» Posts Tagged ‘filters’

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Split DiopterIf you’ve ever been watching a film, say Carrie or Reservoir Dogsand you’ve seen a shot that had incredibly deep focus, then maybe you were looking at a shot that used a split focus (or split field) diopter. These lens attachments produce a signature look that puts objects near and far into focus, a look that made Gregg Toland a legend, and later swept over the filmmaking world in the 70s. Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals takes a look at the use of split focus diopters throughout cinema, and picks out all 15 shots from Brian De Palma’s 1981 film Blow Out that use one. More »

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Tokina Water Dispersing LensSome more interesting and exciting developments out of IBC 2013 — Tokina showcased their water dispersion filter that will keep you from cringing when you see those dark clouds coming to rain on  your parade (or set.) Tokina has done something with their filter that has not yet been done — used a special hydrophilic coating instead of, say, a vibrating mechanism to keep water from accumulating, keeping lenses dry. Read on to get the details from a video by News Shooter. More »

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If you’ve been using a newer large sensor digital cinema camera, you may have noticed that your image takes on more reddish tones when using increased neutral density filtration. This is related to the way many of these ND filters block visible light, but let in more infrared light which can pollute the image. We’ve seen a few examples showing what IR pollution can do, and today, we have a video comparing RAW cameras, specifically the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, Arri Alexa, and RED EPIC, and how each of them handles black cloth when using IR cut filters of different strengths along with increased ND filtration.

This is a guest post by Cinematographer Ryan E. Walters. More »

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Many were hopeful that Canon was going to rid all of their DSLRs of moire and aliasing, but they’ve saved those improvements to all but their most expensive cameras. The full-frame Canon 6D, which was announced back in September, is about a $1,000 cheaper than the Mark III, but unfortunately suffers from aliasing and moire (something that is absent from the Mark III’s image). Mosaic Engineering has been developing anti-aliasing filters for Canon and Nikon DSLRs, and they’ve finally come out with one for the Canon 6D, the VAF-6D. Could the new filter make it the perfect full-frame camera in terms of price/performance in Canon’s lineup? Check out the first sample video below. More »

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At this point, solid state image sensors have matched or exceeded film in a lot of ways, including light sensitivity, responsiveness to shadow detail, and overall dynamic range — but that doesn’t mean our chips aren’t susceptible to certain problems previously avoided by the nature of emulsion. Indeed, ‘sensitivity’ nowadays means something different altogether — and with the virtual necessity of neutral density filters as a result, this often means vulnerability to infrared pollution. Unless you like shooting at f/22 or you’re already using the Aaton Penelope Delta, you may also require an IR filter with your ND. AbelCine has recently shared a great rundown of which cameras suffer the most from IR pollution — and what filters work best to correct each. More »

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Ever had a filter stuck on your DSLR lens? Raise your hand… Mine is very high in the air, because I’ve done this countless times, especially back in the 35mm adapter days when I would attach my Cinevate Brevis to specific cameras with step up or step down rings, and very often they would get stuck. I’ve also had the problem with DSLR lenses, but I’ve never had to do what Canon suggests: a hacksaw and hammer. Don’t believe me? Read on for the full scoop from Photographer Craig Pulsifer and the steps that were suggested by a Canon technician. More »

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Back in May it was announced that the Canon 7D anti-aliasing/moire filter from Mosaic Engineering was being released, and there were plans to make one for the other cameras as well. We already know how well the filter works for the Canon 5D, but it was anyone’s guess if they had fixed any of the issues with the original filter. Sebastian over at cinema5D takes a look at the filter and compares an unfiltered 7D in the video embedded below: More »

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Not too long ago a company called Mosaic Engineering surprised the DSLR world and came out with a filter that greatly reduced the aliasing and moire patterns on the Canon 5D Mark II. Installation was relatively straightforward, and the only major drawback was that super-wide lenses could appear very soft, especially in the corners. Now they’ve released a similar filter for the Canon 7D, and as you can see from the video embedded below, it will work in much the same way. They are also developing a filter for the Nikon D800, which has similar moire problems as the 5D Mark II, even though I haven’t really noticed it too much in my testing. More »

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I love the smell of fresh aliasing in the morning! Video/DSLR maven (and Man-child backer!) Philip Bloom first broke the news of the VAF-5D2 optical anti-aliasing filter for the Canon 5D Mark II, a $375 filter that promises to fix pesky moire issues on the venerable Canon DSLR. Now he’s got a full review of the filter (I have one on order, as I think it could extend the life of my 5D), which causes a negligible 1/8 stop of light loss: More »

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Yesterday Philip Bloom dropped a bombshell on the HDSLR world, announcing that he’d found a filter that claims to fix most aliasing problems on his 5d Mark II — and that actually works. Earlier solutions have caused a loss of sharpness or didn’t work at all, whereas this $385 optical filter seems to genuinely eliminate moire on most lenses. Check it out: More »

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Here’s a good video from Dave Dugdale on the what a Circular Polarizer filter can (and can’t) do. Polarizers are terrific for very specific conditions — deepening blue skies, reducing glare on reflective surfaces like water or glass — but they’re less universal than an ND filter (or, as I mention in the guide, a variable ND). Check out the polarizer filter in action, shot with a Canon T2i: More »

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We all know one of the chief drawbacks to shooting with (current generation) DSLRs are the rolling shutter artifacts that show up on shaky or fast-panning shots. It turns out that iMovie ’11, in addition to interesting movie trailer templates, includes a filter that can decrease or eliminate these annoying artifacts. Here’s a comparison from Nino Leitner of some Canon T2i footage, before and after using the iMovie ’11 filter: More »