» Posts Tagged ‘f65’

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Super Bowl 4K[As some of you might have heard, there's some kind of sporting match happening today, a big one apparently.] All jesting aside, the Super Bowl isn’t just an epic clash between the NFL’s two best teams. It’s also the absolute pinnacle of sports broadcast media, as both the league and Fox (among others) shell out incredible amounts of money to ensure that the production is as technologically advanced as current broadcast standards will allow. This year is no exception. As the Broncos and Seahawks go head to head today (go Broncos), the Fox Sports production team will be utilizing over 100 Sony cameras, several of which will be 4K, to ensure that we, the viewers, have the best seat in the house. Here’s a brief look at how it will all go down this afternoon. More »

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We’ve had a few posts revolving around open source 3D modeling & animation suite Blender recently, including some info on using it to model color space in three dimensions. Now, as a bit of a ‘BTW, FYI’ to a more recent post concerning the free release of all 4k F65 footage acquired for Blender’s CGI/live-action Tears of Steel, we have some info that may actually help you visualize that or any other 4k footage in full-res — without an actual 4k monitor. It isn’t perfect — it’s a bit rough and ready, and may require Linux, but we thought our readers should know that it’s possible, especially since very few of us have access to 4k viewing, be it through projection or UHD TV sets. Read on for some details on how the Project Mango team devised its ‘DIY 4k’ monitoring solution. More »

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The Blender Foundation is constantly pushing the boundaries of availability, openness, and access to the raw materials it uses to create its ‘proof-of-Blender’ animated shorts. This type of access is usually more associated with open source software than filmmaking, but especially since the Project Mango live-action CGI/VFX-heavy  Tears of Steel was realized, that distinction has become increasingly blurred. Now filmmakers, animators, or compositors looking to cut their teeth on professional-grade material have access to the entirety of Tears of Steel‘s footage, in 4k OpenEXR (in the ACES color space), courtesy Xiph.org. In the meantime, the Foundation has also made available a number of resources concerning their post-production pipeline, which allowed them to transcode 4K Sony F65 footage to those Linux-workable OpenEXR frames. Check below for more details. More »

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The FOR-A 4K high-speed camera from FT-ONE didn’t get all that much attention when it was first announced, due in part to the fact that it’s probably going to be a rental only, but also because the name of both the company and the camera are easily confused and/or forgettable. No worries though, the camera does exist, and it’s capable of some pretty astounding frame rates at extremely high-resolution. It’s a specialty device for sure, but that doesn’t mean we can’t fantasize about using one, right? A Swiss company, Kamerawerk GmbH, put one to use in their recent No Sleep 4K music video (which they will be releasing as a 4K download), and they’ve posted a behind-the-scenes video showing the camera recording 4K at an astounding 860 frames per second, as well as another video showing off the rest of the production which is utilizing the Sony F65 as well. More »

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I had a chance to stop by Atomos, RedRock, ikan, Jag35, Zacuto and had some great conversations with the people there. I will have video updates from all of these companies and more as soon as I can get them uploaded (again hotel WiFi is brutal, I know I am not the only one suffering from this problem). NAB 2012 is flying by and there is enough happening at this show that if it ran for a month it would still be impossible to cover everything in-depth. On a side note, if you’re going to make an app for your show (the NAB 2012 app), why not promote it a little more? This is probably advice for anyone making an app for any type of event like this, but promote it like crazy – from posters to telling people about it when they register.

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I was in the room at this year’s NAB when Sony revealed the F65, and one of my first thoughts was to wonder why it was called the F65 if the F35 was named because its sensor size matched that of 35mm film. With their announcement today that the F65 will retail for $65k, perhaps the camera was named because of target price? Strange. The F65 has the same size sensor as the F35, but upgrades the pixel count to a “true” 4K (I’m putting “true” in quotes because the F65 has a nonstandard pixel array that producers a resolution of 8768 x 2324). More »