» Posts Tagged ‘gear’

Description image

Since the explosion of DSLRs, shoulder rigs have become almost a necessity for smooth handheld work. Some you can buy on the cheap, others you can build yourself for even cheaper, and one can even double as a portable jib solution. Name brand rigs will save you the trouble of a DIY assembly job, and should hold up well enough to use on just about any shoot, but they’ll cost you quite a bit more. Now we’ve got another how-to video, this time geared toward shooters who’d like to build their own somewhat heavy-duty shoulder rig for as little as $100. Check out the video and the full eBay items list below. More »

Description image

One of the biggest problems with jibs is that they can be cumbersome to carry with you and pack away. We’ve seen different solutions for this problem, one recent product that dealt with this was the Aviator Travel Jib (which was actually a successful Kickstarter project). Now Kessler, who is best known for their slider products — but has been producing some other interesting gear in the last few years — is teasing a brand new jib that should be great for transporting while still giving you fantastic moving shots. Click through to check out the teaser video for the new Kessler Pocket Jib Traveler. More »

Description image

As a longtime owner of a Redrock shouldermount rig, a recent announcement from the accessory manufacturer almost makes me wish I had instead waited the eight-some-odd years to spring for the package today. Actually, it’s still pretty good news to me, and any other current rig owners, for that matter — because what’s announced isn’t a new Redrock rig unto itself, but instead upgrades for key components for any shouldermount setup. Bump the jump for the details. More »

Description image

If you want to do steady handheld work with most small cameras — like DSLRs — a shoulder rig is almost a must. They vary in price rather drastically, and they come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. There are plenty of budget rigs around, some from better known companies than others, but not many of them can break $100 as a starting price point — but that’s exactly what the Filmcity FC-10 Shoulder Rig does. Click through to check out a video showing off the rig. More »

Description image

Despite the recently reduced price of RED cameras, each model still requires a lot of (pricey) accessories. We’ve pointed this out from the very beginning, but now we’ve gone further and compiled some realistic shooting packages at three different levels: a “cheapest possible ONE MX” list by Aaron Rich, an “owner/operator SCARLET” package by myself, and a “full professional EPIC” package by Timur Civan. Our overall goal with this post is not just to introduce (potential) RED shooters to some accessory options and needs for the RED ONE MX, SCARLET, and EPIC, but to hopefully create a post wherein users can share what has worked best for them. Let’s get started, this is going to be a long one! More »

Description image

Imagine this. You’re working a RED Epic film with a bunch of new crew members, and you’re in the camera department. It’s the first set of the second day. This production is moving, and you shot 10 pages the previous day. Your DP calls out for the 35mm Cooke prime — no sweat. You head over to the video village or camera cart, look for the lens case, and *gasp* the case isn’t there. After a full half hour of looking, your team can’t find the missing lenses. Panic ensues, mistrust starts to brew, and fingers begin to get pointed. What’re you to do? There may be an innovative solution for you if you’ve got a prepared equipment manager — the StickNFind, a bluetooth powered  location sticker that works with Android or iOS. Click through to see the IndieGoGo pitch video: More »

Description image

One of the most crucial pieces to a great documentary is the interview. In post production you will ground your edit around a transcription of what these people have to say about your subject. When you are performing the interview, you obviously want the subject looking straight at you to achieve a human connection and better result. But what if you want to connect your subject to the audience more… how would you go about making the connection with the subject while getting a first-person angle on them? Enter the Interrotron, a favorite device used by Oscar winner Errol Morris. Check out these clips from Fog of War, his Oscar winner that used the device: More »

Description image

Just a couple of days ago I considered the merits of the DIY slider versus the bevy of semi- and professional mini-dolly options. Well now I’ve stumbled upon a product that could very well be a step up from the other sliders out there — the Rhino Slider. This little beast is currently campaigning on Kickstarter with only a few days to go. And like most successful campaigns, it starts at a retail discount with many optional add-on’s. Click through for the details and a few videos, including one that features space flight (I wasn’t kidding), and one that will have you throwing money at your computer monitor faster than you can say Futurama: More »

Description image

One of the most coveted DIY projects around (next to perhaps the jib) is the slider. However, DIY is usually a balance between cost savings and function, and this $10-$15 slider from Ryan Connolly at Film Riot is no different. Let’s take a look at how far you can stretch your dollar for a functional slider. Hit the jump for the tutorial: More »

Description image

We’ve all been there… it’s the twelfth hour, and you’re Cam Op or DP on a skeleton crew that’s shooting on a DSLR. The director wants that organic, handheld, flowing look, and stopping just isn’t an option because the talent are in the zone. You’ve been shooting on the 50mm a little too much for your taste, and would love to try the 35mm or 85mm — but your lens bag might as well be on the moon with how fast things are moving (and with no AC). What do you do? Wouldn’t it be great if there was a tool to help with your quick run-and-gun filmmaking — to keep your lens choices literally at your fingertips? Well, with the Quikdraw, a new belt-side lens holder that’s seeking funding on Kickstarter, you can have the luxury of lens change speed with some added security. Click through to see a video of the system in action. More »

Description image

There are a few schools of thought in camera design, and I’ve gone over my personal preference in some detail. If a camera isn’t designed to be put on your shoulder, it can be extremely helpful if it can at least be rigged in a sensible way to work in whatever capacity you need it to. Quite a few people have been worried about the ergonomics of the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, but like most cameras of this size and general shape, you’ll probably want to add some sort of rigging if you’re doing anything other than using it on a tripod. Thankfully, the popularity of the Cinema Camera means we are going to get quite a few third party solutions to satisfy any shooting need. More »

Description image

The Aviator Travel Jib is one of the lighter jibs in existence, and if you haven’t checked it out, we’ve already talked about their successful Kickstarter campaign. Zeke Kamm, the inventor of the Travel Jib, is running a contest right until July 9th where he will be giving away an Aviator Travel Jib Mag Alloy Kit, 3 Legged Thing tripod, and a thinkTank Airport Commuter camera backpack. Below are the details. More »

Description image

Traveling with equipment is always stressful and time-consuming, especially as the amount and cost of said equipment increases. There is always a balance between what you really need and what would be helpful, and often many just prefer to bring as much as they can even if it might not get used. In the video embedded below, Trey Chance, who has made over 100 hotel, tourism, and resort commercials in the last few years, takes us through the equipment he travels with on small to medium projects. More »

Description image

There are plenty of interesting designs for follow focuses out there, and some just take the basic design and make it cheap and sturdy. Edelkrone is known for coming up with fascinating solutions to problems that exist with filmmaking gear, and the FocusONE PRO is no exception. If you’re using DSLRs and doing all of the shooting yourself, this looks like it could be a really innovative way to get marks quickly that can be repeated relatively easily. More »

Description image

If you’ve been around film/video/audio in any professional capacity for a reasonable amount of time, you know that nothing ever just works. Each device has a seemingly different connector than the last, and you’ve always got every connector but the one you need. A new section of B&H called Cable Finder can help you find virtually any cable or adapter that they sell on their site. Not only is this great for experienced professionals, but if you’ve got some less knowledgeable folks trying to buy the right cables, they can look at the photos to determine exactly the cable or adapter they need. More »

Description image

Camera movement can not only make your shots more interesting, they can help move the story forward in a way that static shots cannot. Most of my experience with jibs has been with the rather large and bulky Miller jibs that are made for extremely heavy cameras. In these days of small cameras and DSLRs, a heavy duty miller jib is overkill for a DSLR that weighs only a few pounds. That’s where the Aviator Travel Jib comes in, and even though the Kickstarter project has successfully raised funding, there’s still a chance to get one at a greatly reduced price: More »

Description image

After Atomos made quite the splash with their Ninja ProRes SSD external recorder, they announced at this year’s NAB an update to that model, the Ninja 2, as well as a new operating system called AtomOS 3.0. While users of the original Ninja recorder will not be able to benefit from the updated software and its new features, owners of the Atomos Samurai HD-SDI recorder can download the firmware update now. Here is an overview of some of the new additions in the brand new version of their operating system: More »

Description image

Catclaw Power Adapter for DSLR or Blackmagic Cinema CameraOne of the big questions with the forthcoming Blackmagic Cinema Camera is what people will use to power the camera after the internal battery is depleted. While the Cinema Camera has a fixed internal battery similar to the just-released Macbook Pro, it has a 12V-30V DC port which will allow you plug in any compatible power source to not only power the camera, but also charge the internal battery. If you’re looking for an inexpensive device to accomplish this, there is an interesting product called the Catclaw, which has a 15mm rod clamp, 5V, 7V, and 12V outputs, and takes Sony or V-Lock batteries. More »

Description image

Wondering what new filmmaking tools were on display at Cine Gear 2012? Our friends over at FreshDV were there to cover the expo, and have posted videos on the newest gear from Cinevate, Kino Flo, Hive, Kessler, and many others. Check out their first 7 videos on their Vimeo playlist (with more videos to be added to the playlist today and tomorrow): More »

Description image

While you can find plenty of follow focuses online, some are hefty but fairly expensive while others are of a less-than-desirable build quality and rarely have the filmmaker in mind when they are being designed. This Lanparte follow focus caught my attention not just because of build quality, but also the price — for around $400 (depending on where you buy it), you can get this model with hard stops and a handy quick release system that makes attaching and removing simple. Below is a video review of the follow focus. More »