» Posts Tagged ‘davidfincher’

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CropperCapture[30]The basics of the film language are just that, basics. You’ve got your wides and mediums and close-ups, and all sorts of variances in between. You’ve got OTS shots and 2-shots, and of course some cutaways. Then you’ve got the insert, the simple, lowly insert. Usually inserts are used to provide a closer look at some detail in a scene. However, when the insert shot becomes an instrumental part of a film’s individual language, some interesting things can happen. For instance, David Fincher’s masterful and suspenseful thriller Zodiac makes extensive use of the insert shot, and it has a profound and meaningful impact on how the film’s language interacts with and supports the characters and story.  More »

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Gone GirlEarlier this week, Adobe unveiled the features that will be rolling out in the next version of their Creative Cloud video apps, and the response thus far has been an incredibly positive one, especially for features such as DCP creation in Media Encoder and masking/tracking directly in Premiere. However, Adobe released quite a bit of other new information about their video products on Wednesday, most notably the fact that David Fincher’s upcoming film, an adaptation of the Gillian Flynn novel Gone Girl, is being cut exclusively on Premiere Pro by Kirk Baxter ACE. Will this be a major turning point for Adobe’s filmmaking software in regards to its use in Hollywood? Let’s take a look. More »

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Darius KhondjiAfter one glance at Darius Khondji’s IMDb page it’s easy to see that the famed French cinematographer is a living legend. From his work with David Fincher (Se7en, Panic Room), to Michael Haneke (Funny Games, Amour), to Woody Allen (Midnight in Paris, To Rome With Love), and my personal favorite, Jean Pierre Jeunet/Marc Caro (Delicatessen, City of Lost Children), it’s safe to say the Khondji has had a storied career as a cinematographer. IndieWire recently talked with Khodji about his advice for low-budget cinematographers who are shooting on location, and needless to say, the man had some invaluable tips. Here are a few of my favorites. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Watch Scenes from 'Fight Club' Without Tyler Durden & 'The Shining' Without Delbert Grady - No Film SchoolIf you haven’t seen David Fincher’s Fight Club, it’s probably a good idea to either watch it right now or stop reading this post immediately. Brad Pitt plays Tyler Durden in the film, and while there are a few glimpses without him in the movie, we’ve got almost a whole scene with his character removed. The creator, Richard Trammell, has also a new video that he just released along the same theme of unreliable narrators, showing a scene from The Shining without Delbert Grady (you should probably watch that one, too, if you haven’t). More »

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David FincherDavid Fincher’s films are known for many things, but being traditional isn’t one of them. His grim themes, low-key lighting, and aversion to happy endings work in tandem with unusual subject matter, which makes for some bleak filmmaking. The genius of Fincher is found in his ability to tap into the beautiful dark side of humanity, evoking fear, anger, and intrigue with his audience. So, what kinds of films does a director of his caliber see as important pieces of cinema? In a hand-written note, Fincher lists 26 of what he considers the greatest movies, ranging from a seemingly obvious influence, Taxi Driver, to ones that seem to come out of left field, like Animal House. More »

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Fight-Club-Brad-PittWhen Chuck Palahniuk’s Fight Club was making the rounds in Hollywood, it didn’t seem like a very promising book to be adapted for the screen. But then Brad Pitt got involved; add David Fincher and Ed Norton, and you’ve got a 90s’ classic film — a perfect pre-millenium tension piece that captured the weird pre-Y2K mood in America. Over at Cinephilia and Beyond, they’ve got a great collection of information on Fight Club, including an interview with the screenwriter, Jim Uhls, as well as behind the scenes production footage. Click below to learn the first rule of writing about Fight ClubMore »

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I mentioned we might be seeing a comeback for real black and white, and it looks like we’ve got one of our first examples on a big scale. We knew David Fincher was working with RED’s new black and white camera the EPIC Monochrome, but it wasn’t clear exactly what that production was. His new Netflix series House of Cards was shot on regular RED EPICs, but now it’s been confirmed on REDUser that Justin Timberlake’s new music video for Suit & Tie featuring Jay-Z was shot with the Monochrome. Click through to check it out. More »

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On February 1st, Netflix released the first 13 episodes of the first season of House of Cards, marking a potentially monumental shift in the way we watch content. By now it’s very likely a number of you have seen the entirety of the series starring Kevin Spacey. While it’s not the first original series for Netflix (that would be Lilyhammer), House of Cards is one of the most (if not the most) expensive television shows in history, and has attracted some of the biggest names in Hollywood — like director David Fincher. But will the experiment work, or will binge-viewing ultimately hurt those who produce content? More »

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David Fincher, who is often on the cutting edge when it comes to technology – even directing the first movie shot and projected in 4K and recently using a Monochrome RED EPIC-M – is now crowdfunding a new animated film called The Goon. It was only a matter of time before the big boys moseyed on down and got in on the Kickstarter action, but this isn’t the first Hollywood project to crowdfund it’s way into production. Bret Easton Ellis and Paul Schrader’s The Canyons was successful back in June to the tune of $159,000. The difference here, though, is that the money is not going to the actual film itself, but to a fully-realized Story Reel that includes vocal performances from Paul Giamatti and Clancy Brown. Click through for the Kickstarter launch video. More »

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As the large-sensor camera market gets more and more crowded, manufacturers are coming up with new ways of differentiating themselves. Here’s something unique that I don’t think many saw coming: RED has just announced a monochrome version of the RED EPIC-M. Yes, it only does black-and-white. Why would they do this? Because without the need to debayer (the process by which colors are interpolated from otherwise colorless data), the full luminance values can be utilized, giving sharper and theoretically lower-noise images. David Fincher is reportedly already shooting with the EPIC Monochrome. More »

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Jeff Cronenweth, ASC, has worked on a number of big Hollywood films, notably Fight Club, The Social Network, and more recently The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – which we’ve talked about here before because of its interesting post workflow. Besides feature films, Cronenweth has also shot and directed quite a few music videos and commercials – which is where his collaborator David Fincher also got his start. He shares insights about digital filmmaking and his working relationship with notoriously take-heavy Fincher in this four-part Oscar Q&A provided by Creatasphere. More »

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With all the hype surrounding 4K acquisition, I was surprised to hear that David Fincher’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo would be the first large-scale end-to-end 4K digital cinema release. Previous films captured at 4K were posted and distributed at 2K… which kind of defeats the purpose. In my quest to find a 4K theater to see GWTDT, I got a response from Sony’s Digital Cinema Twitter account, yet because I’ve been catching holiday films with my family (including young ones) I haven’t yet had a chance to see the film yet (it seems I’m not the only one in this situation). Regardless, I wanted to share a very interesting article about the film’s 4K workflow by Light Iron’s Michael Cioni, which includes this interesting nugget on Fincher’s approach to reframing in post (his framing chart is pictured): More »

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I had no idea when watching David Fincher’s generation-defining (yeah, I said it) The Social Network that the RED-shot film would utilize a post-production process similar to what you or I could execute. It turns out that the crew on the award-winning film conformed all shots — and did some basic visual effects work — using Adobe After Effects, after utilizing Premiere Pro to get their Final Cut Pro timeline into AE. Yes, they also used higher-end tools — notably Quantel’s Pablo for the color grade — but the basic editing tools are the same as you or I might use on a no-budget project. Here’s Fincher and assistant editor Tyler Nelson on the process: More »

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I’m not sure why this project is holding my attention so. David Fincher and Sony Pictures aren’t exactly DIY filmmaking, so it’s not hugely topical to this site. And on the list of true stories I’d like to see told by Hollywood, the founding of Facebook isn’t on top. But with the official trailer for The Social Network hitting the web today, I can’t help but stay interested in the project. The RED-shot film is loosely based on the book The Accidental Billionaires and the trailer is masterfully cut to a choral version of Radiohead’s Creep by the Scala and Kolacny Brothers. The film itself will be scored by Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor, who says of the film, “it’s really fucking good. And dark!” Trent Reznor is calling a film about Facebook “dark?” Maybe that’s why I’m interested. More »