» Posts Tagged ‘digitalcinema’

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Quentin Tarantino Cannes 2014 Press ConferenceQuentin Tarantino has not been shy about his distaste for all things digital. He has stayed true to shooting on 35mm film, but most theaters and distributors are moving away from projecting in the format. Speaking at the Cannes Film Festival (where a 20th anniversary screening of Pulp Fiction is the only film showing in 35mm), Tarantino again reiterated his displeasure about digital projection, going so far as to say that the loss of 35mm projection means that what he knew as cinema is dead. More »

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Kinefinity_KINEMAX_6K1Kinefinity, the Chinese company that has been making scientific cameras for years, is now making some waves in the cinema camera market. Their first two models received a bit of attention for the features offered in such affordable packages, but now we are getting the next generation of those models, the KineMINI and KineMAX, which give 4K and 6K resolutions, respectively. We talked with Kinefinity at NAB, and while we already knew the 4K camera was going to come in around $3-$6,000 depending on the package, we now have some official pricing for the 6K camera (which is also capable of 14 stops of dynamic range, and an incredible 16 stops in a special 3K mode), and it’s being offered for a limited time under $10,000. More »

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kinefinity kineraw mini 6k 4k 2k raw high definition video cameraThere’s been a lot of buzz regarding affordable 4K acquisition recently, and for good reason. How about affordable 6K? You may know Chinese manufacturer Kinefinity for its strangely familiar-looking family of cameras, but with features like simultaneous compressed and uncompressed RAW recording and very competitive pricing, it’s a family with merits all its own. Our crew on the floor of NAB 2014 talked to Michel Juknat, a Kinefinity european distributor, discussing the ~$5K KineMINI 4K camera in depth and hitting upon the upcoming KineMAX 6K camera. Check out the video below — plus some KineMINI footage from Michel himself. More »

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kendricken_celluloid_film_fuji_fujifilm_production_manufacture_cancelWith modern digital cinema cameras, it is often preferable to achieve a look that is more “cinematic” than “digital.” No one factor creates a filmic feel, but the precedent is simple enough — film itself. The emulation of emulsion may depend on anything from lens choice and lighting to grading and grain plug-ins, but there is one sure-fire way to get a true film look: using film. Celluloid acquisition may be beyond the budget of your shoot, but using a “film intermediate” process — that is, transferring color corrected digital footage out to film, then scanning back to digital — could be one technique for splitting the difference. A webinar with VFX artist & colorist Jerome Thelia details just such a process, regarding the Oscar-winning short film Curfew. Read on for details. More »

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Panavision Primo VIn the past few weeks we’ve talked multiple times about high-end cinema lenses. First, we shared a brief comparison of the Zeiss Compact Zooms and Arri-Zeiss Ultra/Master Primes. Then last week, we talked about Cooke lenses and why the “Cooke Look” is so desirable to filmmakers. However, there’s one major brand of high-end cinema lenses that hasn’t gotten much NFS love yet, and that brand is Panavision. That trend is about to change, though, because Panavision just released their Primo V series of lenses, which just so happen to be the first cinema lenses designed specifically for large sensor, high-resolution digital cinema cameras. Read on to see what these lenses are all about. More »

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Nikon Df Silver with 50mm LensToday was the unveiling of the not-so-secret Nikon Df (digital fusion) DSLR. While many are calling the design “retro,” Nikon has really gone back to what made shooting photos easier: physical dials. Not everyone is pleased, but the goal for the company was to make a product that attempted to remove the barrier between the photographer and the photography, something that film cameras arguably did by being simple mechanical devices. As a part of the strategy, however, Nikon has also gone against the grain and removed all video features from the camera. But if a Japanese camera company is willing to release a ‘fusion’ photography camera, where’s the ‘fusion’ digital cinema camera? More »

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img-dj-spooky-1_09501789140IFP Film Week wrapped up Thursday with a keynote by DJ Spooky, marking the end to the Filmmaker Conference, Project Forum and Festival Forum for which worldwide creators converged at the Lincoln Center over the past five days. The week brought together industry veterans with first-time filmmakers in a series of panels densely packed back to back. Though some regretted that the conference frequently seemed to skirt issues dealing with the inequities built into the industry, those able to afford or steal a pass found certain key ideas exchanged worth the several-hundred-dollar ticket price. Read on for our top five takeaways. More »

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Llewyn Davis Holding a CatWe know that motion picture film is going to stick around for a while on a large scale thanks to Kodak, but what happens when the biggest directors and DPs choose not to use it anymore? Is that when we’ll stop seeing it in theaters? In a recent interview with the New York Times, Joel and Ethan Coen discussed not only their newest film, Inside Llewyn Davis, but how technology and the industry have changed since they started making films. More »

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Black Betty camopside

The brand new camera design is in the open (You guys are good!). Black Betty is much more than a camera. It’s a complete cinema solution utilizing an Apple Mac Mini computer with a Silicon Imaging SI-2K Mini for the imager. It also happens to be the first single unit camera in existence capable of shooting, editing, and posting footage online, without the need for any other hardware. More »

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Mystery Digital Cinema CameraWhile cameras are just tools to facilitate a vision, very often we forget that usability can be just as important as image quality. Well-designed cameras let you forget about the tool and focus on making beautiful imagery. Unfortunately, that seems to have been lost in the current age of digital cinema, and we have plenty of designs that leave a lot to be desired, often requiring all sorts of gadgets to make them useful. Tomorrow we’re going to unveil a brand new digital cinema camera that was designed with all of this in mind, marrying form and function to get out of your way and let you make images. You can check out the first sneak peek below. More »

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light iron michael cioni post production color correction grading dit digital imaging technician lily pad outpost todailies app film filmmakingA few weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend the grand opening of Light Iron’s New York facility. I met very nice, dedicated, hard-working (and patient!) people there, and got a chance to hear words from Michael Cioni, the post company’s CEO. I also got a chance to scratch the surface of some of Light Iron’s infrastructure — including its LILY PAD DIT station — which aims to empower the on-set technician, and crew as a whole, with a seamless media experience. In addition to the hardware, this experience is supercharged by the likes of Light Iron’s custom Todailies app, which will receive an upcoming upgrade as well. More »

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Noah Baumbach Frances HaNoah Baumbach is a filmmaker whose character-driven narratives often find great depth out of simplicity, and his latest film Frances Ha pushes that sensibility even further. Shot digitally in black and white and lensed by Sam Levy, Baumbach notoriously did thirty or forty takes for many scenes in the film, in the hopes of finding “the one shot that tells the story.” Marc Maron recently gave an excellent podcast interview with Baumbach, going in-depth about his previous films, his path to becoming a filmmaker and his approach to creating a contemporary digital black and white film with Frances Ha. Hit the jump for the audio interview and watch the scene that took 42 takes. More »

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Just a few short months ago, it was announced that the Blackmagic Cinema Camera would be receiving a Micro 4/3 lens mount option alternative to its original Canon EF mount. Granted, for those of us still waiting on the BMCC to ship, a few short months is no stretch of time to merely shrug off — particularly when the mount announced was to be a “passive” or “dumb” one, meaning electronic control would not be supported for smart MFT lenses. There’s been speculation that this would change — and given Blackmagic’s recent addition to the consortium of companies aligned with the official Micro 4/3 standard, this speculation seems less outlandish than ever. More »

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Film is going the way of other elegant, exotic, but evolutionarily condemned creatures such as the Tasmanian Tiger, the Dodo bird, and the Macarena. Somehow chart the decline of film use against the rise of digital and you’ll hear a lot about ‘how to make digital look like film’ in your research. It’s almost an existential crisis for shooters of our transitional generation, and the heart of digital’s identity crisis. If film is the look of cinema, what’s the key ingredient? Resolution? Latitude — or worse, light response curve? Motion transfer? Color reproduction? Or should we just let “the digital look” evolve into its own beast altogether? That’s a lot of heavy questions for a Sunday afternoon read, but ones unavoidably raised by a post from Art Adams of Pro Video Coalition about the wide open lensed and low light look of ’80′s and ’90′s films. More »

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By coincidence or not, it seems like each camera announced to use CinemaDNG as its RAW shooting format is poised to change the world in its own way. The Blackmagic Cinema Camera and the ~$3K Digital Bolex D16 seek to put quality acquisition tools in nearly anyone’s hands, while the future-bound Aaton Penelope Delta and open source Apertus Axiom bear their own technical notabilities (and nobilities). Clearly it’s time to really start wondering about CinemaDNG. As of now, the license-free format is being adopted by way more cameras than NLEs, and workflow questions, concerns, and schools of thought and technique abound. There’s hope and then some, though — just over the horizon the RAW processing software shipping with the Digital Bolex D16 just might change the world in its own way, too. More »

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Ever wondered what format, camera model, lens type, finishing format, lens manufacturer, etc. was used to create a certain film? You may have found yourself punching in IMDb as your default movie trivia database, and you may have found some or all such information in the film’s technical specs page — or you may not have. While IMDb has a lot of other coverage to keep itself occupied logging (particularly cast and crew lists), you may find yourself wanting a more detailed and dedicated technical breakdown — enter ‘ShotOnWhat?More »

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If you’ve noticed off-hand that the world — and particularly that of cinema — has been missing a little bit of a beloved strangeness recently, there’s a possibility that’s because David Lynch hasn’t made a feature film since 2006′s MiniDV-shot Inland Empire. He’s been active (and acting, in several cases) in media of other kinds, and directed a 2010 promotional short for Dior, but I for one have found myself wondering what exactly has been stopping him from a return to the big screen. Thanks to a recent interview with Lynch by the Hollywood Reporter, we now know his opinion on the internet and the digital future of film, plus answers to the question my title poses both in the spiritual and literal sense. More »

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We live in a time of unparalleled choice. The number and types of high-powered tools of our trade has never been this great, nor have advancements and price thereof been in such aggressive opposition to each other before. We’re definitely at the midpoint of a truly glacial shift – that’s glacial in magnitude, not time elapsed — and we’re all pretty well aware of the technology available to us. Something we don’t get to hear about half as often, though, is what the men and women in the creative realm most directly tied to this technology, cinematography, have to say about it, or their view of the brave new world in which we all work and strive to remain relevant. Film and Digital Times has just posted some fantastic pamphlets of short essays written by a number of working cinematographers, and the perspectives within are a must-read. More »

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This is an interesting item – Ikonoskop, the folks behind the A-Cam dII (a raw shooting HD camera previously covered) recently announced a black and white version – the A-Cam dII Panchromatic.  By using a monochrome sensor, it aims to give folks looking for great black and white footage a new option with “an amazing range of gradations”.  Want to see some sample footage?  Check this out: More »