» Posts Tagged ‘filmlanguage’

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House of Cards - Kevin Spacey - Text MessageFor the past 15 years, filmmakers have been attempting to tackle a serious problem: how to visually portray the screens that permeate every aspect of modern life. From computers to smart phones, screens — and more importantly, the information on those screens — have become instrumental components of the contemporary human experience. As such, filmmakers have an inherent need to find ways to incorporate this experience and information into their visual stories. The only problem? Pointing a camera at a cell phone or computer often doesn’t look great, and it can be difficult to absorb the required information. Some filmmakers, however, have found ways to make it interesting. More »

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CropperCapture[30]The basics of the film language are just that, basics. You’ve got your wides and mediums and close-ups, and all sorts of variances in between. You’ve got OTS shots and 2-shots, and of course some cutaways. Then you’ve got the insert, the simple, lowly insert. Usually inserts are used to provide a closer look at some detail in a scene. However, when the insert shot becomes an instrumental part of a film’s individual language, some interesting things can happen. For instance, David Fincher’s masterful and suspenseful thriller Zodiac makes extensive use of the insert shot, and it has a profound and meaningful impact on how the film’s language interacts with and supports the characters and story.  More »

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Evolution of Cinema_Tom PerlmutterIn a quick, yet thought-provoking video for the Future of Storytelling Summit, Government Film Commissioner and Chairperson of the National Film Board of Canada Tom Perlmutter shares his thoughts on the future of storytelling. He explains the basic human need behind the act of telling a story, how that act has evolved over time, and where its evolution is heading: transmedia. To find out more on what Perlmutter says about interactive filmmaking, check out the video after the jump. More »

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Martin Scorsese, Los Angeles, 1986I think the thing that made the greatest impact on me when I was in college was this strange concept, one I’d never heard of before — the concept of visual literacy. Understanding the historical, technical, and cultural significance of the film language is incredibly important, and in an essay by Martin Scorsese, he writes at length about how understanding it is not only imperative to create better films, but also for experiencing the intricate design of a cinematic story, and fully appreciating the auteurs who have managed to become masters of a widely foreign, albeit universal tongue. More »