» Posts Tagged ‘directorofphotography’

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Ronny MullerWhen talking about influential cinematography, it’s impossible not to talk about Dutch cinematographer Robby Müller. His style is as distinct as those of the famed directors he has formed long-time collaborations with, like Wim Wenders and Jim Jarmusch. His approach to photographing a film begins with understanding its meaning, creating emotional and cerebral connections between the narrative and the visuals, and ultimately, the film and its audience. Cinephilia and Beyond has shared an interview Müller, in which he talks about working on Down By Law, that serves more as a masterclass in cinematography. Continue on to check it out. More »

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sean bobbittThese days, there aren’t many DPs doing more inspired work than Sean Bobbitt. From his absolutely stunning collaborations with British artist Steve McQueen (of which 12 Years A Slave is the most recent), to his work with masterful filmmakers like Derek Cianfrance and Neil Jordan, Bobbitt has defined one of the most unique and compelling cinematic voices in recent memory. At last month’s Cameraimage festival in Poland, Bobbitt conducted a truly excellent hour and a half workshop about handheld camera operating. For camera operators and DPs alike, this is a must-see workshop. Check it out: More »

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thr cinematographer roundtableThe Hollywood Reporter has released another installment of their roundtable discussion series, this time with cinematographers from some of the biggest Hollywood films of the year. Barry Ackroyd, Sean Bobbitt, Bruno Delbonnel, Stuart Dryburgh, and Phedon Papamichael sit down to have a discussion about all things cinematographic, from what’s it’s like to be a DP, working with directors, and the transition from film to digital. Continue on to hear the discussion. More »

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DOP GIFLong hours spent looking through a camera or at a monitor, working with hot lights and troublesome lenses, constantly on your feet putting out fires in order to get a good shot — that’s just a day in the life of a cinematographer. You know what? DPs, like everyone else on-set, need to work hard, but they need to have a laugh, too. I came across the holy grail of on-set inside jokes — specifically for DPs — in the purest form of internet comedy (the GIF.) Continue on to check them out. More »

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Emmanuel LubezkiAlfonso Cuarón’s Gravity might just be one of the most technologically impressive films to ever see the light of day, and it’s certainly going to be a shoe-in for all major awards in the categories of cinematography and visual effects (and probably sound as well) come awards season. Last year, Claudio Miranda took home the cinematography oscar for his work on Life of Pi, and many were concerned that a film so heavily dependent on CGI couldn’t have proper cinematography in the traditional sense of the craft. However, Emmanuel Lubezki ASC, AMC (better known as Chivo) talked with David Heuring of American Cinematographer recently about the ever-evolving role of the cinematographer in the virtual age. What he had to say might surprise you. More »

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Let There Be Light DocMany new filmmakers spend a lot of time honing different crafts, such as screenwriting, camera operation, and editing. While those skills are important to develop, light and shadows are a large part of the foundation of filmmaking, and learning how to control light is one of the most important skills for filmmakers to learn. Check out Let There Be Light, a short documentary/tutorial (docutorial?) by Mark Vargo, a second unit DP who guides us quickly through the history of artificial lighting, the Inverse Square Law, different light fixtures, and how they are used in filmmaking. More »

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Gordon WillisOn the set of The Godfather, one of the biggest lighting “mistakes” in filmmaking became one of the most iconic cinematographic choices in film history. The decision to light Marlon Brando from the top, casting a complete shadow over his eyes, was that of master cinematographer Gordon Willis. He recently sat down with Craft Truck for an interview, discussing how he got his most famous shots, what it was like working with Francis Ford Coppola and Woody Allen, and what he thinks new cinematographers should avoid and pursue when starting out. More »

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Rachel MorrisonOne of the most talked about aspects of director Ryan Coogler’s Fruitvale Stationwhich won big at Cannes this year, is its subject matter — the film tells the true story of Oscar Grant who was shot by police in a Bay Area rapid transit station. However, the film’s cinematography has been said to capture the look, feel, and tone of needed to tell Oscar’s story. Director of Photography of the film, Rachel Morrison, shares with Filmmaker Magazine what techniques, gear, and thought process she utilized to achieve the gritty and realistic aesthetic that gave Fruitvale its authenticity. More »

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Timur CivanEverything in life has its purists. There are Mac purists and PC purists — vinyl purists and people who hate music (kidding.) In the filmmaking world, there are plenty of things to be a purist about, especially when it comes to cameras. (Canon and Nikon might as well be the Hatfields and McCoys.) But cameras, as well as almost every tool we use, have their advantages and disadvantages, and understanding which tools work best in certain situations is something that DP Timur Civan has learned to do. In a recent interview, Civan explains how making a decision on which camera to use depends less on prices or reviews, and more on the context of your material. More »

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From Wendy and Lucy to The RomanticsSam Levy’s work as a cinematographer is marked with naturalism and attention to character blocking. Here he sits down with Craft Truck to discuss his work, how he began as an assistant and lensed his first feature film on a standard def Mini DV camera. Hit the jump to learn more and to watch the full interview: More »

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Craft Truck brings us another great candid interview, this time with cinematographer Wolfgang Held. Wolfgang has shot countless films over the past 20 years, from documentaries, to commercials, to narratives. He is perhaps best know for his vérité work, ranging from the social labor of love Children Underground, to the cult Metallica doc Some Kind of Monster, to Bruno (whatever that is). Hit the jump to hear Wolfgang discuss vérité filmmaking in the digital age, his favorite focal lengths, and the undercover shenanigans of working with Sacha Baron Cohen: More »

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There was quite a bit of back and forth regarding the role of the DP on a recent post about Andrij Parekh, much to the surprise of myself and a few others. The DP is one of the most important people on a production. The real purpose of the last post was to hear from a working professional that the cinematographer has to be a collaborator and must serve the story. Now we’ve got another Craft Truck interview from Jeff Glickman, this time with Reed Morano, the director of photography on Frozen RiverIn the video below, Reed talks about her process and her career, and how she’s risen up through the ranks. More »

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There is no question the director of photography is one of the most important jobs on set. The DP helps the director set the look of the film, and depending on their working relationship, may actually have quite a bit of influence on the final film. In the end though, the DP’s job is to help the director get the movie “in the can” at all costs, even if that means sacrificing time for lighting and camera moves. Blue Valentine director of photography Andrij Parekh sat down with Craft Truck, a website that focuses on discussions with technical storytellers from the world of film, to talk about his career and how he sees the role of the cinematographer. More »