» Posts Tagged ‘finalcut’

Description image

Okay, instead of just giving FCP X a hard time, let’s take a look at something that’s a bit more helpful for those trying to learn the new program. This Thursday, June 30 2011 from 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM PDT, FilmmakingWebinars.com will be putting on a free live seminar on Final Cut Pro X by Scott Simmons. Here’s a preview of the presentation: More »

Description image

The Final Cut Pro X release has so many editors up in arms that one mocking video is not enough. Jeffrey Harrell cut this exploration of Final Cut Pro X’s (missing) features to emulate the trailer for The Social Network, using snippets of Steve Jobs’ own speech from WWDC ’97: More »

Description image

Let’s review: Adobe Premiere Pro reaches feature parity with Final Cut Pro, exceeding it in some aspects, and in the process builds up an equal-sized customer base as Apple’s NLE. Then Apple relaunches FCP from the ground up — and removes a lot of the features shared between the two, making Premiere Pro undeniably more feature-rich. It seems perfect timing for Adobe, whose application is now easier to migrate to from Final Cut Pro 7 than is Apple’s. I’m still learning FCP X and I think it has a ton of potential, but at the very least, Adobe has to be happy with the missing features in FCP X that everyone’s complaining about. So let’s take a look at one feature both video solutions are touting highly: automatic camera stabilization. More »

Description image

Late night talk show host Conan O’Brien has a brave set of editors who aren’t afraid of unfamiliar workflows, as evidenced by their rapid transition to Final Cut Pro X. Here, members of Conan’s editing team show off the new magnetic timeline, title animation, audio synchronization, and color correction features of the much-debated program: More »

Description image

Now that Final Cut Pro X has been out for a full 24 hours, the internet has rendered its verdict on the render-free software, and most of the backlash on Twitter seems to be coming from seasoned professionals. Sure, there were bound to be some repercussions when rebooting an application with a 94% customer satisfaction rate. But some of the features Apple dropped — tape ingest, multiclip, backward compatibility, and the viewer itself — make the “Pro” moniker pretty hard to justify. I’m only getting my hands dirty with FCP X now — which, I should note, works perfectly on the video editor’s hackintosh — and while I’m definitely experiencing some growing pains getting used to the new interface, I feel it’s too early to tell whether I’ll go back to Premiere Pro. However, here are some quotes of what’s being said around the web. Also, I want to hear from you — what are your honest thoughts so far? More »

Description image

As promised, Apple today released Final Cut Pro X on the Mac App Store for $299. The completely-redesigned, much debated application clocks in at 1.33GB and requires a 64-bit processor and OS X 10.6.7 or later. Also debuting today are Motion 5 and Compressor 4 — both priced at only $49.99 apiece. More »

Description image

Reports are surfacing that Apple’s much-ballyhooed 64-bit editing application Final Cut Pro X will be released in the Mac App Store next week. AppleInsider has further confirmed the application will be released “in the next 10 days.” No word on whether this release also includes Motion, Color, Soundtrack Pro, or any other applications that may make up a professional content-creation suite, but the reports also mention that we should expect additional releases alongside the software: More »

Description image

More screenshots of Final Cut Pro X (set to be released this month) have been discovered via twitter, this time by @MortGoldman2. Apparently taken from FCP X training videos that the user claims are “publicly available” (though not found easily or released legally), the new screenshots demonstrate the color correction interface of FCP X, which looks a lot like the Motion screenshots we saw last week. The screens show off a new primary and secondary color correction interface, as well as a full suite of video scopes. From these screens, it would appear that Color (but not Motion) has been folded right into FCP X: More »

Description image

There were no Final Cut Pro X-related announcements among the recent iOS and iCloud-focused Apple updates from WWDC, which was not unexpected (WWDC is not traditionally a film or video event). Except it was originally announced Final Cut Pro X will ship in June, which would mean the much-debanticipated (yes, FCP X hype deserves its own word, a combination of “debated” and “anticipated”) software has a scant three weeks to appear in the App Store. Since the original demonstration, videos, and screenshots, we’ve heard nothing. Then Twitter use BWilks2001 dropped these screenshots, which are reportedly of the new Apple Motion application: More »

Description image

I had no idea when watching David Fincher’s generation-defining (yeah, I said it) The Social Network that the RED-shot film would utilize a post-production process similar to what you or I could execute. It turns out that the crew on the award-winning film conformed all shots — and did some basic visual effects work — using Adobe After Effects, after utilizing Premiere Pro to get their Final Cut Pro timeline into AE. Yes, they also used higher-end tools — notably Quantel’s Pablo for the color grade — but the basic editing tools are the same as you or I might use on a no-budget project. Here’s Fincher and assistant editor Tyler Nelson on the process: More »

Description image

Some have pointed out that many of Final Cut Pro X’s much-lauded new features are not really that “new.” This backlash seems to happen with every Apple product, perhaps out of response to the rapturous reception with which Apple fanboys greet the superlative-laced presentations. In the case of FCP X, the criticism is that FCP X’s list of new features (seen on video) have been around for a while in other editing applications (notably Premiere and Vegas). But a list of features does not an editing program make. It’s not what features you include in a piece of software, it’s how you design them. Read on for some thoughts on intuitive design and a few full resolution screenshots of the new Final Cut Pro X. More »

Description image

Apple hasn’t posted any official acknowledgement of last night’s demonstrations of Final Cut Pro X on their website, and so everyone on the internet is speculating based on lists of features rather than seeing the presentation. Until Apple gets official with any such announcement, then, the next best thing to an official video is an unofficial (kind of shaky) video of the presentation. In my liveblog of the event I noted, “editors are crazy,” and you’ll see that to be the case based on the overenthusiastic reactions here: More »

Description image

I’m live at the sold-out FCPUG SuperMeet in Las Vegas, where the “surprise” guest has turned out to be none other than Apple (“surprise” is in quotes because everyone, this site included, expected it to be AAPL). As expected, Apple has announced the new version of Final Cut Pro, now called Final Cut Pro X, with OpenCL support, backround rendering, and a completely redesigned interface. Here are the new features: More »

Description image

Thanks to your suggestions, I just finished packing the new and diminutive Canon XA10 camcorder (on loan from B&H) to take to NAB. I don’t know how many interviews I’ll be posting from Las Vegas or how quickly I’ll get them online, but I’ll be approaching the show with a relaxed demeanor given there are plenty of other great video/DSLR sites that will be covering the show top-to-bottom and I’m perfectly happy to share their coverage. If you’re going to be at NAB, please come up and say hi — I’d love to actually meet folks face to face (I look like this). On to the real news: every year Editors Lounge holds a pre-NAB roundtable wherein post-production pros discuss the latest trends in hardware and software. Here’s the very informative session in full: More »

Description image

Every year at NAB the FCPUG (Final Cut Pro User Group) puts on their own event dubbed the “SuperMeet.” Since Apple pulled out of NAB two years ago, no one knew how the expected announcement of a new Final Cut Pro at this year’s NAB would take place. With all other scheduled events at this year’s SuperMeet suddenly being cancelled at the request of Apple, who apparently wants exclusive stage time, it looks like the new FCP will be unveiled publicly on April 12 at Bally’s Event Center. The event opens at 4:30pm with presentations beginning at 7. Tickets are currently sold out; guess I should’ve bought a ticket when I had a chance. More details: More »

Description image

Since Apple showed a new version of Final Cut Pro behind closed doors, the internets have been flooded with all manner of speculation as to what is so groundbreaking about the latest update to FCP. Idle speculation alert — if you’re not a Final Cut-based editor or you simply don’t care about what could be, feel free to skip this post — we’ll get proper news soon enough. But because there are a lot of FCP editors out there — and because so many folks are throwing ideas at the wall — I thought I’d share a few of the ideas floating about. More »

Description image

CoreMelt makes post-production plugins for Final Cut Pro, Final Cut Express, After Effects and Motion. V2 of their extensive plugin bundle ships with 219 GPU-accelerated plugins and costs $399, but they’ve also made 33 of them absolutely free. Here’s a look at the complete V2 product range, from which the 33 free ones are taken: More »

Description image

Apple (finally) demonstrated the new version of Final Cut Pro to industry insiders this week, and because everyone who saw it is under a Non Disclosure Agreement, we won’t be hearing any details about it soon (until sometime around NAB, I’m guessing — though Apple is not listed as an exhibitor, they will likely stage their own event). Without going into specifics, however, the new FCP is being called “the biggest overhaul to Final Cut Pro since the original version was created over 10 years ago,” and more simply, “jaw-dropping.” More on the new FCP in a second. Apple also released new MacBook Pros this week, which, along with the usual slew of processor and graphics updates, debuted a brand new 10Gbps (read: ridiculously fast) interface — Thunderbolt. Apple Pro is back. More »

Description image

Aliasing and Moiré. The bane of many HDSLR shooters’ existence. Many have tried and failed to defeat the jaggies and discoloration that reveal the ugly, line-skipping truth about our DSLRs. But now Jorgen Escher has released a Final Cut Pro plugin that can defeat some of these problems. While you shouldn’t expect Jorgen’s plugin to cure the most serious of aliasing issues, he’s come up with a post-production method that works by defining the problem areas and applying chroma blur. Here’s the before/after video: More »

Description image

Thanks to Adobe Premiere Pro CS5′s ability to edit DSLR and other h.264 footage without the need to transcode, editors have been switching in droves away from Final Cut Pro. In my How to Build a Hackintosh article, I include a section specifically for video editors switching from FCP to Premiere, including how to do so without having to learn any new keystrokes. But for anyone with lingering questions as to why an enterprising editor might switch, Adobe is presenting four free online workshops: More »