» Posts Tagged ‘film’

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Quentin Tarantino Cannes 2014 Press ConferenceQuentin Tarantino has not been shy about his distaste for all things digital. He has stayed true to shooting on 35mm film, but most theaters and distributors are moving away from projecting in the format. Speaking at the Cannes Film Festival (where a 20th anniversary screening of Pulp Fiction is the only film showing in 35mm), Tarantino again reiterated his displeasure about digital projection, going so far as to say that the loss of 35mm projection means that what he knew as cinema is dead. More »

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Dale McCready Atlantis Season 2 Camera TestCamera technology has come a long way in the last 5 years. Dale McCready, the DP on the TV show Atlantis, normally shoots on 35mm for the show, but wanted to see how newer solutions stack up and could be intercut with the film material for Season 2. Since he already knows the ALEXA well, he took the 6K DRAGON from RED and his Canon 5D Mark III shooting Magic Lantern RAW and tested all sorts of different combinations of filters on the cameras. More »

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Inside Llewyn DavisOf the many amazing films that were released in 2013, few looked as unique, or as stylistically gorgeous, as the Coens’ love song to the 1960′s NY folk scene, Inside Llewyn DavisOf course, Roger Deakins, the regular cinematographer for the Coen brothers, was not available to shoot the film, so the prolific filmmaking duo turned to another industry legend, acclaimed French DP Bruno Delbonnel, who is most known for his stunning work on Amélie. The fine folks at Cinefii recently sat down with Delbonnel at the Cameraimage Festival in Poland, where he revealed many of the techniques that he used to create the unique aesthetic of Inside Llewyn Davis, as well as some insights into what it’s like to work with Joel and Ethan Coen. More »

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Screen Shot 2014-03-16 at 11.47.00 PMBelieve it or not, shooting on film is still a legitimate thing (I know, it’s shocking). Despite the fact that digital imaging is finally matching the technical capabilities of film (and maybe even surpassing it in the case of DRAGON), many narrative productions are still shooting on good old fashioned celluloid. What does this mean for younger folks looking to make a career in the camera department? Well for one, it means that knowing your way around a film camera, and knowing how to load various types of magazines, is still a valuable skill in this industry, one that might land you a gig or two. Luckily for us, literally anything can be learned on YouTube, including the methods for loading film in a variety of popular magazines and cameras. More »

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NebraskaA little while back, I shared an ASC podcast that featured Nebraska cinematographer Phedon Papamichael. In that interview, Papamichael talked about many of the cinematic techniques behind the well-received Alexander Payne road movie. For those of you who love to hear cinematographers talk about their work and the theory behind it, you’ve probably seen many of the fantastic interviews that Cinefii puts together. Well, dear cinematography geeks, the fine folks at Cinefii have done it again, as they’ve just put out an extended interview with Phedon Papamichael in which he reveals even more of the techniques that he used to bring Nebraska to life. More »

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12 Years a SlaveOf the many excellent films to hit theaters last year, few were as powerful (or as well shot) as the Best Picture Oscar winner, 12 Years A Slave. It’s one of those rare films that transcends its utterly brutal subject matter and makes a powerful statement about the resiliency of the human spirit. Although much of that power is derived from terrific acting and direction, Sean Bobbitt’s masterful cinematography plays a critical role in allowing the emotionality of the story and its characters to emanate from the screen. In a pair of excellent interviews with Cinefii and Time LightBox, Bobbitt explains not only how he managed to craft such a gorgeous film, but also his theories behind portraying violence through film, working with Steve McQueen, and much, much more. Stick with us for a crash course in dramatic cinematography. More »

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kendricken_celluloid_film_fuji_fujifilm_production_manufacture_cancelWith modern digital cinema cameras, it is often preferable to achieve a look that is more “cinematic” than “digital.” No one factor creates a filmic feel, but the precedent is simple enough — film itself. The emulation of emulsion may depend on anything from lens choice and lighting to grading and grain plug-ins, but there is one sure-fire way to get a true film look: using film. Celluloid acquisition may be beyond the budget of your shoot, but using a “film intermediate” process — that is, transferring color corrected digital footage out to film, then scanning back to digital — could be one technique for splitting the difference. A webinar with VFX artist & colorist Jerome Thelia details just such a process, regarding the Oscar-winning short film Curfew. Read on for details. More »

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Anchorman 2 Last Paramount Movie Distributed on FilmMovies have been shown in theaters on actual film since the beginning of the format, but this year could very well be the last that we get to experience new films on 35mm. It has been reported that Paramount is ending distribution on celluloid, with Anchorman 2 being their last film print release — instead releasing all new movies digitally. What does this mean for the rest of the industry, and who is going to get left behind in the process? More »

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Daryn Okada ASC KodakEarlier in the year, Kodak emerged from chapter 11 bankruptcy, thus preserving the future of film as a capture medium, at least for the time being. While a vast majority of us don’t have the resources to be able to shoot celluloid on a regular basis, or even at all, it’s still an incredibly viable capture medium in both high-end filmmaking and independent filmmaking alike. For that reason, it’s still important for modern cinematographers to have a grasp of not only how to shoot film, but also to know the subtle aesthetic differences in various film stocks. For most of their modern stocks, Kodak has produced in-depth comparison videos to showcase the abilities and differences of the new stocks against their older counterparts. Here are a few of my favorites. More »

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Nebraska Black and WhiteI’m a sucker for good black and white cinematography. For that reason, 2013 was a fantastic year. We were given a slew of unique independent films shot in black and white, from Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing to Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha. While these films have wonderful aesthetics, perhaps the most gorgeous black and white cinematography of the year came from Phedon Papamichael’s efforts on Alexander Payne’s most recent flick, Nebraska. Papamichael recently sat down for an interview on the ASC Podcast in which he talks extensively about the processes and intricacies of black and white cinematography in the digital age. More »

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Mr_Christmas

With a Vimeo Staff Pick under its belt in this the month of making merry, Nick Palmer’s documentary about the charmingly idiosyncratic Bruce Mertz, better known in Concord, California as Mr. Christmas, looks set to rack up views in numbers equal to its subject’s annual display of synchronized festive lights. A working Hollywood screenwriter who, with writing partner Jeremiah Friedman, has penned and sold scripts to studies and has the coveted distinction of being included on the much-lauded Black List, Palmer joins No Film School to discuss his writing career and how he brought the story of Mr. Christmas to screen. Prepared to be dazzled after the jump. More »

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Film v Digital“Which looks better: film or digital?” It’s one of those questions that can’t really be answered, because every filmmaker has different tastes and opinions, but Joey Shanks (you might know him from his awesome stop motion/in-camera effects tutorials) puts film and digital head to head to show the difference between what the two mediums look like in stop motion animation. He even challenges viewers to guess what the last clip was recorded with, and will reveal the answer come December 26th. It’s harder than you might think, but continue on to see for yourself! More »

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Nolab CartridgeThere is no shortage of film cameras on the market these days. From small 8mm and Super 8 cameras to Super 16 and Super 35 film cameras, there are many available for rental or purchase. In a technical sense, these cameras can never truly become obsolete because they are analogue and purely mechanical by nature. There’s only one problem: film is really damn expensive. Not only the stock itself, but the processing and the DI as well. But what if these old mechanical cameras could be repurposed with modern technology in order to create digital images? Well, with the Nolab Digital Super 8 Cartridge, they can. More »

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Here at No Film School, we’re massive fans of the fine folks over at Stillmotion. Day in and day out, they’re not only doing what they love (and doing it well) in order to make a living, but they’re also sharing everything they learn along the way on their blog and through their numerous workshops. For the past year or so, Stillmotion has been in the process of producing their first feature-length independent documentary, entitled #standwithme. Not only does the documentary itself look fantastic, but the way that it was funded, produced, and (will be) distributed breaks the mold, and it may very well set a new precedent for how independent films are made in the future. More »

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Making a SceneJanusz Kaminski is an industry legend. Since 1990, he has DP’d over 30 feature films, and been nominated for 6 cinematography Oscars (two of which he’s won). His most notable work has been with Steven Spielberg, for whom he’s shot just about every film in recent memory. This past month, Kaminski partnered up with The New York Times to direct 11 original short films for the NYT Magazine’s “Movies Issue.” Each film was shot on the RED EPIC MX (which is unusual for Kaminski since he normally shoots film) and features one of Hollywood’s most prominent actors, ranging from Bradley Cooper to Robert Redford, and a single line of dialogue written by one of today’s top screenwriters. Check out a few of the films below, as well as an excellent behind the scenes video showing Kaminski’s filmmaking process: More »

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FilmConvert Save 25 PercentFilmConvert from Rubber Monkey is a unique film stock emulator because it’s not just about applying a look to your footage, it’s about replicating the exact color profile of specific film stocks on specific cameras and color profiles (standard, neutral, etc). Rather than a one-size-fits-all approach, the best results come from using cameras and profiles that are supported. Recently Rubber Monkey added an OFX plugin version, which means that the software can now work directly in DaVinci Resolve 10 or Resolve Lite 10, along with other programs that work with those plugins. They’ve also got a Black Friday sale going on through Monday that will give you 25% off any of their programs or bundles. Click through for more on the sale and to see the new OFX plugin in action. More »

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Here at NFS, we’ve covered experimental films from time to time, sharing details on how they’re made and things of that nature. Last month we even shared a delightful, albeit brief, history of experimental cinema that touched on a few of the core concepts and definitive filmmakers of the genre. Despite these brief forays into the avant-garde, however, we’ve never actually talked about making experimental films. Until now, that is. In our new series, “Experimental Filmmaking for Dummies”, we’ll explore not only the multitude of reasons why every filmmaker can benefit from experimental filmmaking, but also how to get started with making shorts in all of the most popular experimental sub-genres. Stick with us on this one. It’ll be a fun ride. More »

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Ray DolbyA little over a week ago, the audio and filmmaking communities lost a legendary member, Ray Dolby. If audio is equally important as picture in filmmaking, then it stands to reason that Ray Dolby has done more to elevate the craft and enjoyment of film than any other individual in the history of the medium. It’s a bold statement, to be sure, but one that makes sense when trying to contextualize his lifetime of extraordinary achievements. Here are just a few of the ways in which Ray Dolby indelibly enriched each and every one of our lives. More »

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stock-footage-film-projector-dolly-shot-slow-motion-closeThe recent history of film as a capture medium has been a troubled one. First, Kodak filed for bankruptcy protection in early 2012. Then in the first quarter of 2013, Fuji halted production of motion picture capture stocks, thus leaving the financially troubled Kodak as the only remaining capture stock producer. Beyond these troubles, the rapid proliferation of digital capture has forced many processing facilities to shut down, and prices for transfers and high-resolution DI’s have skyrocketed. However, on Tuesday Kodak announced that it had emerged from its Chapter 11 restructuring as a leaner and more focused company. What does this mean for the future of film as a capture medium? More »

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offlineIt’s not hard to get precious about pretty much everything in filmmaking. There’s one thing coming off the set, though, that’s more valuable than anything else — the film. It has long been preferable to treat the camera negative like the delicate, precious amalgam that it is by editing a place-holder version in lieu of damaging the original. In some fashion or another, this concept has followed editors through post production for much of filmmaking history. Even in the digital realm, it may sometimes be preferable to edit “offline” before conforming to “online” for striking the “master print.” Read a bit more into the fundamentals of the offline/online below. More »