» Posts Tagged ‘directors’

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Moonrise KingdomThere are very few filmmakers working today whose films are so heavily marked by their DNA, so much so that they’re recognizable to cinephiles and casual moviegoers alike. One of these filmmakers is Wes Anderson. Most people know a Wes Anderson movie when they see it; the distinguishing color palette, signature camera moves, the many, many overhead shots, but there is much, much more to be said about his visual themes. Nelson Carvajal peeks inside the director’s imaginative world in this excellent video that showcases some of Anderson’s best films, as well as voiceovers from interviews with the director in which he talks about his artistic sensibilities. More »

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The 2014 Academy Awards are now exactly two weeks away, which means advertisements, TV spots, interviews, and talk show appearances featuring nominated films and their actors are reaching their seasonal apices. But over at Keyframe, they’ve put together a video that pits each Best Director nominee against each other in a fight to see which one is most deserving of the Oscar. Continue on to take a closer look at the directorial styles, performances, and artistic approaches of some of the most talented directors working today. More »

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Auteurs of ChristmasMost of us know what a Chris Columbus and John Hughes holiday looks like: a crazy midwestern family, pizza-sized pancakes, and ill-fated road trips along a blizzard-worn highway. Both of these filmmakers managed to capture the spirit of the winter festivities, but in an entertaining little short, Fourgrounds Media asks the question, “What would the holidays look like through the eyes of some of cinema’s greatest auteurs?” Continue on to check out their pretty spot on response. More »

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Film Meets Art Christopher NolanFilmmakers draw their inspiration from absolutely everywhere — every experience they’ve had, place they’ve been, song they’ve heard. For some, obscure historical events triggers their creativity, while for others, it could be a simple photograph — the title character from Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, Max Fischer, was inspired by a photo by Jacques Henri Lartigue. The Tate Gallery in London has launched a fascinating series of videos entitled “Film meets Art” that asks prominent U.K. directors about which works of art from famous painters have inspired their films. More »

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Federico FelliniThe term “master filmmaker” gets thrown around quite a bit, but I can say without hyperbole that Italian director Federico Fellini is in fact a master filmmaker. With so many classics to his name, including his masterpiece 8 1/2 (1963), which covers subject matter that is often thought to be impossible to do well, making a film, the flamboyant director has become one of the most celebrated filmmakers of all time. His cinematic worlds of good-natured fools, early neorealist screenplays, and carnivalesque studies of society and human nature, blend and war to form the universe in which Fellini’s unique sensibilities abide. More »

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Tarantino & SmithWhen thinking about the filmmakers that carried the torch for independent cinema in the 90s, the names that immediately come to mind are Quentin Tarantino and Kevin Smith (and Robert Rodriguez, of course.) Both directors offer great insight into what it means to man the helm of a film project, including the importance of communicating your vision, and what the job of a director is really all about. Continue on for this incredibly important video from filmschoolthrucommentaries. More »

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Scorsese Coppola from LIFE MagazineEvery once in a while the internet offers us a rare gem from the past, and today is one of those days. Circa 1997, Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola sat down with Geoffrey Gilmore, the then-director of the Sundance Film Festival to discuss their careers and their views on the future of filmmaking. Well, the future is here, and it’s cool to see that a couple of the century’s best filmmakers were spot on about the direction things are moving in. After the creative frenzy of the 70′s, described by Scorsese as “an atmosphere of making special movies,” United Artists collapsed. Maverick filmmakers like Scorsese and Coppola had to re-learn how to make movies, and on smaller budgets. Sound familiar? Hit the jump for the full 50-minute interview. More »