» Posts Tagged ‘editing’

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Premiere Black and WhiteBlack and white seems to be going through a resurgence of sorts. In the past year, a plethora of well-received black and white features have hit theaters, from Frances Ha to Nebraska, the cinematography of which we’ve talked about extensively. While there are multitudes of methods for capturing black and white images in camera, more often than not, modern films are shot in color and then converted to black and white in post processing. Unfortunately, many younger filmmakers think that the only way to accomplish this is through complete desaturation and maybe a boost in contrast. However, the infinite possibilities of our modern color tools open up a world of possibilities when it comes to black and white. Stick with us, and learn how to take creative control of your black and white inside of Premiere Pro. More »

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parallaxBack in November, we shared a great video tutorial by Joe Fellows that walked us through how to animate photos in After Effects by using the parallax 2.5D effect. Though the video received a warm response, there were a few questions raised, like how to stylize and texturize elements in the composition for example, which would in turn make the project look all the more profession and downright awesome. Fellows decided to make a follow-up tutorial that answers a few of those questions (some of which came right from NFS readers). Continue on to check out the video! More »

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macpro-2013-open-100058793-largeIn the past few weeks, we’ve covered the release and the early reports of the performance of the new Mac Pro extensively. From what we’ve seen to this point, it doesn’t seem like a stretch of the imagination to say that these machines will become fairly ubiquitous in the filmmaking world over the next year or two. However, there’s one aspect to this story that we haven’t yet covered, and that’s the economic debate of performance vs. price, especially in regards to people who use these machines as the foundation of their creative businesses. Our friend Chris Potter over at Screenlight (a video-sharing software for video pros) has written up a fantastic post about how to make the best economic decisions for your creative business as you look to purchase new hardware. More »

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Dede AllenAs David Lean said, “The editor is the final author of the film.” These days, with Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Avid, et al., the most indie, low-budget indie filmmaker has NLE options never before available, but prior to the mid-90s, every feature film was edited by hand. And, surprisingly for the “old-boys” world of Hollywood, many of films’ most prominent editors have been women. Of the old-school generation of female editors, perhaps no one exemplified the art better than Dede Allen, a trailblazer for editors like Martin Scorsese’s career-long editor, Thelma Schoonmaker. Continue on to hear some of your favorite filmmakers on the art of editing. More »

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Jordan and HollynTechnology is an important part of filmmaking, as well as something we like to talk about here at No Film School, but when it comes down to it, one, if not the, most integral part of our craft is storytelling. Editors and instructors Larry Jordan and Norman Hollyn forgo the “tech talk”, as they say, to delve into a conversation about the great influence film/video editing has in terms of telling stories, including ways certain edits can “guide” the viewer’s eye, attention, and emotional response to a scene. More »

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La JeteeFamed director David Lean once said that one should be able to cut any frame out of a roll of film and be able to frame it and hang it on the wall. There is great power in the still image. Seeing as most filmmakers will at one point use stills in their work (especially documentarians), it’d be a good idea to get a solid understanding of what a single frame can do. A video by Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals proves to be helpful by not only identifying several films that harness the power of still images (even carrying the weight of a full film), but by also offering a few tips on using them from an editor’s perspective . More »

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Akira KurosawaAkira Kurosawa is one of the most influential, as well as celebrated directors in all of cinematic history, especially when it comes to Japanese filmmaking. He was heavily involved in nearly ever aspect of his films’ production process, from co-writing scripts to editing (many considered editing the director’s greatest strength as a filmmaker). In this 90-minute documentary, A Message from Akira Kurosawa: For Beautiful Movies (2000), Kurosawa shares his unique insight in ten interviews that were conducted towards the end of his life, discussing screenwriting, shooting, cinematography, directing, and his “quest for making the perfect — ‘beautiful’ movie,” — definitely a masterclass in filmmaking from a filmmaking master. More »

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Editing Video editing is one of the more personal facets of filmmaking in that no two people do it exactly the same way. We all develop our own media workflows, our own ways of organizing projects, and we all cut differently. Unfortunately, sometimes the editing habits that we develop aren’t necessarily the best, and sometimes they’re just straight-up lazy and they don’t help us do our jobs to the best possible extent. Luckily, a new year is right around the corner, which means that it’s time to start making resolutions and to start working on giving up the bad editing habits that have been holding our work back. More »

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Apple’s release of the Final Cut Pro X 10.1 update came with a number of new features. From more 4K software and hardware support to better project and media management, FCP X’s new capabilities are many, and here to share his first impressions of the update is a filmmaker who has had extensive experience with the powerful NLE.

This is a guest post by Austin Mace. More »

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Hollywood Titles tutsNailing the opening title of your film is important for a number of reasons. Usually it’s the first thing your audience sees on-screen that introduces them to your story, which means that it has to capture its tone and prepare your viewers for what is about to unfold. They don’t necessarily have to be intricate undertakings (Lars von Trier’s simple opening title from Antichrist is probably one of my favorites), but if you want to learn techniques that will help you create something epic, Aetuts+ shares some tutorials that break down how to recreate the titles from some big Hollywood movies. More »

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Craft Truck In the Cut with Editor Lynzee KlingmanBy now we’re probably familiar with Craft Truck’s excellent interview pieces with cinematographers such as Andrij Parekh and Gordon Willis, but now they are bringing us a series focussing on the post-production heroes of cinema: the editors. Ever been tasked with turning 1.5 million feet of film into 12,000? Hit the jump to watch the interview with someone who did: laurel-studded editing legend Lynzee Klingman (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Man on The Moon). More »

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Still MotionOne of the post-production techniques I’ve yearned to know more about was animating still photos. We’ve seen this used in countless film intro sequences, and now motion graphics artist and director Joe Fellows shows us how to achieve this 3D effect in After Effects. By separating the background, mid, and foreground, you can animate your photos creating a parallax effect that will turn your simple 2D still images into moving 3D storytelling devices. Check out the tutorial after the jump. More »

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Resolve 10Last week, Blackmagic Design released version 10 of its world-renowned grading application, DaVinci Resolve. Beyond some of the more obvious enhancements that will benefit independent filmmakers, most notably the fact that the free version of Resolve now supports 4K content, the folks at Blackmagic have introduced some really astounding and innovative new features that are sure to make a difference in your color grading workflow. SpliceNPost, a New York post production house, has put together a comprehensive video overview of the best new features in Resolve 10. Check it out: More »

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ParallaxWhen I first started dabbling in After Effects and Flash several years ago, the first videos I made were simple animations (think cave drawings.) Not really knowing anything about layers or expressions made for interesting results when I tried to achieve the parallax effect — the illusion that objects move more quickly or slowly depending on how far away they are. Mikey Borup shares a tutorial that makes parallax scrolling a little bit easier. Continue on to watch the video: More »

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DaVinci Resolve 10 Now ShippingBlackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 10 finally entered public Beta back in September, and many of you have already begun using it for new projects. You can take version 9 projects into 10, but not the other way around, so starting something in 10 until today meant you were pushing forward with software that wasn’t quite complete yet (though stable for most uses). There is also some information that has been overlooked, and that’s related to the Lite version of the DaVinci Resolve color grading suite. More »

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anamorphicThe anamorphic look is highly desired by many filmmakers for many reasons, including unique lens flares and bokehs. We posted an article a week ago on shooting anamorphic, and one thing some of you might’ve noticed is that anamorphic adapters and lenses can be expensive. So, if you find yourself in a bind financially, but are still wanting your images to resemble the aesthetic that anamorphic provides, Vashi Nedomansky of VashiVisuals is offering his After Effects plugin, VashiMorphic40, for the low, low price of free. Continue on for more details. More »

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Premiere Pro CC 7.1 UpdateAlthough many people still aren’t thrilled with the subscription model of Adobe’s Creative Cloud, it’s difficult not to be happy with the regularity with which they are now able to roll out major updates to the software. Last month, Adobe released a comprehensive list of new features that would be added in the 7.1 update of Premiere Pro CC, new features like native support for CinemaDNG and RED DRAGON footage, and a legitimate roundtrip process between Premiere and SpeedGrade. This evening, Adobe released the update, and it is available and ready for download. Before you start playing with the upgraded software, however, check out reTooled.net’s awesome video overview of these new features: More »

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gbuUnless you’re watching a film critically, it’s easy to get swept away by the story. Even then, it’s difficult to pick up on the many storytelling devices and techniques utilized in films, like costuming, blocking, and editing, which means there’s a possibility of missing the stories within the story. Max Tohline has shared an interesting examination into the editing of the “Trio” scene from Sergio Leone’s 1967 spaghetti western The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, revealing mathematical patterns and images of thought that open up and enrich the narrative. Continue on for the video: More »

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End CrawlEven if all of the hard stuff, like writing, planning, shooting, and editing your film has been finished, there’s still the matter of creating the scrolling end credits. Taking on the task of entering, editing, and proofing every word, as well as taking care of strobe and jitter issues and info wrangling, may not be something you have the time or energy for at the end of the filmmaking process. If paying for a service to do it for you seems like an attractive option, Endcrawl, which is currently in private beta testing, will create your end credits, as well as any revisions you might need, for a one-time fee. More »

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PudovkinWhen it comes to Russian filmmakers, the first names that come to nearly everyone’s mind are Andrei Tarkovsky and  Sergei Eisenstein. Both were exceptional, and Eisenstein is seen as the father of modern montage theory. However, a lesser known filmmaker, Vsevolod Pudovkin, proves just how integral Russian film was to cinema at the beginning of the 20th century by providing his own montage theory, slightly different from that of Eisenstein, that formed the foundation of the classic Hollywood style of editing, which is used in almost every film today. Continue on to check out an informative video that explains Pudovkin’s essential editing techniques. More »