» Posts Tagged ‘director’

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loves of a cyclops francis-viewmaster-01

A short film can be just that: a short glimpse into a world of the filmmaker’s creation. But then there are those short films that come with a medium-spanning world for audiences to explore far longer than the last frame of the film. One such successful transmedia project is Nathan Punwar’s Loves of a Cyclops, where the viewer can enter a nonsensical world with enough supporting material (film strips, recordings, and photographs) to make you wonder if Cycloptics might just be possible. No Film School sat down with Punwar to talk about anything from the rewards of transmedia to how Pixar just might look into multidimensional cycloptic viewing. More »

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Bastards of Young Taking a break on set

Through film history, there are those films we qualify as good “party movies” (Sixteen Candles and Dazed and Confused come to mind). But on the low-budget end of the spectrum, scenes taking place at a party can sometimes be the surest way for a film to scream “amateur”. Is it the garish lighting that accompanies party scenes, or the awkward clusters of bored friends posing as background actors? Josiah Signor tackled the party genre with much success in Bastards of Young, and in this No Film School interview, he explains how he created his well acted, well paced, nuanced feature debut — a micro budget “party movie” that’s actually pretty damned good. More »

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Film Director

The other day, I overheard someone say that Steve McQueen’s cinematography in 12 Years A Slave was brilliant. As a huge fan of Sean Bobbitt (the actual cinematographer of that film), I wanted to say something, but held my tongue because avoiding the argument that would have ensued seemed like a better option. Despite my inaction, this instance got me thinking about our shared cultural view of film directors, and about whether or not that view needs to change. More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Kevin Smith Talks About the Things You Can't Learn in Film School - No Film SchoolWhile this website might be called No Film School, we have always acknowledged that there are positives and negatives for attending or not attending film school. The mission that hasn’t changed since the site was created is to provide as much daily inspiration, knowledge, and news as possible on all sorts of topics related to filmmaking and shooting video, and this next clip is no different. Writer/director Kevin Smith, a film school dropout himself, talked during a Q&A about whether going to film school is worth it, and the skills that really can’t be taught in school. More »

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Curtains by Tyler T Williams

Budgets are rapidly coming down for music videos, but some directors still manage to execute their visions on a budget. Tyler T. Williams is perhaps one of the best at this, always putting together interesting images with great music. With his latest video for “Curtains!?” by Timber Timbre, Tyler displays a growing confidence in storytelling and a welcome throwback to the film noir grunge of the 40s and 50s. Hit the jump to watch the new video and for our interview with the director. More »

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Vincent Laforet Directing Motion

The Directing Motion Tour workshop, hosted by award-winning commercial director Vincent Laforet, goes in-depth with some of the most famous films in history, analyzing why and when the camera was moved or placed in a certain way, and how sequences are constructed from those shots. Not only that, but attendees actually get to work on a scene themselves where they put all of this theory into practice. I recently attended the DM tour, and I was able to sit down with Vincent and ask a few questions about camera movement, being a director, and what really matters when it comes to storytelling. More »

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Directing Motion Tour 2014 Vincent LaforetAs a director or cinematographer, knowing how and when to move the camera is an extremely important skill, and it’s something that takes a lot of practice to get better at. One way to get a better sense of how camera movement can affect a scene is to dissect what the greatest directors and directors of photography have done with their films. That’s partly what commercial director Vincent Laforet is doing with his Directing Motion Tour, which starts on May 6th. He’s uploaded a snippet of some of the things he’ll be covering during the workshop — here is a coverage breakdown of a scene from Empire of the Sun, directed by Steven Spielberg and shot by Allen Daviau: More »

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Godzilla Director Gareth Edwards AdviceGareth Edwards, who you might know from his very DIY film Monsters, is back with another monster film, Godzilla. While he’s got quite a bit more money to spend on this project than the last ($160 million versus Monsters which was made for under $1 million), the basic aspects of filmmaking are no different, and regardless of budget, it still takes the same discipline. Gareth, who has been in VFX most of his career, has been working towards his goal of becoming a director from a very early age, and shares some fantastic advice to all filmmakers: More »

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David O Russell American Hustle DirectingWhile David O. Russell and American Hustle were nominated for 10 Academy Awards, they came home empty-handed on Oscar night. Most of those involved with the film are no stranger to nominations, but it’s the work involved that gets them even remotely near the statuettes in the first place. In this terrific behind the scenes video for American Hustle, learn how David O. Russell and the rest of the crew approached their work on the film, and what it takes to put together a movie of this caliber. More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Steven Soderbergh Dissing his Own Movie - No Film SchoolSteven Soderbergh, who has “retired from directing,” has produced a number of films inside and outside the studio system, but regardless of the way any of them are funded, he is usually trying to challenge himself in some way with each movie he makes — except when he didn’t early on in his career. In a new interview with Criterion about the release of his film King of the Hill, Soderbergh disses one of his earlier films, The Underneath, and takes full responsibility for being mentally absent during the making of that movie. Check out the clip below (NSFW language): More »

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Sam MendesSam Mendes, director of films like American Beauty and Skyfall, has made it a habit of working with some of the best people in the industry, and has turned out some truly memorable films. He has also heavily invested himself in theater, and continues working in that medium to this day. Mendes was honored at the spring gala for the Roundabout Theatre Company, and at the end of the ceremonies, gave some advice to current and aspiring directors. More »

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Ingmar Bergman CriterionWe’ve talked a lot about influential filmmakers from the past and present, but haven’t really talked much about one of this writer’s favorite directors: Ingmar Bergman. Few filmmakers have been able to put together such an impressive body of work, and keep doing it well into their later years. Not every film was a masterpiece (far from it), but every single one had a piece of the filmmaker deeply ingrained in it. That idea is explored in the Criterion Collection video essay embedded below: More »

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Martin Scorsese 2013 Jefferson LectureMartin Scorsese is a great film director, but as this segment shows, he’s also very well spoken and passionate about the history, mystery, and power of cinema. Scorsese’s 2013 Jefferson Lecture, entitled Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema, goes into detail about the birth of cinema, the first films that made him want to become a director, and helps answer the question: what’s so special about movies? Hit the jump to listen to an excerpt of his speech, curated by NPR, where he explores the impact of the inciting moment and why light and movement are so important to us: More »

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Jack Perez - Movies to Learn CraftDirector Jack Perez (Some Guy Who Kills PeopleMega Shark vs. Giant Octopushas been making low-budget films for quite some time, and just a few months ago he sat down with the great people over at Film Courage to discuss the process of making movies and which are the best films to watch to help you learn the craft of filmmaking. Check out the list below, and be sure to head on down to the comments and add any that have helped you learn the craft. More »

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12 Year Old Director Trinity Anderson nofilmschool

Trinity Anderson is barely 12 years old and she makes me feel like I’m slacking: she knows how to operate a steadicam, has been animating for years, and just finished a successful kickstarter for her short called Me and Ewe. Seriously? I’m pretty sure at 12 years old all I did was play tetherball and draw really awful stick figure cartoons. (Come to think of it, not much has changed.) Trinity was ever-so-kind enough to sit down for a video interview with NFS to talk about anything from her Dragonframe stop-motion software, to her thoughts on gender equality in the movie biz. More »

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Acclaimed Japanese director Akira Kurosawa would have been 103 years old this coming March 23rd, and in honor of his birthday, Criterion Collection is making 24 of his films absolutely free to watch on Hulu through Sunday, March 24th. It’s more than that, however, as they are making available some interviews with people like George Lucas and Robert Altman talking about Kurosawa’s films, and a documentary about the origins and influences of The Seven Samurai. Click through to check those out embedded below. More »

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Writer/Director Harmony Korine started out his filmmaking journey as a teenager, penning the screenplay for the 1995 breakout film Kids when he was just 19 years old. With his most recent release Spring Breakers, Korine continues to destroy expectations and come into his own as an innovative and radical filmmaker. In this short clip from Tumblr’s new editorial feature project Storyboard, Korine talks about his process and what it means for him to be a self-described ‘solider of cinema.’ Check it out after the jump. More »

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Edward Burns, director of Nice Guy Johnny, Newlyweds, and most recently The Fitzgerald Family Christmas, is utilizing social media not only to get in touch with his fan base about all sorts of topics related to filmmaking, but also get his films out to his audience without spending money on advertisement. He’s even trying to get input from his Twitter followers on his upcoming film project. Recently he sat down with Sheri Candler to talk about making and distributing films for little money outside of the studio system, and we’ve got the second part of that interview below: More »

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Edward Burns, director of Nice Guy Johnny and Newlyweds (his newest is The Fitzgerald Family Christmas), has been around independent filmmaking for nearly 20 years, and he always seems to find new ways of reinventing himself and figuring out different ways to tell stories that matter to him. The great thing about the DSLR revolution is that it has put professional-looking images within reach of almost anyone. You can now spend a few hundred dollars on a camera and it will get you quite a bit of the way there, and let you focus on everything else to make the best movie possible. In an interview with Sheri Candler, and in the online Q&A session below, Edward Burns talks about his career, low-budget filmmaking, screenwriting, and how it’s possible to make movies cheaply. More »

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Directing is not easy work, especially if you’ve never done it before. It’s easy to say “action” and “cut,” but everything that happens after a take can be just as important as what happens during a take. So what should you be doing once a take is finished? Director Patrick Tucker, who has been at the helm for more than 400 broadcast TV episodes, recently gave some advice about what a director should do after saying “cut.” More »