» Posts Tagged ‘finalcutpro’

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If you’ve ever worked in linear tape-to-tape editing, there’s a good chance you’ve dealt with an edit controller device that has jog or shuttle wheels. With everything being software based now, many have simply reassigned to a keyboard the tasks that used to be associated with a console. Well, short of buying an expensive console to interface with your NLE or remembering dozens of keyboard shortcuts, what’s a video editor to do? That’s where Jeff Chow’s CTRL+Console iOS app comes in. Click through to check out the Kickstarter video. More »

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Apple’s Final Cut Pro X has slowly been getting up to speed after a somewhat underwhelming release last year. Each update has brought features users were expecting in the first version, but it’s still a good sign that they’re coming. With the recent 10.0.6 update, Apple has made a few key additions and changes that may just make you reconsider the editing application for future projects, including native RED support. Two of the major additions, dual viewer windows (Event and Timeline), and override connections, will certainly be helpful to those who like working in a more traditional manner. Click through for videos showing off both of these features. More »

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It’s no secret that Apple has neglected to update the Mac Pro line in any significant way since 2010. In fact, both the iMac and the Macbook Pro have gotten a few major revisions just in that time span, and many have turned to building Hackintoshes to satisfy the growing need for professional equipment (and to save a few bucks). We’re getting word from CEO Tim Cook that one should be coming in 2013, but the details have been vague. A Facebook page was started by Lou Borella, a freelance editor/animator, to bring together professionals looking for Apple to address this growing issue. Now that the new Apple philosophy is becoming more clear, Lou has addressed the state of Apple and the Mac Pro line, and what he thinks will be coming in the next version.

This is a guest post from Lou Borella. More »

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Really skinny hardware isn’t the only type of tech Apple’s been cooking up recently. They’ve also updated FCP X to 10.0.6 with a host of new features, including native, real-time (on most machines) support for R3D files thanks to a new plug-in and some nifty background rendering. This means big-savings on time for FCP X/RED users — especially with the assist of a RED ROCKET — plus an upgrade in quality if you’ve been using proxies. For the plug-in and update download links, plus a video demonstrating just how easy this could make things for you FCP X editors out there, read on! More »

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Do you see the laptop graphic to the left here? This is is a dramatization of what you’ll want to do should you ever mis-manage your file naming or folder structure on a project. Luckily, there are several tips from around the web to help with file management. Let’s pick ourselves up by the bootstraps, and dig in with some helpful (and ultra exciting!) tips for file management. More »

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While it seems that Premiere gets most of the attention these days, there are still plenty of users who are cutting their work on Final Cut Pro X. Regardless of the reason, FCPX can be a little quirky in how it deals with audio and video, and some functions are slightly different than they were in Final Cut Pro 7. In this tutorial from Steve Martin of Ripple Training, learn how to remove unwanted sounds from your audio in Final Cut Pro X. More »

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If you’re a Final Cut Pro 7 or Final Cut Pro X user and have been thinking about checking out Adobe Premiere Pro CS6, you probably have some questions about the similarities and differences in how they operate, or their advantages and disadvantages as editing tools. Scott Simmons of ProVideo Coalition recently held a webinar where he fielded 105 of these questions, which he turned into a very informative blog post. Here are a couple samples of the questions he answered: More »

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It’s no secret that Apple has been moving into the consumer space for the past five years, with the introduction of the iPhone and iPad, and the long wait between versions of Final Cut Studio, with the most recent version, Final Cut Pro X, resembling their consumer editing application iMovie. Whether FCPX has professional features is another matter entirely, but there’s no denying that they’ve abandoned most of the professional suite and are sticking to lower-priced applications sold through the App Store. While it seems Apple is banking on higher resolutions to sell more iPads and iPhones, they’ve ignored many professionals that have made Apple the brand they are today. Rumor has it that the Mac Pro line may be finished, but a working professional has created a Facebook page seeking answers. More »

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Not everyone who reads NoFilmSchool is an expert – in fact most of us are still trying to learn something – and that’s really the reason why we hope people keep coming back each day. If you’re new to filmmaking, your editing experience is probably very limited – and it can be overwhelming starting from scratch. One of the most important things you can do if you aren’t very experienced is to learn good habits right from the start. This isn’t limited to editing, but also shooting and managing media. There’s always more than one way to do something – but there are certainly wrong ways to do many things that can lead to mistakes or slow you down. In terms of editing, organization is something every professional editor will stress above all else. Embedded below is a video describing that process. More »

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On the left is a brand new shot of Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 running on…Mac OS 6? Conan’s editors are back again after their Final Cut Pro X video, which fairly or unfairly poked fun at the fact that Apple abandoned years of development and started over from scratch, forcing many people to relearn the new software or abandon ship. It looks like the editors over at Conan have done the latter. More »

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Yes, very well. But also, not quite. With Apple’s 10.0.3 release of Final Cut Pro X, they added multicam support and a host of other features, but more importantly for some, they finally made it possible to move projects from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X. Well, that’s not quite true. Apple didn’t actually make this possible – they are promoting the product of a 3rd party, Intelligent Design, to facilitate upgrading old projects. Here’s a quick overview of the process: More »

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I know, I know, Final Cut Pro X has been slammed by many, so what’s the point in posting yet another article about it? Well, one question I’ve been asked a lot since the release of FCP X is, “I’m a student, what NLE should I learn?” Before, the answer was easy: Final Cut Pro. Now, not so much. Should a student commit to FCP X, assuming it will become the future standard despite being woefully incomplete at present, or should they learn Adobe or Avid, assuming Apple’s role in the professional, wage-earning editing world as we know it is over? It’s a tough question, and I’m curious to hear your thoughts in the comments. In the meantime, here’s famed editor Walter Murch (The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather II, and The English Patient among many others) talking about the X at the Boston Supermeet: More »

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XML import/export has finally made its way to Final Cut Pro X in a 10.0.1 update Apple released today. This brings, yes, a form of backwards compatibility for Final Cut Pro 7 users, as one can now import and export rich XML files from FCPX. Unfortuantely — and I initially misunderstood this — “rich XML” does NOT work with Final Cut Pro 7 (more on this after the jump)! But also among the new features are GPU-accelerated export rendering (as opposed to just playback), Xsan support, and a camera import SDK (to allow developers to write plugins for specific cameras). Apple’s Richard Townhill, senior director of applications product marketing said of the release: More »

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After days of rumors, it’s official: according to Apple, “a limited quantity of Final Cut Studio [are] still available through Apple telesales to customers who need them for ongoing projects.” What’s the big deal? Apple had previously pulled all copies of FCS from the shelves, and this represents a capitulation to the ongoing demand for their two year-old NLE in the face of negative reactions to FCPX. I thought Walter Biscardi put it best: More »

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While stalled underground on a NYC subway several weeks ago, on my phone I started writing a post entitled “Final Cut Pro X is a Brilliant Rethink of the NLE, but I’m Switching to Adobe. Here’s Why.” (It’s not because Adobe is offering 50% off, though that helps). The train delay turned out to be of a briefer variety than expected, and so I never finished the post — and since then hundreds of bloggers have talked ad nauseum about FCP X and I haven’t felt a need to add another voice to the mix. However, this presentation by Evan Schechtman at NYC’s Apple shop Tekserve is the best overview/history/contextualizing of the FCP X situation I’ve seen (and not just its past, but its future): More »

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Denver Riddle from Color Grading Central has released a free 15-part tutorial on color correction in Final Cut Pro X. Apple’s controversial NLE reboot introduces a number of new features and interface elements, chief of which is the Color Board, seen in the following tutorial. Hit the full link below for all 15 parts, which in addition to streaming for free are available as downloads for $49. More »

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The Final Cut Pro X release has so many editors up in arms that one mocking video is not enough. Jeffrey Harrell cut this exploration of Final Cut Pro X’s (missing) features to emulate the trailer for The Social Network, using snippets of Steve Jobs’ own speech from WWDC ’97: More »

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Now that Final Cut Pro X has been out for a full 24 hours, the internet has rendered its verdict on the render-free software, and most of the backlash on Twitter seems to be coming from seasoned professionals. Sure, there were bound to be some repercussions when rebooting an application with a 94% customer satisfaction rate. But some of the features Apple dropped — tape ingest, multiclip, backward compatibility, and the viewer itself — make the “Pro” moniker pretty hard to justify. I’m only getting my hands dirty with FCP X now — which, I should note, works perfectly on the video editor’s hackintosh — and while I’m definitely experiencing some growing pains getting used to the new interface, I feel it’s too early to tell whether I’ll go back to Premiere Pro. However, here are some quotes of what’s being said around the web. Also, I want to hear from you — what are your honest thoughts so far? More »

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As promised, Apple today released Final Cut Pro X on the Mac App Store for $299. The completely-redesigned, much debated application clocks in at 1.33GB and requires a 64-bit processor and OS X 10.6.7 or later. Also debuting today are Motion 5 and Compressor 4 — both priced at only $49.99 apiece. More »

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Reports are surfacing that Apple’s much-ballyhooed 64-bit editing application Final Cut Pro X will be released in the Mac App Store next week. AppleInsider has further confirmed the application will be released “in the next 10 days.” No word on whether this release also includes Motion, Color, Soundtrack Pro, or any other applications that may make up a professional content-creation suite, but the reports also mention that we should expect additional releases alongside the software: More »