» Posts Tagged ‘digital’

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Imax cameraIMAX announced today that they have developed the first fully integrated dual 65mm 4K digital large-format 3D camera, designed to give moviegoers a “truly immersive IMAX 3D experience” with the camera’s exceptional crispness and clarity, as well as its 1.9:1 aspect ratio that offers a reported “26% more of the image than standard cinemas.” Oh, and guess what — it has already been used and vetted by none other than explosion maestro Michael Bay and cinematographer Amir Mokri on Transformers: Age of Extinction. More »

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kendricken_celluloid_film_fuji_fujifilm_production_manufacture_cancelWith modern digital cinema cameras, it is often preferable to achieve a look that is more “cinematic” than “digital.” No one factor creates a filmic feel, but the precedent is simple enough — film itself. The emulation of emulsion may depend on anything from lens choice and lighting to grading and grain plug-ins, but there is one sure-fire way to get a true film look: using film. Celluloid acquisition may be beyond the budget of your shoot, but using a “film intermediate” process — that is, transferring color corrected digital footage out to film, then scanning back to digital — could be one technique for splitting the difference. A webinar with VFX artist & colorist Jerome Thelia details just such a process, regarding the Oscar-winning short film Curfew. Read on for details. More »

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Film v Digital“Which looks better: film or digital?” It’s one of those questions that can’t really be answered, because every filmmaker has different tastes and opinions, but Joey Shanks (you might know him from his awesome stop motion/in-camera effects tutorials) puts film and digital head to head to show the difference between what the two mediums look like in stop motion animation. He even challenges viewers to guess what the last clip was recorded with, and will reveal the answer come December 26th. It’s harder than you might think, but continue on to see for yourself! More »

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Nolab CartridgeThere is no shortage of film cameras on the market these days. From small 8mm and Super 8 cameras to Super 16 and Super 35 film cameras, there are many available for rental or purchase. In a technical sense, these cameras can never truly become obsolete because they are analogue and purely mechanical by nature. There’s only one problem: film is really damn expensive. Not only the stock itself, but the processing and the DI as well. But what if these old mechanical cameras could be repurposed with modern technology in order to create digital images? Well, with the Nolab Digital Super 8 Cartridge, they can. More »

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Panavision Primo VIn the past few weeks we’ve talked multiple times about high-end cinema lenses. First, we shared a brief comparison of the Zeiss Compact Zooms and Arri-Zeiss Ultra/Master Primes. Then last week, we talked about Cooke lenses and why the “Cooke Look” is so desirable to filmmakers. However, there’s one major brand of high-end cinema lenses that hasn’t gotten much NFS love yet, and that brand is Panavision. That trend is about to change, though, because Panavision just released their Primo V series of lenses, which just so happen to be the first cinema lenses designed specifically for large sensor, high-resolution digital cinema cameras. Read on to see what these lenses are all about. More »

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Digital Imaging Technician Harddrives [Photo by Christian Dressler]

This is part three of a 3-part series on the evolving role and responsibilities of the contemporary Digital Imaging Technician. Nofilmschool interviewed 4 working DITs from New York and L.A. to help contextualize the role they play and offer insights into the business. Part 1 went into misconceptions about DITs, part 2 offers information about getting hired — now this one is for the gear-head in all of us. Read on for a look into some tools and practices behind the job. More »

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Digital Bolex footageWith the little bit of footage we’ve been able to see coming from the Digital Bolex, it’s only natural that we not only want to see more of it, but also maybe a few tests of a wider range of conditions to get a better feeling of what the camera can do. Well, the team over at Digital Bolex has released new footage that tests how the camera performs in sunlight, as well as with skin tones. Though not on the long side, these two tests surely demonstrate the capabilities of the D16. Check out the videos after the jump. More »

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stock-footage-film-projector-dolly-shot-slow-motion-closeThe recent history of film as a capture medium has been a troubled one. First, Kodak filed for bankruptcy protection in early 2012. Then in the first quarter of 2013, Fuji halted production of motion picture capture stocks, thus leaving the financially troubled Kodak as the only remaining capture stock producer. Beyond these troubles, the rapid proliferation of digital capture has forced many processing facilities to shut down, and prices for transfers and high-resolution DI’s have skyrocketed. However, on Tuesday Kodak announced that it had emerged from its Chapter 11 restructuring as a leaner and more focused company. What does this mean for the future of film as a capture medium? More »

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FilmConvertAs we’ve mentioned before here at NFS, FilmConvert is one of the best film stock emulators we’ve seen. This program allows users to give their digital footage that much desired cinematic look by using the color information of specific cameras to determine how a specific film stock could best be represented using that sensor. Now, FilmConvert is asking filmmakers to enter their cinematography competition with videos processed by their program. Hit the jump for info on rules, prizes, and how to enter. More »

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CinefexSince 1980, quarterly publication Cinefex Magazine has been the go-to resource for VFX artists, professionals, and enthusiasts. This visual effects “bible” is also a time capsule of sorts, that has captured and documented the evolution of movie magic for the past 3 decades, and now they want to bring all of it to you digitally. Subscribers can currently access Cinefex issues, as well as a number of back issues on their iPads, computers, as well as physical copies, but publishing company New Scribbler Press wants to bring you every single issue — from the 1st to the latest — digitally, and on their interactive publishing platform. They just need a little help. More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video 'Computer Chess' Cinematographer Tours the Totally Tubular Sony AVC-3260 Vacuum Tube Camera - nofilmschoolAny audiophile can tell you about the subjectively superior sound rendition of a tube amplifier over a ‘solid state’ system. Vacuum tube circuitry just sort of – bends differently, or more smoothly. In amps, this can produce a more ‘organic feel’ or effect — but tubes were also used in video cameras, believe it or not. Due to the ubiquity of chip sensors, an aesthetic consideration like this doesn’t have much play in filmmaking these days. Or — does it? Sundance 2013 award-winner Computer Chess reaches back into the nearly forgotten history of analog, its creators opting to shoot on old Sony tube cameras. Take a tour of the camera, and its use to the film, with cinematographer Matthias Grunsky below. More »

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steenbeck editing tableI was in the last generation of filmmakers to cut their teeth on old Arriflex 16mm cameras and Steenbeck editing tables (do the math, but I’m old). Since the advent of non-linear editing hardware and software, it seems as though films have gotten — faster, but is this really the case, or an optical illusion? An exhaustive and searchable database of Average Shot Length from the birth of cinema to now is available online, and it shows the evolution of editing in cinema. Click below to see just how editors are cutting films today how they cut in the past, and what this means for you as an indie filmmaker. More »

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Film vs. Digital. Celluloid vs. Silicon. While the debate is beginning to die down due to economics and advancements in digital cinema cameras, a documentary on the subject called Side by Side takes a look at the issue with some of the premiere directors and cinematographers. We mentioned a few months ago that the doc, produced by Keanu Reeves, was available to buy, but now the film is available to watch right now on Netflix. Click through for some clips from the movie. More »

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Talk about your digital leatherman: The number of ridiculously handy — and practical, and portable, all in one — apps for filmmaking on mobile devices is probably one of the greatest tech-vantages we’ve got going for us these days second to low-cost high-res acquisition. Uses range from lighting plot diagramming and shooting scheduling all the way to Canon DSLR control via Android and RED control via iOS — there’s an app for all that, and more. Now, thanks to Adam Wilt of Pro Video Coalition (and a lot of other great stuff), your iPhone is now more of an asset on set than ever before — and that’s because his new $5 app Cine Meter turns your iOS device into a light meter, waveform monitor and false-color display. More »

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Just a few short months ago, it was announced that the Blackmagic Cinema Camera would be receiving a Micro 4/3 lens mount option alternative to its original Canon EF mount. Granted, for those of us still waiting on the BMCC to ship, a few short months is no stretch of time to merely shrug off — particularly when the mount announced was to be a “passive” or “dumb” one, meaning electronic control would not be supported for smart MFT lenses. There’s been speculation that this would change — and given Blackmagic’s recent addition to the consortium of companies aligned with the official Micro 4/3 standard, this speculation seems less outlandish than ever. More »

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Film is going the way of other elegant, exotic, but evolutionarily condemned creatures such as the Tasmanian Tiger, the Dodo bird, and the Macarena. Somehow chart the decline of film use against the rise of digital and you’ll hear a lot about ‘how to make digital look like film’ in your research. It’s almost an existential crisis for shooters of our transitional generation, and the heart of digital’s identity crisis. If film is the look of cinema, what’s the key ingredient? Resolution? Latitude — or worse, light response curve? Motion transfer? Color reproduction? Or should we just let “the digital look” evolve into its own beast altogether? That’s a lot of heavy questions for a Sunday afternoon read, but ones unavoidably raised by a post from Art Adams of Pro Video Coalition about the wide open lensed and low light look of ’80′s and ’90′s films. More »

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Ever wondered what format, camera model, lens type, finishing format, lens manufacturer, etc. was used to create a certain film? You may have found yourself punching in IMDb as your default movie trivia database, and you may have found some or all such information in the film’s technical specs page — or you may not have. While IMDb has a lot of other coverage to keep itself occupied logging (particularly cast and crew lists), you may find yourself wanting a more detailed and dedicated technical breakdown — enter ‘ShotOnWhat?More »

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Amazon has just announced a new service integrated into its powerful music sales tier called AutoRip, which grants CD buyers an immediately downloadable digital copy of that very album — or any CD purchased on Amazon for the last fifteen years (if it’s in the catalogue). Previously, you might have ripped the CD yourself when it came in the mail. AutoRip does the same thing, except, well… it’s automatic, and instant. Actually, the service sounds so obvious it’s almost a wonder no one thought of it sooner. In response, though, I have to ask: music and CDs are great, for sure — but why stop there? While you’re at it, Amazon, why not do the same for films too? More »

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The media management and quality control handled by the digital imaging technician and post house is nearly universally vital in modern filmmaking, where each digital camera brings its own varying formats, workflows, and quirks. This need for DITs and post houses, however, may evaporate just as quickly as it has arisen — at least according to the predictions of Michael Cioni. As the CEO of post house Light Iron, he has helped pioneer RED workflows at the highest level of filmmaking, so his word is not to be taken lightly — particularly since he’s predicting the end of what his and any other post house does as we know it by 2017. Furthermore, what cameras (and therefore camera teams) will have to take care of themselves is staggering, especially taking a look at the duties fulfilled by today’s high-end DIT carts — including those assembled by Light Iron itself. More »

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About a year ago, the last motion picture film camera rolled off the assembly line, marking a historic day in film history. Now we have Fujifilm deciding that it will no longer be producing motion picture film, and Kodak is continuing its bankruptcy proceedings, selling off its still photography division, and ending its printer business. Just five years ago, the idea that motion picture film may be going the way of the dinosaur was unimaginable. Sure, RED had come along and given us the first real glimpse of the true digital replacement, but the technology still seemed a long ways off. With the economic downturn — and certainly some mismanagement along the way — Kodak was the first to show signs of danger, and now Fuji sees the writing on the wall, and is getting out of the game before it’s too late. But what else will contribute to the demise of film? More »