »

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There’s a variety of rigs out there for pretty much all your mounting needs — Cinevate and of course Kessler are go-to solutions for jibs running the gamut from heavy-duty to collapsible, respectively. The same goes for shoulder rigs, with options ranging from professional solutions to lightweight prefabs all the way down to homebrew kits. Of course, something that can pull double duty as a portable jib and custom shoulder rig — which you can put together yourself for $50, to boot — may be the best of, like, three worlds. Read on to check out some details — plus info on how to build your own 360 degree panoramic head mount, plus some hardcore DIY stabilizers — all geared toward the low-to-no budget but crafty shooter. More »

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Have you been jonesing for arcing vertical and horizontal camera moves?  Perhaps you simply want an easy way to elevate your camera without having to climb a fence or set your tripod ontop of a chair.  Well, you’re in luck.  Here are two DIY jib projects that will let you do those things for less than $30 and a bit of your time.  The first is a small jib arm courtesy of Olivia Tech, the second is a slightly larger jib project from The Frugal Filmmaker, check out these videos to see them in action: More »