» Posts Tagged ‘development’

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Austin Film FestivalOne of the most important career skills a screenwriter should learn is how to take a meeting. New screenwriters may dread these meetings, but preparation and knowledge of the development process can help even the most reticent writers express their visions clearly to people with the power to turn their screenplays into film and television. Thanks to the 20th Austin Film Festival and Conference, we heard from a panel of development executives spanning film, television and animation who offered their advice to screenwriters on how to take meetings and explained exactly what the development process looks like from their perspectives. More »

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Have you got an idea for a “smart, character-driven” comedy series?  Or maybe an educationally themed children’s show?  Then Amazon Studios may be interested.  We’ve previously discussed Amazon Studios with relation to filmmaking, as well as their evolving screenwriting terms.  Now it appears they are opening a new development front on the series end.  With the potential to earn $10,000 if your pitch is accepted for the Development Slate (and more if the series actually goes into production) it may be worth a look — if you’re willing to live with the Amazon Studios model and their terms.  So what are they looking for?  And what should you be looking for? More »

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This video by Robert Pratten is a great introduction to what transmedia is and how it can be employed by the independent filmmaker (he also has a refreshing perspective on the “technological fetish” of our obsession with new camera technologies!). It’s a 45-minute presentation full of brain candy and should be required viewing for anyone thinking about telling stories across mediums. As Pratten stresses, “transmedia plays to indie’s strengths,” because delivering a consistency of story across platforms is possible for independent creators — not large studios made up of divided teams. In my opinion, his point about authenticity is even more important, because: I could care less about playing a social game if the original auteur had nothing to do with it, and I could care even less about buying a DVD if I suspect only 65 cents of a $15 purchase is going to find its way back to the original filmmaker. Creating our own cross-platform projects and retaining ownership not only gives us more creative control on all of the different incarnations of our story, it can also motivate fans to make purchases because they know we’re the ones benefiting from their support.

In addition to the above presentation, however, Pratten has written some very helpful articles at the Workbook Project on the process of developing transmedia projects: More »