» Posts Tagged ‘dolly’

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Rigwheels Passport-Camera-DollyRigWheels showed off their new Passport Camera Dolly system at NAB, which takes flat mount and 75mm/100mm bowl mount tripods, and has the ability to completely fit inside one Pelican case. What might be most impressive for those who travel is the fact that the Passport Camera Dolly system comes in at 50 pounds, so it will go right into your checked baggage before a flight without any more fees. The system is now available for pre-order, and you can check out more details below. More »

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RigWheels PortaRail SystemWe’ve talked about some nifty gear from RigWheels before, but the thing that separates their gear from some other solutions is modularity. You can put together a dolly or camera mount with as little or as much of their gear as you’d like, and most of it can be adapted to other rigs you might already own. This year at NAB, we talked to Lance about the new PortaRail collapsible dolly/slider rail system. This system can fit inside one case and features 40″ long high-grade aluminum pipes that connect together seamlessly with threaded connectors. Check out the interview below: More »

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PortaRailWhether you’re a get-in-get-out filmmaker, or just someone who doesn’t want to lug around a big, awkward piece of gear, having portable tools  is a definite boon on any project, which is why RigWheel’s new rail system, PortaRail, which will be showcased at NAB, is such welcomed addition to their indie-focused line of motion and mounting products. These collapsible, DIY rails aim at offering an affordable camera movement solution that will allow you to set up, tear down, pack up, and go. More »

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Film Riot Camera MovementHere at No Film School, we talk a whole lot about fun new tools for creating camera movement. Whether it’s a slider, the latest variation on the gyroscopic gimbal, crazy jibs, or even the 100 foot technocrane, chances are that we’ve talked about it at some point. However, one thing that isn’t talked about nearly enough are the reasons and motivations behind adding camera movement to your films. But worry not, NFS brethren, because Ryan Connolly of Film Riot has a fantastic video just for people looking to move their cameras. Check it out. More »

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Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 1.21.44 PMThe dolly zoom, also referred to as the Vertigo effect or a Zolly shot, is a technique wherein the camera is dollied either forward or backward while the zoom on the lens is pulled in the opposite direction. When timed correctly, the effect of this technique is one in which the characters in the frame remain the same size while the foreground and background become compressed or de-compressed, depending on which direction the camera is traveling. It’s a technique that has been part of the cinematic language for almost 60 years, and as such, it has evolved over time. Our friend Vashi Nedomansky over at Vashi Visuals has put together a comprehensive look at the evolution of the dolly zoom, and it’s a fantastic watch, to say the least. More »

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sliderplus-v2-mediumHow do you make a slider smaller and more portable without losing travel distance? That’s exactly what edelkrone figured out how to do with their SliderPLUS, and they are now introducing a brand new version called the SliderPLUS V2 that aims to improve on many aspects of the original, while still providing small size and long travel. Check out some videos showing off the new V2 slider below, and if you order it or any other edelkrone items by today, there is free shipping worldwide. More »

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Rig Wheels 2.0-wide-2If you’ve been considering building your own DIY dolly rig, look no further. RigWheels, who has been producing dolly wheels and other accessories for the DIY-minded filmmaker, is introducing version 2.0 of their dolly wheels. The wheels make up the foundation for any good dolly/slider solution, and version 2.0 aims to give users better performance and handle heavier loads at no additional cost. Click through to check out more. More »

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Danny Dodge is a cameraman and cinematographer who has devised what may be the most light-weight and portable curved dolly track system you’ve ever seen. Searching for a way to build the ultimate portable dolly setup, Dodge stumbled upon the fact that a draw string could be used to arch PVC track to any degree he wished. The SnapTrack Cinerails rig was the result. Combining a simple draw string device with seven Cinerails gives you up to eight feet of curvable dolly track that seems primed for low-impact DSLR shooting, weighs under ten pounds, and breaks down/sets up in about a minute. Check out the SnapTrack Cinerails below, and some pre-ordering info if you’re interested. More »

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They’ve only just begun shipping the SliderPLUS+, but edelkrone has now unveiled the SliderPLUS XL, which takes everything that was good about the SliderPLUS+, and makes it even slidier. Whether you consider it (r)evolutionary or not, it’s a pretty ingenious concept, where you can take a relatively small device and get twice the movement out of it thanks to its design. Click through to learn more about it. More »

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There are a good deal of relatively inexpensive rigs out there that can help you achieve a nice dolly shot. For small-scale dollying you might use Cineskates, or for shots that require a greater amount of movement with larger subjects, you might go with Rigwheels. But there might be times when the size of your subject might make these tools — and even a full dolly track setup — inadequate for the job. But with a DSLR, some planning, and a little post work, you can put together a beautiful dolly shot of a tall building: More »

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Filmmaking equipment maker edelkrone recently unveiled their reinvented slider, the Slider PLUS+, and they showed off a brief animated clip giving you a sense of what it could do. Now we’ve got a real-life video of the slider in action with a DSLR, and the results are impressive for such a tiny device. Click through to check out the video. More »

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Edelkrone has announced their new slider invention that was hinted at a few days ago. The new device, called the Slider PLUS+, answers the question of portability without sacrificing length. I suggested that they may be introducing a slider that can be extended non-intrusively, and they’ve done that, but in a way that makes the rig one of the most portable options out there without hurting performance. Check out the introduction video: More »

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Sliders have been all the rage lately in the film world, and for good reason: they allow you to set up a dolly shot much faster than any traditional dolly and they can be leveled in seconds rather than minutes. Unfortunately, not all sliders are created equal, and many just can’t quite get perfectly smooth movements either because of cost-cutting, or because of engineering choices. Some have other problems related to portability. Edelkrone thinks they’ve solved one of the issues with sliders, and they are unveiling it on December 12 — and if you guess what it is correctly, you have a chance to win one of your very own mystery sliders. More »

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Pardon me as I step out of my quiet NFS screenwriter corner for a moment and don the NFS camera equipment hat (apparently, the virtual NFS offices are empty today with everyone else busy working on their own projects or traveling. Kinda eerily quiet). With that out of the way, here at NFS, we’ve recently posted a wide array of DIY dolly solutions, from the one already in your garage to sliders falling from outer space. The folks over at RigWheels have now expanded their product line to augment your DIY dolly systems. The new offerings from RigWheels not only make their slider wheels easier to use but also make cameras easier to mount on a variety of surfaces. More »

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You might already be thinking, yes, I use this already, or no, it’s far too dangerous and probably illegal where I live. Any of those things could very well be true, but a car can be very useful as a DIY dolly. I’ve utilized cars more times than I can remember just for this purpose, and they work great in a pinch or when a dolly would just be impractical. Even if you already know all of the benefits, there might be some ideas in this Vimeo Video School clip you haven’t thought of before: More »

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One of the most coveted DIY projects around (next to perhaps the jib) is the slider. However, DIY is usually a balance between cost savings and function, and this $10-$15 slider from Ryan Connolly at Film Riot is no different. Let’s take a look at how far you can stretch your dollar for a functional slider. Hit the jump for the tutorial: More »

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I’m sure many of you out there have some experience with DIY dollies and rigs, but this is an interesting design that incorporates some of the parts you may already have and makes the entire kit far more stable and useful. While this video is a bit older (and the parts may or may not cost $80 depending on what you get), it’s still a great idea and the potential for re-purposing equipment you’ve already bought is always enticing. This tutorial was sent over by DP Ryan E. Walters, who has contributed here before and happened to be the RED Epic shooter/technician on the recent Zacuto 2012 shootout. Check out the video below. More »

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One of the most consistent issues for filmmakers –especially those that travel a lot– is hauling around a lot of heavy gear (and for those of us on a budget, affording the gear we want to make great looking images). There have been some developments in making equipment more compact and cheaper, but this concept rig from designer Grant Parrinello, promises “a steadicam, boom camera (for high shots), a glide track (for smooth pan and push shots), a shoulder mount, and a tripod all into one compact, low cost product.” More »

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Have you been looking for a low-cost, easy to set up DIY dolly? Then you should definitely check out the tripod dolly that Justin Leyba of ImagineNow Entertainment whipped up using nothing more than a few furniture sliders. The results look rather impressive: More »

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Dynamic Perception has some interesting-looking micro-dolly/controller combos for sale, and they’ve demonstrated how to create moving, time-lapse, HDR videos using auto exposure bracketing on a Pentax K7. It’s not something you’ll need to do everyday, but if you ever need to create this very specialized shot, here’s how. More »