» Posts Tagged ‘directing’

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Richard LinkaterRichard Linklater is a DIY filmmaker hero for many reasons. He’s self-taught, completely obsessed with cinema and making films, and his approach to telling stories is one that I think many can relate to. And if you were just thinking about what an experience it would be to actually be able to sit in a room and pick his brain about all of this, you’re in luck. Linklater answers a bunch of questions from a small group of folks for one of Fox Searchlight’s Searchlab lectures, which gives us an inside look into how the director goes about writing screenplays, rehearsing with actors, and working on-set. More »

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Paul GreengrassAt first glance, this BAFTA lecture from Captain Phillips director, Paul Greengrass on iconic director David Lean, might seem like a simple nod to an individual career — a legendary one, but individual nonetheless. However, as Greengrass’ speech goes on, it becomes a more of a soliloquy about the life of a director —  the choices that ones has to make in order to be and continue to be one. It’s really a beautiful and powerful lecture with plenty of helpful information about the craft of filmmaking (and David Lean, too!), so continue on to check it out. More »

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I don’t know about you, but I’m always frustrated when I get excited about a good movie at a festival, only to see the film descend into the bowels of obscurity after distribution dead-ends. Why is it so hard for anyone but a handful of good independent films to make their way onto my screen at home? After a year of hard work, I am excited to see the atmospheric, underdog film Hide Your Smiling Faces finally making it somewhere. Around this time last year, director Daniel Patrick Carbone sat down with No Film School over Skype. Checkout our original interview below, and find out where you can download the film now! More »

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David O Russell American Hustle DirectingWhile David O. Russell and American Hustle were nominated for 10 Academy Awards, they came home empty-handed on Oscar night. Most of those involved with the film are no stranger to nominations, but it’s the work involved that gets them even remotely near the statuettes in the first place. In this terrific behind the scenes video for American Hustle, learn how David O. Russell and the rest of the crew approached their work on the film, and what it takes to put together a movie of this caliber. More »

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Akira Kurosawa(Answer: Everything!) Akira Kurosawa is in a league of his own. To master filmmakers, like Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and Oliver Stone, he was the teacher, and often shared his knowledge with those who asked. Flavorwire has published a few pieces of said knowledge in the form of Kurosawa’s greatest filmmaking quotes — ones that beautifully answer questions about the craft, advise us on storytelling, and remind us why we fell in love with cinema in the first place. More »

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Alfonso Cuaron BAFTABAFTA LA recently sat down with director Alfonso Cuarón for their Behind Closed Doors series, in which he answered questions surrounding everything from his childhood love of classic cinema to the motivation behind the choices he made on Gravity. It’s a rare look into not only an Academy Award-winning director’s life, but into a career that is marked with great boldness, mastery — and an expulsion from film school. Listen to Cuarón  share about his childhood discovery of films, turbulent years in film school, and his current approach to filmmaking after the jump. More »

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SpielbergAs he is arguably the most successful Hollywood director of all time, it should surprise no one that, even as a teenager, Steven Spielberg was a prodigy. Like many kids of his generation, he used a Super 8 camera to make short films; unlike most of them, he had a preternatural knack for filmmaking, and, at the age of 17, wrote and directed a 135-minute sci-fi epic, Firelight. Click below to read the story of Spielberg’s first (and extremely indie) foray into feature filmmaking, and watch the surviving footage! More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Steven Soderbergh Dissing his Own Movie - No Film SchoolSteven Soderbergh, who has “retired from directing,” has produced a number of films inside and outside the studio system, but regardless of the way any of them are funded, he is usually trying to challenge himself in some way with each movie he makes — except when he didn’t early on in his career. In a new interview with Criterion about the release of his film King of the Hill, Soderbergh disses one of his earlier films, The Underneath, and takes full responsibility for being mentally absent during the making of that movie. Check out the clip below (NSFW language): More »

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Sam MendesSam Mendes, director of films like American Beauty and Skyfall, has made it a habit of working with some of the best people in the industry, and has turned out some truly memorable films. He has also heavily invested himself in theater, and continues working in that medium to this day. Mendes was honored at the spring gala for the Roundabout Theatre Company, and at the end of the ceremonies, gave some advice to current and aspiring directors. More »

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Taxi DriverStudying films, whether they’re poorly or masterfully made, is one of the greatest ways you can educate yourself about how (not) to make a film. Martin Scorsese’s masterfully made Taxi Driver has been studied time and time again by experts, students, and enthusiasts, but in this 1999 documentary about the making of the film, we get to hear from the filmmakers themselves, including Scorsese, screenwriter Paul Schrader, DP Michael Chapman, editor Tom Rolf, the cast, and even legendary makeup artist Dick Smith, who explain in great detail how Taxi Driver came to be. Continue on for a few key takeaways from the doc. More »

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Barry LyndonIt has been fifteen years to the day since one of the greatest filmmakers to ever walk the planet unfortunately departed from it. Stanley Kubrick, who demonstrated his impeccable storytelling abilities in films like 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, and many others, died on this day back in 1999, and what better way to acknowledge the empty place the legendary auteur left in the cinematic world after his death than with a celebration of how he managed to give his films such presence during his life. Continue on to watch a video tribute to the late director that shines a light on his brilliant signature themes and cinematic techniques. More »

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Jack LemmonActor Jack Lemmon offered his talent in some of the most iconic comedies in cinematic history, including Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, and of course, The Odd Couple. Needless to say, he acquired a wealth of wisdom in a career that spanned over half a century, and now thanks to filmschoolthrucommentaries, we get to listen in as Lemmon shares some great insight into one of his most compelling, dramatic roles, Shelley Levene in Glengarry Glen Ross, as well as what it was like working with the film’s writer, David Mamet. More »

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Despite the name of our website, there are many things to be learned in film school, and director Addison Mehr chose an especially interesting project for his NYU thesis film. Fort Apache is the story of small town escape, adapted from a popular short story by Alan Heathcock. Click through to watch the film and get Addison’s perspective on film school, reaching out to an established author, casting and finding stories that resonate. More »

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David DobkinWhat is the funniest movie you’ve ever seen? Do you lean towards the slapstickiness of a Farrelly Bros. flick, or do you prefer Wes Anderson’s boarding school style of humor? There are all types and styles of comedy, but one thing they have in common, other than being laugh-inducing, is that those laughs were hard-won. Writing and directing comedy is not easy, despite how effortlessly people respond to it, and if you’re in need of a little guidance, check out this article Wedding Crashers director David Dobkin wrote for the Directors Guild of America: his 10 Commandments of Directing Comedy. More »

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CasinoWhen a director as capable as Martin Scorsese makes a film, every one of its dimensions offers so much in terms of education. The editing, cinematography, use of sex and violence, and storytelling in his films have been studied before on NFS, but if you’re looking to add a new dimension to your Scorsese expertise, take a second to check out two separate video essays that explore the director’s representations of women by cutting together scenes from each of his films. More »

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Moonrise KingdomThere are very few filmmakers working today whose films are so heavily marked by their DNA, so much so that they’re recognizable to cinephiles and casual moviegoers alike. One of these filmmakers is Wes Anderson. Most people know a Wes Anderson movie when they see it; the distinguishing color palette, signature camera moves, the many, many overhead shots, but there is much, much more to be said about his visual themes. Nelson Carvajal peeks inside the director’s imaginative world in this excellent video that showcases some of Anderson’s best films, as well as voiceovers from interviews with the director in which he talks about his artistic sensibilities. More »

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The 2014 Academy Awards are now exactly two weeks away, which means advertisements, TV spots, interviews, and talk show appearances featuring nominated films and their actors are reaching their seasonal apices. But over at Keyframe, they’ve put together a video that pits each Best Director nominee against each other in a fight to see which one is most deserving of the Oscar. Continue on to take a closer look at the directorial styles, performances, and artistic approaches of some of the most talented directors working today. More »

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PsychoIt’s one of the most famous scenes in cinematic history. Almost everybody recognizes it, even if they’ve never seen the movie. It’s the infamous shower scene in Psycho where Marion Crane is repeatedly stabbed by a mysterious individual. With a scene as iconic as that, who would guess that the question of who directed it would ever come up? It was Alfred Hitchcock — right? Well, maybe not. Both Hitchcock and famous graphic artist and title sequence designer Saul Bass claim to have directed the 7-day shoot, but maybe we don’t need to rely on mere hearsay. Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals sheds a little more light on the situation with a side by side comparison between Bass’ storyboards and the actual footage. More »

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Terminator SalvationDirector McG (3 Days to Kill) has lent his filmmaking talents to virtually ever major area in entertainment media. He has helmed high grossing films like Charlie’s Angels, produced wildly popular TV shows like Chuck, and made music videos for some of the biggest names in music. If you’re asking yourself how he does it, this article from MovieMaker Magazine might help to explain. Pulling from his nearly 20 years of filmmaking experience, McG has shared six “golden rules of moviemaking“. Check them out after the jump. More »

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Steve McQueenIf filmgoers didn’t know about Steve McQueen, surely they do now. Though 12 Years a Slave, nominated for Best Picture at this year’s Academy Awards, is McQueen’s most commercial film to date, it bares a striking resemblance to his two previous films Shame and Hunger – not necessarily in cinematography or subject matter, but in the way McQueen approaches “the body”. To understand exactly what that means, check out this 2-hour long conversation between the incredible director and chief curator of the Museum of Modern Art Stuart Comer, in which they discuss McQueen’s films, career, and artistic approach. More »