» Posts Tagged ‘fcpx’

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While it seems that Premiere gets most of the attention these days, there are still plenty of users who are cutting their work on Final Cut Pro X. Regardless of the reason, FCPX can be a little quirky in how it deals with audio and video, and some functions are slightly different than they were in Final Cut Pro 7. In this tutorial from Steve Martin of Ripple Training, learn how to remove unwanted sounds from your audio in Final Cut Pro X. More »

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It’s no secret that Apple has been moving into the consumer space for the past five years, with the introduction of the iPhone and iPad, and the long wait between versions of Final Cut Studio, with the most recent version, Final Cut Pro X, resembling their consumer editing application iMovie. Whether FCPX has professional features is another matter entirely, but there’s no denying that they’ve abandoned most of the professional suite and are sticking to lower-priced applications sold through the App Store. While it seems Apple is banking on higher resolutions to sell more iPads and iPhones, they’ve ignored many professionals that have made Apple the brand they are today. Rumor has it that the Mac Pro line may be finished, but a working professional has created a Facebook page seeking answers. More »

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Yes, very well. But also, not quite. With Apple’s 10.0.3 release of Final Cut Pro X, they added multicam support and a host of other features, but more importantly for some, they finally made it possible to move projects from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X. Well, that’s not quite true. Apple didn’t actually make this possible – they are promoting the product of a 3rd party, Intelligent Design, to facilitate upgrading old projects. Here’s a quick overview of the process: More »

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Apple today released an update to the controversial Final Cut Pro X, adding multicam support, advanced chroma keying, media relinking upgrades, and enhanced XML support. There’s also a third party app that — get this — actually allows you to import Final Cut Pro 7 projects. FCPX is now at 10.0.3, and while I’m not sure this will make anyone give up their copy of 7, it’s a step in the right direction (and a significant upgrade for current X users). Here are the details: More »

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Catching up all the latest video software and hardware news (here’s part one): More »

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I know, I know, Final Cut Pro X has been slammed by many, so what’s the point in posting yet another article about it? Well, one question I’ve been asked a lot since the release of FCP X is, “I’m a student, what NLE should I learn?” Before, the answer was easy: Final Cut Pro. Now, not so much. Should a student commit to FCP X, assuming it will become the future standard despite being woefully incomplete at present, or should they learn Adobe or Avid, assuming Apple’s role in the professional, wage-earning editing world as we know it is over? It’s a tough question, and I’m curious to hear your thoughts in the comments. In the meantime, here’s famed editor Walter Murch (The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather II, and The English Patient among many others) talking about the X at the Boston Supermeet: More »

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XML import/export has finally made its way to Final Cut Pro X in a 10.0.1 update Apple released today. This brings, yes, a form of backwards compatibility for Final Cut Pro 7 users, as one can now import and export rich XML files from FCPX. Unfortuantely — and I initially misunderstood this — “rich XML” does NOT work with Final Cut Pro 7 (more on this after the jump)! But also among the new features are GPU-accelerated export rendering (as opposed to just playback), Xsan support, and a camera import SDK (to allow developers to write plugins for specific cameras). Apple’s Richard Townhill, senior director of applications product marketing said of the release: More »

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Since Apple introduced the much-maligned Final Cut Pro X, Adobe’s Mac Video apps have reportedly enjoyed a 45% boost in sales. This is in all likelihood partially thanks to Adobe’s offer of 50% off for Final Cut Pro users (Avid editors are also eligible). Perhaps as a result of this newfound confidence, Adobe has also purchased IRIDAS, a company known best for their high-end SpeedGrade color grading software. More »

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After days of rumors, it’s official: according to Apple, “a limited quantity of Final Cut Studio [are] still available through Apple telesales to customers who need them for ongoing projects.” What’s the big deal? Apple had previously pulled all copies of FCS from the shelves, and this represents a capitulation to the ongoing demand for their two year-old NLE in the face of negative reactions to FCPX. I thought Walter Biscardi put it best: More »

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When Apple released Final Cut Pro X, they did so without giving third-party plugin developers access ahead of time; thus there’s been a shortage of add-ons for the controversial app. Red Giant Software has just released their first plugin to be ported to FCPX, and it’s one of their simpler apps, Magic Bullet Mojo. FCPX’s current architecture doesn’t support some of the more complicated functionality included in Looks or Colorista, so X editors will have to make do with the simpler interface of Mojo for the time being. As a bonus, however, Red Giant has cut the price in half for this week only, bringing it down to $49 — and the coupon code works on all platforms, not just FCPX. Here’s the program in action: More »

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While stalled underground on a NYC subway several weeks ago, on my phone I started writing a post entitled “Final Cut Pro X is a Brilliant Rethink of the NLE, but I’m Switching to Adobe. Here’s Why.” (It’s not because Adobe is offering 50% off, though that helps). The train delay turned out to be of a briefer variety than expected, and so I never finished the post — and since then hundreds of bloggers have talked ad nauseum about FCP X and I haven’t felt a need to add another voice to the mix. However, this presentation by Evan Schechtman at NYC’s Apple shop Tekserve is the best overview/history/contextualizing of the FCP X situation I’ve seen (and not just its past, but its future): More »

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Thanks to Dashwood Cinema Solutions’ $99 plugin Stereo 3D Toolbox LE, Final Cut Pro X can now handle stereoscopic 3D footage. Just don’t try to bring in that old FCP7 timeline (sorry, couldn’t help myself). The plugin works in Final Cut Pro X, Apple Motion, and Adobe After Effects, and is said to work fine in OS X Lion. Here’s a tutorial of how to use the plugin (note: this won’t be of interest to you unless you’re thinking about, or are already, working with 3D): More »

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Denver Riddle from Color Grading Central has released a free 15-part tutorial on color correction in Final Cut Pro X. Apple’s controversial NLE reboot introduces a number of new features and interface elements, chief of which is the Color Board, seen in the following tutorial. Hit the full link below for all 15 parts, which in addition to streaming for free are available as downloads for $49. More »

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By default, Final Cut Pro X shows all mounted events and projects, at all times. Those of us used to working in a more project-focused NLE — the kind that isolates one client’s files from another’s — may want a bit more control over FCP X’s management. This is where the new $4.99 app Event Manager X comes in. Here’s the list of features: More »

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Robbie Carman, co-author of the just-published An Editor’s Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro, presents a tutorial perfect for those editors switching from Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro. While I like a lot of things about Final Cut Pro X (more on that soon), the inability to open old project files is indefensible. The easiest transition path is actually to switch to Premiere Pro (50% off if you own FCP), choose FCP’s keyboard shortcuts within Premiere, and open your FCP 7 project files in Adobe’s NLE thanks to XML interchange. Here’s how to do it: More »

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Just a couple of years ago the statement, “step up to the toolset the pros use, Adobe Premiere” would be taken as a joke by any professional editor. Yet there it is on Adobe’s site, thanks to numerous updates over the years. And with the release of Final Cut Pro X, suddenly the easiest NLE to transition to from Final Cut Pro 7 is not FCPX but rather Premiere Pro. Recognizing this with what one can only assume are ear-to-ear grins, the folks at Adobe are offering 50% off Adobe CS5.5 Production Premium or Premiere Pro if you own Apple Final Cut Pro (or Avid Media Composer). Here are the details (and an instructional video for doing so): More »

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Video learning site Izzy Video has created a 2.5 hour Final Cut Pro X online training course — and released it for free. Many of the tutorials at Izzy’s site are normally part of a paid membership, but you can go watch this one in its 26-part entirety, without charge. I haven’t done a tutorial on nonlinear video editing since 1998, when I first learned how to edit on a Media 100. But when I booted up Final Cut Pro X this week, I was lost. I couldn’t even drag a clip onto the timeline because the behavior was completely new. So much thanks to Izzy for posting. More »

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Okay, instead of just giving FCP X a hard time, let’s take a look at something that’s a bit more helpful for those trying to learn the new program. This Thursday, June 30 2011 from 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM PDT, FilmmakingWebinars.com will be putting on a free live seminar on Final Cut Pro X by Scott Simmons. Here’s a preview of the presentation: More »

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The Final Cut Pro X release has so many editors up in arms that one mocking video is not enough. Jeffrey Harrell cut this exploration of Final Cut Pro X’s (missing) features to emulate the trailer for The Social Network, using snippets of Steve Jobs’ own speech from WWDC ’97: More »

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Let’s review: Adobe Premiere Pro reaches feature parity with Final Cut Pro, exceeding it in some aspects, and in the process builds up an equal-sized customer base as Apple’s NLE. Then Apple relaunches FCP from the ground up — and removes a lot of the features shared between the two, making Premiere Pro undeniably more feature-rich. It seems perfect timing for Adobe, whose application is now easier to migrate to from Final Cut Pro 7 than is Apple’s. I’m still learning FCP X and I think it has a ton of potential, but at the very least, Adobe has to be happy with the missing features in FCP X that everyone’s complaining about. So let’s take a look at one feature both video solutions are touting highly: automatic camera stabilization. More »