» Posts Tagged ‘directing’

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ScorseseCountless filmmakers set their stories and tripods down in New York to make their movies, but when I think about the filmmakers whose work encapsulates the unique heart and spirit of the city, two come immediately to mind: Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese. The object of Robert Kolodny’s affection, and the one for which he honors in a beautiful video tribute, is Queens-native Scorsese, whose entire career could be seen as a love relationship with the city played out on celluloid. In his three-minute video, Kolodny whisks us through New York, letting us peer through the eyes of the great director through his most celebrated work. More »

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Citizen KaneCitizen Kane: the #1 favorite film of 100% of freshman film school students and young lovers of cinema. (Remember Michael Scott’s nephew, Luke? Case in point.) Though the title of “greatest movie ever” is impossible to possess, Citizen Kane’s praises have become so commonplace that, unfortunately, some tend to take its cinematic command for granted — even though the film proved Orson Welles and famed cinematographer Gregg Toland to be real pioneers of the craft. Take a look at these incredibly insightful documentaries about the making of Welles’ masterpiece, and renew your appreciation for a truly groundbreaking piece of cinema. More »

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TheMaster_PaulThomasAndersonP.T. Anderson is a director who has worked within the Hollywood system for almost his whole career and yet managed to maintain an independent spirit exemplary of the sort of personal work typified by the best of indie cinema. He is also a director whose style has undergone a dramatic evolution since the relatively recent start of his career. We investigate some of the homages Anderson has paid to some of the greatest directors in cinematic history, like Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, and Mikhail Kalatozov, as well as his ever-evolving, maturing style. More »

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Akira KurosawaAkira Kurosawa is one of the most influential, as well as celebrated directors in all of cinematic history, especially when it comes to Japanese filmmaking. He was heavily involved in nearly ever aspect of his films’ production process, from co-writing scripts to editing (many considered editing the director’s greatest strength as a filmmaker). In this 90-minute documentary, A Message from Akira Kurosawa: For Beautiful Movies (2000), Kurosawa shares his unique insight in ten interviews that were conducted towards the end of his life, discussing screenwriting, shooting, cinematography, directing, and his “quest for making the perfect — ‘beautiful’ movie,” — definitely a masterclass in filmmaking from a filmmaking master. More »

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Gravity btsOctober belonged to director Alfonso Cuarón and his groundbreaking film Gravity. Not only did the film receive universal acclaim for its direction, cinematography, and sound, but it went on to be one of the highest grossing film of 2013, taking in over $650 million worldwide at the box office. Though some time has passed, putting a relieving wedge between us and a movie that forced us to reevaluate our lives as we hung, suspended in the darkness of our minds without the heavy gravitational pull of everyday distractions, the work that was done on the film is still as relevant as ever. The Wrap just uploaded a behind the scenes video that takes us on Gravity’s journey from script to screen. More »

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Coen BrothersNo one does dark comedy quite like the Brothers Coen. (A pregnant police chief coming upon a bleach-blonde criminal feeding his partner’s body through a wood chipper, a perfect mixture of ruthless violence and Minnesota nice, is something only they could pull off.) There has been quite a lot of buzz circulating about their latest film Inside Llewyn Davis, but Joel and Ethan’s filmmaking journey began back in 1984 with their critically acclaimed neo-noir Blood SimpleThis 1999 BBC documentary reaches back into the Coens’ past to discuss not only their early films (pre-O Brother, Where Art Thou), but the sensibilities that started before they ever said “action”. More »

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Michel GondryFilms have the ability to transport us into other worlds; sometimes those worlds bear a striking resemblance to the one we live in every day, and other times they dwell in the surreal. One of the greatest filmmakers to teeter his films along this line is Michel Gondry, director of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and The Science of Sleep, and his latest project, a documentary featuring modern philosopher Noam Chomsky, walks that same line. Gondry takes us behind the scenes in a video by The Creators Project and details how he utilized stop motion techniques to animate his conversation with the “father of modern linguistics.” More »

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kubrickIn early 1965, the New Yorker sent physicist and author Jeremy Bernstein to interview a then 37-year-old Stanley Kubrick at his New York apartment. The piece went so well that in November, Bernstein was dispatched to Oxford, where Kubrick was in production on 2001: A Space Odyssey (then known as Journey Beyond the Stars). Kubrick and Bernstein bonded over chess, and the master director opened up in one of his most wide-ranging interviews. Now, the entire 76-minute Q&A is available online. From a man who gave precious few interviews, this is quite a treat for the Kubrick fan, and covers a wide range of topics, from chess, to nuclear war, and space travel. Continue on to check it out! More »

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Richard LinklaterVery few filmmakers manage to capture the very essence of cinema, the definition of which has tortured the minds of so many great classical film theorists. Is it art? Is it reality? Is it expression? Is it impression? To me, its essence is time. BFI’s Sight and Sound beautifully ponders director Richard Linklater’s romance with cinema and time in a short video essay, which reflects on the temporal bond of his films, which are less sequential still images of captured light than poetic soliloquies about existence, about life — about time. More »

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Film Meets Art Christopher NolanFilmmakers draw their inspiration from absolutely everywhere — every experience they’ve had, place they’ve been, song they’ve heard. For some, obscure historical events triggers their creativity, while for others, it could be a simple photograph — the title character from Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, Max Fischer, was inspired by a photo by Jacques Henri Lartigue. The Tate Gallery in London has launched a fascinating series of videos entitled “Film meets Art” that asks prominent U.K. directors about which works of art from famous painters have inspired their films. More »

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THR Breathrough PerformancesIt’s always a treat when the greatest directors in the industry, from Scorsese to Jarmusch, offer up their wisdom and insight about filmmaking to independent filmmakers. However, another great pool of knowledge comes from the ones great directors direct — the actors. For The Hollywood Reporter’s sixth panel they bring together six of the years’ most exciting actors for their Breakthrough Performers Panel, in which they share how they grew as artists, as well as what directors can do to help them rise to the occasion. More »

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Directors RoundtableIf there was ever a wall on which to be a fly — every year The Hollywood Reporter brings together some of the biggest directors for their Directors Roundtable. This year, Steve McQueen, Paul Greengrass, David O. Russell, Ben Stiller, Alfonso Cuarón, and Lee Daniels sit down for a discussion with Matt Belloni and Stephen Galloway, discussing everything from their latest films to how they deal with challenging situations they face on-set. There are many useful nuggets of wisdom scattered throughout the nearly hour-long video, so continue on to take a look. More »

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Jane CampionSo many great filmmakers got their start directing short films: Martin Scorsese made several well-received shorts while at NYU, David Lynch’s shorts contain the same unsettling DNA as his features, and Paul Thomas Anderson’s pre-Boogie Nights Dirk Diggler first existed in short film form. Jane Campion is no different. Her shorts demonstrate the dark humor and visual style, especially the ones she made while studying at the Australian Film and Television School in the 1980s — 3 of which Cinephilia and Beyond has compiled and shared. Continue on to check out these noteworthy shorts. More »

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Mike NewellWith nearly 50 years of experience in the entertainment industry, director Mike Newell surely has plenty to say and plenty to share in terms of how to make and keep making films. Newell has helmed a variety of different genres, from Donnie Brasco to Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fireand one of the most important lessons he shares in an article for MovieMaker Magazine is how to obtain an unwavering resolve when times get tough while making your film — no matter what the genre. More »

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Steven SoderberghSteven Soderbergh is that real rarity; a filmmaker who can manage a multi-million dollar George Clooney franchise, then turn around and make a movie for about $30 (give or take.) His ability to straddle the line between Hollywood and indie has put him in an enviable position, and this is a man who has had enough ups and downs in his career to last most filmmakers two or three lifetimes. Cinephilia and Beyond put together a compilation of his best DVD commentary tracks and discussions, and they are well worth a listen. Click below to check them out. More »

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Federico FelliniThe term “master filmmaker” gets thrown around quite a bit, but I can say without hyperbole that Italian director Federico Fellini is in fact a master filmmaker. With so many classics to his name, including his masterpiece 8 1/2 (1963), which covers subject matter that is often thought to be impossible to do well, making a film, the flamboyant director has become one of the most celebrated filmmakers of all time. His cinematic worlds of good-natured fools, early neorealist screenplays, and carnivalesque studies of society and human nature, blend and war to form the universe in which Fellini’s unique sensibilities abide. More »

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Wim WendersOne of the first films I ever saw in college that truly blew me away was Wim Wenders’ Wings of Desire.  The aesthetic, the contrasting B&W to color, everything about this film solidified to a very young, very trepidatious me the path on which I had already embarked upon. This German-born director opened up a world of poetic and lyrical filmmaking, and shared 50 “Golden Rules” with MovieMaker Magazine that are almost as beautifully and enigmatically communicated as his films. Continue on to read a selection. More »

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film ltk links tutorials knowledge filmmaking camera shooting cinematography tips tricks directingLast year, NFS readers heard from Tobias Deml when he did something awesome — rigging an Android tablet not only as a Canon DSLR monitor, but also a touch-screen controller. Now, Toby has shared something even more awesome. Over the course of a year or so, he thought it may be useful to compile an organized list of filmmaking links on everything from shooting to rigging to costuming to distributing. The result is FILM LTK — standing for links, tutorials, and knowledge — and useful it most understatedly is. For Toby’s breakdown of over 250 links to all things filmmaking, check below. More »

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David LeanBritish filmmaker David Lean was an epic director in more ways than one. Not only did he become known for his epic films, like Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago, but his incredible renown for his cinematic excellence has spanned decades. But, perhaps more epic than his films and reputation was his grand approach to filmmaking. An inspiring look into the director’s life on set in the BBC Four short documentary, David Lean and his Dedicated Maniacs, reveals just how far one would go to exercise his passion for cinema. More »

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GRAVITYWith the remarkable commercial and critical success of his latest film, GravityAlfonso Cuarón, the Mexican filmmaker who became widely known to international audiences with his 2001 film Y Tu Mamá Tambiénseems poised to reach a new level of success. With his frequent collaborator, DP Emmanuel Lubezki, Cuarón has worked in almost every genre of film while still maintaining a unique cinematic sensibility. A remarkable new video shows Cuarón’s magical use of cinematic technique, and it is definitely worthwhile viewing for all movie-lovers. Click below to learn more about Cuarón and check it out! More »