» Posts Tagged ‘filmstock’

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Film PerforationsLast week, celluloid lovers scored a major victory when a few major studios struck a pact with Kodak to ensure that film would remain a viable capture medium for the foreseeable future. Because film will be sticking around for a while, there is still value in learning the ins and outs of the various film formats available today, especially for cinematographers aspiring to work at the highest levels of the industry. One of the aspects of film that beginning filmmakers often find confusing is that of perforations, or the small holes that line the edges of the stock. In a technical sense, these perforations are what the sprocket catches in order to hold each individual frame in place so that it can be properly exposed. However, perforations are also used to describe the various formats and aspect ratios of film, and that’s where things can get confusing. Luckily, there’s a handy new infographic that explains everything you need to know about film perforations. More »

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Daryn Okada ASC KodakEarlier in the year, Kodak emerged from chapter 11 bankruptcy, thus preserving the future of film as a capture medium, at least for the time being. While a vast majority of us don’t have the resources to be able to shoot celluloid on a regular basis, or even at all, it’s still an incredibly viable capture medium in both high-end filmmaking and independent filmmaking alike. For that reason, it’s still important for modern cinematographers to have a grasp of not only how to shoot film, but also to know the subtle aesthetic differences in various film stocks. For most of their modern stocks, Kodak has produced in-depth comparison videos to showcase the abilities and differences of the new stocks against their older counterparts. Here are a few of my favorites. More »

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Nebraska Black and WhiteI’m a sucker for good black and white cinematography. For that reason, 2013 was a fantastic year. We were given a slew of unique independent films shot in black and white, from Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing to Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha. While these films have wonderful aesthetics, perhaps the most gorgeous black and white cinematography of the year came from Phedon Papamichael’s efforts on Alexander Payne’s most recent flick, Nebraska. Papamichael recently sat down for an interview on the ASC Podcast in which he talks extensively about the processes and intricacies of black and white cinematography in the digital age. More »

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stock-footage-film-projector-dolly-shot-slow-motion-closeThe recent history of film as a capture medium has been a troubled one. First, Kodak filed for bankruptcy protection in early 2012. Then in the first quarter of 2013, Fuji halted production of motion picture capture stocks, thus leaving the financially troubled Kodak as the only remaining capture stock producer. Beyond these troubles, the rapid proliferation of digital capture has forced many processing facilities to shut down, and prices for transfers and high-resolution DI’s have skyrocketed. However, on Tuesday Kodak announced that it had emerged from its Chapter 11 restructuring as a leaner and more focused company. What does this mean for the future of film as a capture medium? More »

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FilmConvertAs we’ve mentioned before here at NFS, FilmConvert is one of the best film stock emulators we’ve seen. This program allows users to give their digital footage that much desired cinematic look by using the color information of specific cameras to determine how a specific film stock could best be represented using that sensor. Now, FilmConvert is asking filmmakers to enter their cinematography competition with videos processed by their program. Hit the jump for info on rules, prizes, and how to enter. More »

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It’s seems like an eternity (or a brief instant, maybe) since Ryan first posted about the cessation of major manufacturers’ development and production of motion picture film cameras, and not quite as long since Joe updated us on the all the more tenuous vitality of the only two companies actually making celluloid film, Kodak and Fuji. What’s been announced before is now an all-but-undeniable reality for Fuji, who have just confirmed the company’s plans to bring its production of motion picture film to a full, complete, and permanent dead halt. Read the full scoop below before the ink fully dries on this fairly somber confirmation. More »

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Lomography is both an analog-based film movement as well as a manufacturer of specialty products conducive to such an activity — these include the LomoKino 35mm stills-to-motion camera and the (successfully) Kickstarted Smartphone Film Scanner app/device. Lomography’s goods aren’t for everybody, or every project — but the company has some exciting news for the analog enthusiast in all of us, especially while production of 35mm film seems to be slowing down. Lomography will be releasing a new ISO 400 35mm color negative stock called LomoChrome Purple, inspired by the surreal quality of Kodak’s discontinued Aerochrome infrared stock — read on to check out the details. More »

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Ever wondered what format, camera model, lens type, finishing format, lens manufacturer, etc. was used to create a certain film? You may have found yourself punching in IMDb as your default movie trivia database, and you may have found some or all such information in the film’s technical specs page — or you may not have. While IMDb has a lot of other coverage to keep itself occupied logging (particularly cast and crew lists), you may find yourself wanting a more detailed and dedicated technical breakdown — enter ‘ShotOnWhat?More »