» Posts Tagged ‘filmmaking’

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IdeasFinding which tools will bolster your creativity is not only important for your work, but to also keep things interesting. Maybe you’ve had friends, colleagues, even industry professionals share their secrets for maintaining a creative spirit to ensure the influx of ideas, but what about science? What do scientists consider to be major conductors of creativity? Fast Company shares 6 tools that, according to science, may help you live and work more creatively. More »

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RigWheels PortaRail SystemWe’ve talked about some nifty gear from RigWheels before, but the thing that separates their gear from some other solutions is modularity. You can put together a dolly or camera mount with as little or as much of their gear as you’d like, and most of it can be adapted to other rigs you might already own. This year at NAB, we talked to Lance about the new PortaRail collapsible dolly/slider rail system. This system can fit inside one case and features 40″ long high-grade aluminum pipes that connect together seamlessly with threaded connectors. Check out the interview below: More »

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Werner Herzog DocLegendary German filmmaker Werner Herzog is truly one of the masters of documentary, and he has created more amazing documentaries than could be counted on all of your fingers and toes. In a rather unlikely partnership, Herzog recently teamed  up with several major cellular companies in order to craft a short documentary about one of the major issues that we face in our technology-laden society, texting and driving. The result is a doc called From One Second to the Next, and it might very well be some of Herzog’s most haunting and heart-wrenching work to date. More »

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BeethovenIt’s easy to get lost in the hustle and bustle of our busy lives, allowing our creative endeavors to go by the wayside indefinitely until we can work them into our schedules. But it’s interesting to remember that every single one of our creative heroes all have (or had) the same number of hours in a day to complete their work. RJ Andrews of Info We Trust has put together an enlightening infographic using the book Daily Rituals: How Artists Work that illustrates how some of history’s greatest creative minds fit their creative work into their daily life. More »

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Akira Kurosawa(Answer: Everything!) Akira Kurosawa is in a league of his own. To master filmmakers, like Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and Oliver Stone, he was the teacher, and often shared his knowledge with those who asked. Flavorwire has published a few pieces of said knowledge in the form of Kurosawa’s greatest filmmaking quotes — ones that beautifully answer questions about the craft, advise us on storytelling, and remind us why we fell in love with cinema in the first place. More »

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Alfonso Cuaron BAFTABAFTA LA recently sat down with director Alfonso Cuarón for their Behind Closed Doors series, in which he answered questions surrounding everything from his childhood love of classic cinema to the motivation behind the choices he made on Gravity. It’s a rare look into not only an Academy Award-winning director’s life, but into a career that is marked with great boldness, mastery — and an expulsion from film school. Listen to Cuarón  share about his childhood discovery of films, turbulent years in film school, and his current approach to filmmaking after the jump. More »

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Google GlassIn 1960, the Eclair camera system revolutionized the way documentary filmmakers could interact with their subjects. As a result of this technological breakthrough, and the infinite possibilities of an unfettered handheld camera, cinéma vérité was born and handheld narrative films followed suit. Cut to the year 2014, and a new technology has surfaced that could once again change the way visual stories are told. I’m talking of course about Google Glass, and any other interactive eyewear that will surely come along soon. Even though Google Glass is mostly seen as a plaything for trendy techies, one filmmaker has already begun to tell stories in a way that we’ve never seen before, and the results are fascinating. More »

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Screen Shot 2014-03-16 at 11.47.00 PMBelieve it or not, shooting on film is still a legitimate thing (I know, it’s shocking). Despite the fact that digital imaging is finally matching the technical capabilities of film (and maybe even surpassing it in the case of DRAGON), many narrative productions are still shooting on good old fashioned celluloid. What does this mean for younger folks looking to make a career in the camera department? Well for one, it means that knowing your way around a film camera, and knowing how to load various types of magazines, is still a valuable skill in this industry, one that might land you a gig or two. Luckily for us, literally anything can be learned on YouTube, including the methods for loading film in a variety of popular magazines and cameras. More »

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Wes Anderson Doc headerWhen watching a film that’s well-made, it’s easy to forget that it’s built from the ground up. This is especially fascinating when considering the quirky universe of Wes Anderson, who designs, builds, and captures every one of his films to meet the standards of a precocious perfectionist. Thanks to this Vimeo Staff Pick mini-documentary by Paul Waters, we get to peek inside the sometimes subtle, sometimes overt methods Anderson uses to craft his characters, sets, and shots. More »

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Lena DunhamSXSW saw tons of great minds — filmmakers, executives, and creatives — come through and participate in panel discussions (some of which we had the pleasure of attending). Indiewire has compiled some great filmmaking advice shared at several of these panels by some incredibly talented and influential industry professionals, including producer (now Fandor CEO) Ted Hope and filmmaker Lena Dunham. Continue on to check out what they said. More »

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Barry LyndonIt has been fifteen years to the day since one of the greatest filmmakers to ever walk the planet unfortunately departed from it. Stanley Kubrick, who demonstrated his impeccable storytelling abilities in films like 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, and many others, died on this day back in 1999, and what better way to acknowledge the empty place the legendary auteur left in the cinematic world after his death than with a celebration of how he managed to give his films such presence during his life. Continue on to watch a video tribute to the late director that shines a light on his brilliant signature themes and cinematic techniques. More »

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CreativityIf you’re a creative person, you might’ve wondered, perhaps especially in your youth, what the hell was wrong with you. Maybe you were the “weird” kid in class that was always looking out the window, or maybe you were teased for your bizarre taste in clothes. We’ve all been there — it kind of goes with the territory if you’re creative, and according to this article from the Huffington Post, many of us do a lot of the same things because we’re creative. Continue on for a scientific look at things highly creative people do — learn a little bit more about yourself, as well as get inspired to try something new. More »

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Terminator SalvationDirector McG (3 Days to Kill) has lent his filmmaking talents to virtually ever major area in entertainment media. He has helmed high grossing films like Charlie’s Angels, produced wildly popular TV shows like Chuck, and made music videos for some of the biggest names in music. If you’re asking yourself how he does it, this article from MovieMaker Magazine might help to explain. Pulling from his nearly 20 years of filmmaking experience, McG has shared six “golden rules of moviemaking“. Check them out after the jump. More »

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ScorseseCountless filmmakers set their stories and tripods down in New York to make their movies, but when I think about the filmmakers whose work encapsulates the unique heart and spirit of the city, two come immediately to mind: Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese. The object of Robert Kolodny’s affection, and the one for which he honors in a beautiful video tribute, is Queens-native Scorsese, whose entire career could be seen as a love relationship with the city played out on celluloid. In his three-minute video, Kolodny whisks us through New York, letting us peer through the eyes of the great director through his most celebrated work. More »

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HBOAccessHBO has launched HBOAccess, a 4-week program which gives diverse filmmakers the chance to receive not only valuable mentorship and learning opportunities, but actual short-form content for one of their many different platforms, including HBO Go, HBO, HBO’s YouTube channel, HBO.com, film festivals, charity screenings and other outlets as well. Applications are now being accepted, so continue on to find out more about the program, as well as eligibility. More »

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Tze Chun and Bryan Cranston

Director Tze Chun came up big in 2010 with his debut Sundance drama Children of Invention, which he also self-distributed. Now he’s back with his recently-released sophomore effort Cold Comes The Night, starring none other than America’s darling bad-boy Bryan Cranston. Read on for our interview with the filmmaker as he discusses what it’s like to build on his humble indie roots. More »

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Guerilla Filmmaking - Look Closer - Movie PremiereWhen you’re a filmmaker with no money, and you need a location for a scene, there’s a good chance you’re going to be stealing some shots without permits. That’s exactly what filmmaker Chris Schwab and his team did when they needed a movie premiere for a scene in his micro-budget film Look Closer. When you live in the LA area, there are countless premieres every week, so what could be more realistic than sneaking your actor into a real one and getting the shots you need? Don’t try this at home (or do if you’re aware of the consequences). More »

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All Is LostTwo years ago, JC Chandor’s first feature film Margin Call did the unthinkable. It humanized the people responsible for the banking disaster of 2008. His second feature, the devastatingly titled All Is Lost, attempts an even more outlandish filmmaking feat. It’s a dialogue-free, yet entirely gripping story of a single character, masterfully played by Robert Redford, who is marooned at sea when his boat is irreparably damaged by a stray shipping container. What’s even more impressive, from a technical filmmaking standpoint, is that most of the effects in this epic survival tale were accomplished practically. Here’s a brief look at how it all came together. More »

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Film Set
Right now you’re probably thinking to yourself, “That’s a pretty bold title for an article, Mr. Hardy. There couldn’t possibly be one single thing that’s SO important that it could make or break your career as a filmmaker.” Well No Film Schoolers, there is, in fact, one thing that is more important than all of the skills that you’ve put together over the years, the gear that you own, or even your sparkling production resume. It’s such an important facet of your success, yet we rarely, if ever, think or talk about it. And now that the suspense has been adequately built, the single most valuable thing that people can do for building a career in the filmmaking industry is… More »

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Patrick-Moreau-Namibia-BTS3 WIDE

Here at No Film School, we’re massive fans of the fine folks over at Stillmotion. Day in and day out, they’re not only doing what they love (and doing it well) in order to make a living, but they’re also sharing everything they learn along the way on their blog and through their numerous workshops. For the past year or so, Stillmotion has been in the process of producing their first feature-length independent documentary, entitled #standwithme. Not only does the documentary itself look fantastic, but the way that it was funded, produced, and (will be) distributed breaks the mold, and it may very well set a new precedent for how independent films are made in the future. More »